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SOC 126 – Introduction to Justice and Punishment

2017 – S2 External

General Information

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Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit Convenor
Peter Rogers
Contact via peter.rogers@mq.edu.au
Vicki Worthington
Credit points Credit points
3
Prerequisites Prerequisites
12cp at 100 level or above
Corequisites Corequisites
Co-badged status Co-badged status
Unit description Unit description
This unit offers students an opportunity to examine the social, moral and political relationships that underpin 'justice' and 'punishment' in the modern world. This criminology unit provides a particular focus on the purpose and aims of the criminal justice system. The 'cycle of justice' is unpacked, including: interacting with the police; what happens in court; how we punish people and what we expect to happen after punishment has been administered. Students are encouraged to re-examine the socially constructed nature of both justice and punishment, questioning the purpose of law and the role it plays in maintaining, or disrupting, established notions of fairness and equity from a criminological perspective. Students will get to go and see justice in action and report back on their findings.

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at http://students.mq.edu.au/student_admin/enrolmentguide/academicdates/

Learning Outcomes

  1. Demonstrate a scholarly understanding of the criminal justice system using social and criminological theory and research
  2. Critically apply 'criminal justice' and 'social justice' to the Australian criminal justice system
  3. Use social research skills to analyse, interpret and assess different sources of data and evidence
  4. Critically assess justice 'done' and justice 'managed' in the Australian criminal justice system
  5. Critically assess key concepts in the sociology of law and criminology across local, regional and global examples
  6. Communicate ideas on crime and society to fellow students and teachers clearly in spoken and written format
  7. Engage in independent observation activity in a courtroom environment
  8. Demonstrate a continuous commitment to learning by preparing for and engaging in all online activities in a timely fashion

General Assessment Information

ACTIVE PARTICIPATION

  • PREPARATION - students will prepare a draft of no more than ONE A4 PAGE OF REFLEXIVE NOTES on the reading material (listed online) every week as preparation. This is to be posted in the weekly activity space in the ONLINE WIKI  as evidence of preparation for the week (SEE IMPORTANT NOTE BELOW). 
  • EXTERNAL STUDENT WIKI PARTICIPATION - Your engagement and participation in all activities and discussions in the online wiki space will be marked. This includes, but is not limited to: using appropriate materials (e.g. readings) in posts, multiple discursive engagements with the weekly topic (i.e. posting between 4-8 times a week on average to the wiki page), participation in feedback by responding to posts made by other students in the wiki, asking informed questions, with extra credit for flagging readings and other relevant materials beyond those provided in your posts.
  • GENERAL DISCUSSION BOARD PARTICIPATION - You will be asked to contribute to other online activities, such as periodic READING REVIEWS in the general discussion board. 
  • All online activities MUST be completed within 7 days of the weekly lecture. Failure to meet the deadline will result in a mark of '0' for that activity.

IMPORTANT NOTE: If a student cannot complete any aspect of an online activity in a timely fashion they are required to provide documentation to justify thier failure to submit. Once all documentation has been approved by our teaching staff (unit convenor or tutors only) you will be authorised to complete an alternative activity in the general discussion board thread entitled 'MAKE UP ACTIVITIES'. If you do not post in the correct thread for your makeup activity your post will be deleted and you will receive a mark of '0' for the task, so make sure to post in the right place and follow all of the instructions provided.

PERFORMANCE REQUIREMENTS: Students are expected to attend or complete a total of 75% of ALL ACTIVE PARTICIPATION ACTIVITIES. Students who fail to acheive this threshold may be subject to review and even potential capping of the grade.

 

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REFLECTIVE READING NOTES

This task connects learning skills and outcomes from your classroom preparation (see Active Participation above) to your Court Report (see below).

Students will submit 3 reflections on the weekly readings throughout term.

These will follow the guidance supplied in iLearn - which in line with assesssment policy provides an outline for how to approach it and demonstrates the rubric for the assessment in more depth). Student will have the chance to draw on the informal academic feedback and peer review received in tutorial exercises to help develop thier reflective capabilities, linking reflections on readings in weekly classes to reflections on observations in the field undertaken for the court report. Developing ones reflective capabilities in both theory and empirical work in this way lays foundations for formalising analytical notes into the court report, linking key skills being developed throughout all exercises more clearly.

This task is split into 3 parts and requires three submissions via the turnitin task in iLearn. Deadlines for these tasks are listed in iLearn.

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ONLINE QUIZ

The online quiz will test some basic knowledge on the course content for the first 6 weeks of the unit. It also tests student engagement with web resources and awareness of some basics about the Australian criminal justice system required for completion of later assessments. It serves to review and consolidate previous learning techniques, strategies and writing skills that are a core of social science, sociology and criminology disciplines.

This test will be made available through i-learn from week 5 until week 7 of the term (including the semester half-term break). Students may complete the quiz at any time within this period. Failure to complete the quiz within this time will result in a mark of ‘0’ for the online quiz component. Instructions for the completion of the quiz will be provided in i-learn when the quiz is released. This focuses on discipline specific knowledge and developing a basic set of reflections at the lower order level of learning. Nonetheless it remains vital as a basis for your further study and as a commitment to continuous learning testing a narrow but important range of capabilities and learning outcomes.

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THE COURT REPORT

In observing justice in the courtroom, would you say that what you saw was the IDEAL of justice being DONE or the PROCESS of justice being MANAGED? Make reference to specific cases and contrast and compare the outcomes to support your claims.

Extended guidance on the assessment requirements will be provided in the i-Learn space. Refer to this guidance for a full breakdown of the assessment, the stages you go through and details of how to make observations, take notes, review and analyse notes and write up the report. Questions should be posted to the general discussion board before contacting academic staff.

 

NOTE: If not listed here the deadlines for the above tasks are listed in iLearn. Check the turnitintasks or ASSESSMENTS box in iLearn or post to the general discussion board for assistance.

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Due
Active Participation 15% ONGOING
Online Quiz 15% Week 7
Reflective Reading Notes 15% SEE iLEARN
Court Report 55% Week 13

Active Participation

Due: ONGOING
Weighting: 15%

This is about much more than simply turning up. There are several parts to your active participation grade. Full details can be found below


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Demonstrate a scholarly understanding of the criminal justice system using social and criminological theory and research
  • Critically apply 'criminal justice' and 'social justice' to the Australian criminal justice system
  • Use social research skills to analyse, interpret and assess different sources of data and evidence
  • Critically assess justice 'done' and justice 'managed' in the Australian criminal justice system
  • Critically assess key concepts in the sociology of law and criminology across local, regional and global examples
  • Communicate ideas on crime and society to fellow students and teachers clearly in spoken and written format
  • Engage in independent observation activity in a courtroom environment
  • Demonstrate a continuous commitment to learning by preparing for and engaging in all online activities in a timely fashion

Online Quiz

Due: Week 7
Weighting: 15%

The online quiz will test basic knowledge on the course content for the first 6 weeks of the unit.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Demonstrate a scholarly understanding of the criminal justice system using social and criminological theory and research
  • Critically assess justice 'done' and justice 'managed' in the Australian criminal justice system
  • Critically assess key concepts in the sociology of law and criminology across local, regional and global examples
  • Communicate ideas on crime and society to fellow students and teachers clearly in spoken and written format

Reflective Reading Notes

Due: SEE iLEARN
Weighting: 15%

Students are required to formally submit 3 reflective notes, drawing on thier classroom preparation throughout the session


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Demonstrate a scholarly understanding of the criminal justice system using social and criminological theory and research
  • Use social research skills to analyse, interpret and assess different sources of data and evidence
  • Communicate ideas on crime and society to fellow students and teachers clearly in spoken and written format
  • Demonstrate a continuous commitment to learning by preparing for and engaging in all online activities in a timely fashion

Court Report

Due: Week 13
Weighting: 55%

A research report using observation skills. Full details including word count are provided in iLearn. Please post all questions to the general discussion board before contacting academic staff.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Critically apply 'criminal justice' and 'social justice' to the Australian criminal justice system
  • Critically assess justice 'done' and justice 'managed' in the Australian criminal justice system
  • Communicate ideas on crime and society to fellow students and teachers clearly in spoken and written format
  • Engage in independent observation activity in a courtroom environment

Delivery and Resources

Teaching

LECTURE & TUTORIALS are used in this unit. A 2 hour lecture is supported by one hour tutorials in smaller groups. Locations will be confirmed through the online system. Rooms may change depending on timetabling and enrollments so check these on the online timetable regularly for updates.

Required and recommended resources

The required texts (and weekly readings) for this unit of study are not listed in the online unit guide.

The reference for weekly readings will be posted in the iLearn system, be aware that we cannot post up large sections of the books online due to copyright restrictions so many of readings may be rotated in the library system for shorter periods of time.

Text books should be available through the Co-op bookstore on MQ campus, though stock may be limited. You can also check the second hand book store on campus or book exchanges for cheaper second-hand copies. Visit the book store for more information. Supplementary readings may be made available on iLearn and in e-reserve where possible, but your required readings each week are usually from one of the two textbooks.

Technologies Used & Required

Enrolled students on this course will need access to a computer and to the internet (both of which are available through MQU campus). Though use of a solid internet connection off campus will facilitate the ease of access to online learning materials and support.

Unit Schedule

 

WEEK 1

INTRODUCTION TO THE UNIT

WEEK 2

KEY CONCEPTS

WEEK 3

WHAT IS JUSTICE?

WEEK 4

THE POLITICS OF CONTROL

WEEK 5

ASSESSMENT WORKSHOPS

WEEK 6

HOW DOES JUSTICE HAPPEN?

WEEK 7

WHATS TO JUDGE

WEEK 8

WHAT HAPPENS NEXT?

WEEK 9

ALTERNATIVE APPROACHES TO JUSTICE I

WEEK 10

ALTERNATIVE APPROACHES TO JUSTICE II

WEEK 11

WHO SUFFERS MOST?

WEEK 12

UNIT SUMMARY                              

WEEK 13

NO LECTURE

Learning and Teaching Activities

Lectures

Weekly lectures on discipline specific content

Tutorials

Weekly tutorials on content, workshops on assessments and skill development

Online Discussion

Accessing group spaces online and general discussion boards to participate in critical debate

Announcements

Access convenor announcements for up-to-date information

iLearn

Access Ilearn and echo360 to download and review lecture slides, content and relevant information

Policies and Procedures

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central. Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Academic Honesty Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/academic_honesty/policy.html

Assessment Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/assessment/policy_2016.html

Grade Appeal Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/gradeappeal/policy.html

Complaint Management Procedure for Students and Members of the Public http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/complaint_management/procedure.html​

Disruption to Studies Policy http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/disruption_studies/policy.html The Disruption to Studies Policy is effective from March 3 2014 and replaces the Special Consideration Policy.

In addition, a number of other policies can be found in the Learning and Teaching Category of Policy Central.

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/support/student_conduct/

Results

Results shown in iLearn, or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent. For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au.

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Learning Skills

Learning Skills (mq.edu.au/learningskills) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to improve your marks and take control of your study.

Student Enquiry Service

For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at ask.mq.edu.au

Equity Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

IT Help

For help with University computer systems and technology, visit http://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/information_technology/help/

When using the University's IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use of IT Resources Policy. The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network including students.

Graduate Capabilities

Critical, Analytical and Integrative Thinking

We want our graduates to be capable of reasoning, questioning and analysing, and to integrate and synthesise learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments; to be able to critique constraints, assumptions and limitations; to be able to think independently and systemically in relation to scholarly activity, in the workplace, and in the world. We want them to have a level of scientific and information technology literacy.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Critically assess key concepts in the sociology of law and criminology across local, regional and global examples
  • Demonstrate a continuous commitment to learning by preparing for and engaging in all online activities in a timely fashion

Assessment tasks

  • Active Participation
  • Online Quiz
  • Reflective Reading Notes

Creative and Innovative

Our graduates will also be capable of creative thinking and of creating knowledge. They will be imaginative and open to experience and capable of innovation at work and in the community. We want them to be engaged in applying their critical, creative thinking.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Use social research skills to analyse, interpret and assess different sources of data and evidence
  • Communicate ideas on crime and society to fellow students and teachers clearly in spoken and written format
  • Engage in independent observation activity in a courtroom environment

Assessment tasks

  • Active Participation
  • Online Quiz
  • Court Report

Socially and Environmentally Active and Responsible

We want our graduates to be aware of and have respect for self and others; to be able to work with others as a leader and a team player; to have a sense of connectedness with others and country; and to have a sense of mutual obligation. Our graduates should be informed and active participants in moving society towards sustainability.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Critically apply 'criminal justice' and 'social justice' to the Australian criminal justice system
  • Critically assess justice 'done' and justice 'managed' in the Australian criminal justice system
  • Communicate ideas on crime and society to fellow students and teachers clearly in spoken and written format

Assessment tasks

  • Active Participation
  • Online Quiz
  • Court Report

Discipline Specific Knowledge and Skills

Our graduates will take with them the intellectual development, depth and breadth of knowledge, scholarly understanding, and specific subject content in their chosen fields to make them competent and confident in their subject or profession. They will be able to demonstrate, where relevant, professional technical competence and meet professional standards. They will be able to articulate the structure of knowledge of their discipline, be able to adapt discipline-specific knowledge to novel situations, and be able to contribute from their discipline to inter-disciplinary solutions to problems.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Demonstrate a scholarly understanding of the criminal justice system using social and criminological theory and research
  • Critically assess key concepts in the sociology of law and criminology across local, regional and global examples
  • Engage in independent observation activity in a courtroom environment
  • Demonstrate a continuous commitment to learning by preparing for and engaging in all online activities in a timely fashion

Assessment tasks

  • Active Participation
  • Online Quiz
  • Reflective Reading Notes
  • Court Report

Problem Solving and Research Capability

Our graduates should be capable of researching; of analysing, and interpreting and assessing data and information in various forms; of drawing connections across fields of knowledge; and they should be able to relate their knowledge to complex situations at work or in the world, in order to diagnose and solve problems. We want them to have the confidence to take the initiative in doing so, within an awareness of their own limitations.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Use social research skills to analyse, interpret and assess different sources of data and evidence
  • Communicate ideas on crime and society to fellow students and teachers clearly in spoken and written format
  • Engage in independent observation activity in a courtroom environment

Assessment tasks

  • Active Participation
  • Online Quiz
  • Reflective Reading Notes
  • Court Report

Effective Communication

We want to develop in our students the ability to communicate and convey their views in forms effective with different audiences. We want our graduates to take with them the capability to read, listen, question, gather and evaluate information resources in a variety of formats, assess, write clearly, speak effectively, and to use visual communication and communication technologies as appropriate.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Demonstrate a scholarly understanding of the criminal justice system using social and criminological theory and research
  • Critically assess justice 'done' and justice 'managed' in the Australian criminal justice system
  • Demonstrate a continuous commitment to learning by preparing for and engaging in all online activities in a timely fashion

Assessment tasks

  • Active Participation
  • Online Quiz
  • Reflective Reading Notes
  • Court Report

Engaged and Ethical Local and Global citizens

As local citizens our graduates will be aware of indigenous perspectives and of the nation's historical context. They will be engaged with the challenges of contemporary society and with knowledge and ideas. We want our graduates to have respect for diversity, to be open-minded, sensitive to others and inclusive, and to be open to other cultures and perspectives: they should have a level of cultural literacy. Our graduates should be aware of disadvantage and social justice, and be willing to participate to help create a wiser and better society.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Critically apply 'criminal justice' and 'social justice' to the Australian criminal justice system
  • Critically assess justice 'done' and justice 'managed' in the Australian criminal justice system
  • Critically assess key concepts in the sociology of law and criminology across local, regional and global examples

Assessment tasks

  • Active Participation
  • Online Quiz
  • Court Report

Capable of Professional and Personal Judgement and Initiative

We want our graduates to have emotional intelligence and sound interpersonal skills and to demonstrate discernment and common sense in their professional and personal judgement. They will exercise initiative as needed. They will be capable of risk assessment, and be able to handle ambiguity and complexity, enabling them to be adaptable in diverse and changing environments.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Critically assess justice 'done' and justice 'managed' in the Australian criminal justice system
  • Communicate ideas on crime and society to fellow students and teachers clearly in spoken and written format
  • Engage in independent observation activity in a courtroom environment
  • Demonstrate a continuous commitment to learning by preparing for and engaging in all online activities in a timely fashion

Assessment tasks

  • Active Participation
  • Online Quiz
  • Court Report

Commitment to Continuous Learning

Our graduates will have enquiring minds and a literate curiosity which will lead them to pursue knowledge for its own sake. They will continue to pursue learning in their careers and as they participate in the world. They will be capable of reflecting on their experiences and relationships with others and the environment, learning from them, and growing - personally, professionally and socially.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Use social research skills to analyse, interpret and assess different sources of data and evidence
  • Communicate ideas on crime and society to fellow students and teachers clearly in spoken and written format
  • Engage in independent observation activity in a courtroom environment
  • Demonstrate a continuous commitment to learning by preparing for and engaging in all online activities in a timely fashion

Assessment tasks

  • Active Participation
  • Online Quiz
  • Reflective Reading Notes
  • Court Report

Changes from Previous Offering

We have reviewed the active participation requirements and amended the balance of activities, including the separation of reflective reading notes from active participation into its own distinct assessment. This allows for online submission of the reflections and more reliable marking against a formal rubric. 

We have replaced a week on crime prevention with material on restorative justice.

We have updated the student assessment guidance and simplified the rubrics for all activities

We have added a learning outcome to tie graduate capability on continuous learning into active participation more explicitly