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ICOM821 – Intercultural Communication

2017 – S1 Day

General Information

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Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit Convenor
Sabine Krajewski
Contact via sabine.krajewski@mq.edu.au
Y3A 165H
Mon after 4pm, please contact me per email to make an appointment.
Credit points Credit points
4
Prerequisites Prerequisites
Admission to MBiotech or MBiotechMCom or MIntBusMIntComm or MIntComm or MIntCommMIntRel or MIntRel or MPPP or MBioBus or GradDipBioTech
Corequisites Corequisites
Co-badged status Co-badged status
Unit description Unit description
Lectures and tutorials in this unit are organised around key issues in intercultural communication such as identity, power, globalisation, culture transition, taboo, and intercultural communication problems. Selected readings introduce key theories in the field and identify areas where intercultural communication takes place (business, multicultural communities, politics). In class, we draw upon current affairs in exploring particular settings in which intercultural skills are of vital importance. The unit reader presents a collection of key texts but there is strong emphasis on practical work where strategies of successful intercultural communication in interpersonal and international situations are being assessed.

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at http://students.mq.edu.au/student_admin/enrolmentguide/academicdates/

Learning Outcomes

  1. Demonstrate the disciplinary knowledge of the meaning of ‘culture’, and reflect that knowledge in an awareness of students' own cultural identity and development of intercultural empathy
  2. Analyse critically and evaluate the differences in verbal and non-verbal communication styles across cultures
  3. Demonstrate a clear understanding and broad knowledge of the key theories, scholars and debates in the field of intercultural communication
  4. Identify, interpret and communicate the broad and specific arguments contributing to intercultural knowledge and experience.
  5. Apply the theoretical modes of understanding the broad arguments underpinning the key theories, to everyday life
  6. Apply intercultural theory and research techniques to specific field work

General Assessment Information

Please note: Dates and times for assignment submission are in the due dates document on ilearn. You essay needs to be uploaded to turnitin as well as handed in as hard copy with signed coversheet to the appropriate box in Y3A (see exact location on ilearn) by the due date.  There will be a link where your presentation summaries can be uploaded on ilearn. You can do this until one week after your group presentation. There is no link for your Intercultural Sydney project, you can hand it in directly to me in class on or before the due date. Extensions for any assignment due to serious disruption of study need to be applied for online via student portal.

Late assignments will be penalized 10 percent of the mark per day. In cases of illness and misadventure students must submit official documentation including a PAF through disruption to Studies: http://students.mq.edu.au/student_admin/exams/disruption_to_studies/

 

 

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Hurdle Due
Group Presentation 30% ongoing
Participation 10% Ongoing
Essay 35% Week 9
Intercultural Sydney 25% Week 12

Group Presentation

Due: ongoing
Weighting: 30%

Group Presentation on a subject within our 5 key areas of study (identity,taboo, intercultural competence, power, intercultural conflict) plus short individual summary of your contribution to the presentation (300w). You may refer to the reader in preparation of your group presentation, but you need to consult additional materials. Your presentation (no electronic support) must not take more than 1hr of the tutorial time, so you need to make sure that each group member gets time to present. Good collaboration means that individual presentations are linked with each other and that the group has a common focus within the subject area. Each member of the group may present for 5-7 minutes. Make sure to involve the rest of the class in your presentation; this can be achieved by giving them a task to do in class or by introducing a game. The written summary is about your individual part of the presentation, but you may want to comment on how your group went about putting the presentation together and anything about the group work that you find interesting. You also need to include your most important findings and indicate the sources you consulted. Your summary needs to be referenced. Once individual summaries have been received (online), each student will be marked individually for their presentation and summary.

Criteria for group presentations

 

HD

D

CR

P

F

Topic

Good choice and balance of sources and materials on the topic. Suitable practical examples, personal examples (if any)linked to theory.

Use of different sources/materials to introduce topic;

Good practical examples

Critical view of texts in reader and/or of other related material ;

Some examples introduced

Text in course reader well summarized;

Some practical examples

Not well connected to topic of the week, all info taken from reader

Theoretical background

Critical evaluation of theory;

Linkage between theory mentioned in class and aspects not yet discussed

Good application of theory to case studies or relevant current affairs

Critical evaluation of theory;

introduction of theoretical aspects not mentioned in class before;

good application of theory (eg current affairs, case studies)

Critical evaluation of theory;

some application of theory (examples of current affairs, case studies)

Team correctly explains and uses known theory to back up presentation

Little or no theory

(Students use anecdotal evidence rather than theory)

Presentation style

Lively, mainly unaided presentation style, engaging use of space and materials, interaction between partners shows good knowledge of each other’s presentation parts.

Free speech (notes ok), clearly presented, innovative use of space and materials; good interaction between partners

Fairly free speech, group members use time evenly;

Lively, different modes of presentation , good coordination between team members

Clear presentation but read from script or at times incoherent/hard to follow. Presentation shows little coordination between team members

Read from script, not well coordinated between partners, difficult to follow, flawed content

Involvement of group

Creative engagement of audience, various tasks that help others understand and apply key issues and theoretical approaches.

Creative idea that engages rest of the class and helps them understand the issue presented

Includes activity to involve rest of the class in the presentation

Some effort to involve class but mainly presented by team

Little involvement of other students or reduced to question/answer

 

 

 

 

 

 


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Demonstrate the disciplinary knowledge of the meaning of ‘culture’, and reflect that knowledge in an awareness of students' own cultural identity and development of intercultural empathy
  • Analyse critically and evaluate the differences in verbal and non-verbal communication styles across cultures
  • Demonstrate a clear understanding and broad knowledge of the key theories, scholars and debates in the field of intercultural communication
  • Apply intercultural theory and research techniques to specific field work

Participation

Due: Ongoing
Weighting: 10%

Participation in tutorials is compulsory. You also need to attend lectures regularly, it will affect your participation mark if you do not attend lectures.

Criteria: students need to regularly attend lectures and tutorials (80% each), complete essential readings for each week as outlined in the reader and add to group discussions during tutorials.

HD

D

Cr

P

F

>80% attendance

Always punctual

>80% attendance

always punctual

>75% attendance

Almost always punctual

>75% attendance,

mostly punctual

poor attendance

Regular participation and meaningful contribution during tutes

Good collaboration, mindfulness and integration of others who may have language or other issues

Completion of most or all readings before class

regular participation and

significant contribution during tutes

has done most or all readings before class

regular participation

has done most readings before class

some participation,

has done some of the readings before class

no participation

 


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Demonstrate the disciplinary knowledge of the meaning of ‘culture’, and reflect that knowledge in an awareness of students' own cultural identity and development of intercultural empathy
  • Analyse critically and evaluate the differences in verbal and non-verbal communication styles across cultures
  • Identify, interpret and communicate the broad and specific arguments contributing to intercultural knowledge and experience.
  • Apply the theoretical modes of understanding the broad arguments underpinning the key theories, to everyday life

Essay

Due: Week 9
Weighting: 35%

Write an essay (2,500-3,000 words). Please refer to our website for essay guidelines and essay questions. Make sure to include references.

 

Marking Criteria Essay 821

 

HD

D

Cr

P

F

structure

Excellent intro, argumentative and logical, clearly structured essay with precise conclusion that reiterates and supports author’s argument

Clear intro, body and conclusion; paragraphs for each new topic/thought,

Conclusion clearly supports author’s argument

Recognisable introduction, body and conclusion,

Conclusion confirms author’s view

Recognisable introduction, body and conclusion though inappropriate length of either part, conclusion does not go beyond summary

No clear structure, no recognisable structure of thought or argument

referencing

Consistent and correct referencing throughout; complete in-text citations and reference list; good choice of  sources beyond reader, well balanced (books/journals, internet) appropriate amount

Consistent referencing throughout; proportional reference list with focus on sources outside of textbook, well balanced (books/journals, internet) appropriate amount

Consistent referencing; complete reference list sources beyond textbook

Inconsistencies in referencing or incomplete ref. list, most sources from internet or textbook

Inappropriate or no referencing, badly composed or no reference list

Argument

Clearly formulated, specific argument introduced by theoretical approach, well supported by discussion of relevant work of other scholars

Clear argument well supported by theoretical framework and relevant scholars

Clear argument but not well supported

or

Many relevant scholars discussed but no own argument

Some argument but inconsistent, scholars/theories referred to but not always conclusive or relevant

Merely a summary of what others have said

Or

Own argument but unsupported

relevance

Essay question clearly answered, status quo on current research introduced and relevant examples explained

Fully answers the essay question, introduces valid background info, relevant examples

Answers essay q but does not include much background information or examples

Answers essay question to large extend,

No relevant examples or background info

Does not address essay question

originality

Critical introduction of topic, own hypothesis, integration and evaluation of other scholars’ work

Has own hypothesis, integrates other scholars, uses critical approach

Some critical approach, some good use of other scholars

Solid evaluation of topic but no critical approach. Use of other scholars as in literature review

Not a valid discussion of topic (subjective view only)

 

 Late penalty:

Late assignments will be penalized 10 percent of the mark per day. In cases of illness and misadventure students must submit official documentation including a PAF through Disruption to Studies: http://students.mq.edu.au/student_admin/exams/disruption _to_studies/

 


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Demonstrate the disciplinary knowledge of the meaning of ‘culture’, and reflect that knowledge in an awareness of students' own cultural identity and development of intercultural empathy
  • Demonstrate a clear understanding and broad knowledge of the key theories, scholars and debates in the field of intercultural communication
  • Identify, interpret and communicate the broad and specific arguments contributing to intercultural knowledge and experience.

Intercultural Sydney

Due: Week 12
Weighting: 25%

In groups of 2 or 3, find a situation where intercultural communication takes place and show how it is used. You may analyse a website that promotes a language institute, look at the promotion of an intercultural event, compare Sydney suburbs, analyse multicultural events organised by the council, or choose to analyse intercultural communication in a company. You may want to pick an intercultural event and attend it yourselves, and interview others who also visit the event. In the end, connect your findings to a theoretical framework we have discussed in class. Your summary needs to reflect your research method and has to be referenced. This assessment task is designed to give you an opportunity to assess the practicality of what you learn from books and class discussions by conducting a small research project outside of the classroom. In collaboration with one or two students who have a cultural and/or linguistic background different from yours, you will design a project, collect data and summarize your results. Marks will be divided between the overall project and your individual contribution which will be outlined in your summary.

Note: you need to inform me about the nature of your project in advance because you may need information and consent forms approved by the university's ethics committee. Put your findings into a short paper (there is no word limit, usually students write around 1,500 words for a group of 3).

 

 

Intercultural Sydney criteria

 

HD

D

Cr

P

F

project

Innovative idea and appropriate research approach, manageable timeframe, clear research question and research outcome

Innovative idea, manageable timeframe, clear research question and research outcome

Suitable project idea, clear research question and some valid outcome

Suitable project idea but vague research question or outcome

Unsuitable project to research intercultural communication, too small or too large for timeframe, no clear research question/outcome

teamwork

Collaborative team work, strategic planning of project and written report drawing on each other’s excellent problem-solving skills and appreciation of intercultural teamwork as part of assessment

Competent team work: strategic planning of project and written report as a team, finding solutions to problems, appreciation of intercultural teamwork as part of assessment

Good approach to dividing tasks and solving problems as a team. Acknowledgement of intercultural teamwork as part of assessement

Visible effort to work as a team,

Some awareness of intercultural teamwork as part of assessment

Failure to work as a team, visibly separate parts of project pasted together or open dispute about who does what that cannot be solved by the team

Research technique and theoretical framework

Excellent choice of research methods. Research clearly set in suitable theoretical framework, critically explored and tested research question.

Excellent and appropriate presentation of results.

 

Research clearly set in suitable theoretical framework, critically explored and tested research question

Argument supported by using suitable research methods and relevant sources

Good reference to theories and scholars, well researched topic and suitable research method

Largely descriptive written account of project with some theoretical background but sketchy research method

No theoretical framework or references to related research, no suitable research method

 

 


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Demonstrate the disciplinary knowledge of the meaning of ‘culture’, and reflect that knowledge in an awareness of students' own cultural identity and development of intercultural empathy
  • Identify, interpret and communicate the broad and specific arguments contributing to intercultural knowledge and experience.
  • Apply the theoretical modes of understanding the broad arguments underpinning the key theories, to everyday life
  • Apply intercultural theory and research techniques to specific field work

Delivery and Resources

Lecture: Monday 9.00-10.00  W6B 336

Tutorial: Monday  10.00-11.30  W5C 311

Tutorial: Monday   11.30-1.00   W5C 311

Students are required to log onto ilearn at least once a week. This is where information is shared, links to readings are provided, updates given. Please get the prescribed textbook (Jackson, Jane, 2014. Introducing Language and Intercultural Communication. London, New York: Routledge.) from the coop and read the relevant chapters before each tutorial.

 

Unit Schedule

 Essential readings for this unit:

Textbook: Jackson, Jane (2014) Introducing Language and Intercultural Communication. London, New York: Routledge

 

Drobnick, J. (ed) (2006) The Smell Culture Reader. Oxford, New York: Berg

Guibernau, M. and J. Rex (ed.) (2010) The Ethnicity Reader. Nationalism, Multiculturalism & Migration. Cambridge: Polity Press

Jandt, E. (ed) (2010) An Introduction to Intercultural Communication: Identities in a Global Community. London: Sage

Samovar, Larry A., Porter, Richard E. and Edwin R. McDaniel (2011) Intercultural Communication: A Reader. Boston: Wadsworth

 

 

Week 1

 

Introduction: In this session we will look at the course outline and make final adjustments according to students' input. Subjects for group presentations will be introduced so that you can think about which topic you would like to work on.

 

 

 

Week 2

 

Definitions of culture, communication and intercultural communication. We will explore different theories in intercultural communication and assess their usefulness in intercultural settings

 

 

 

Week 3

Emotional Intelligence and intercultural friendship. Our focus is on the meaning of "friendship" and the opportunities and challenges of intercultural relationships. Read the additional article on the world of 'smell cultures’!

 

 

 

Week 4

 

Identity

Identity is one of the key issues in this course. This week we will discuss different concepts of identity and identity changes in a global setting.

Identity group presents

 

 

 

Week 5

Identity and social cognition

Continuing with our work on identity, we will study social cognitive processes.

 

 

 

Week 6

Cultural transition and Global Citizenship

This week is dedicated to topics around cultural transition. We will examine the factors that contribute to culture shock and identify strategies that may facilitate moving from one culture to another. Is global citizenship a theoretical concept or a viable way of life? Revision of ‘cultural intelligence’ and ‘intercultural competence’.

Transition group presents

 

 

 

Week 7

 

Taboo and censorship

In intercultural communication, the knowledge about taboo areas and about how to handle taboo breaches is vital. This week we will identify general and culture-specific taboos and concentrate on language and taboo. Read the additional article on taboo.

Taboo group presents

 

 

 

Week 8

Verbal and nonverbal codes

In this session we focus on cultural differences and how they are exemplified in verbal and nonverbal communication.

 

 

 

Week 9

Coding class race and gender

Continuing with 'codes' we look at how language register or clothing may be indicative of class, race and gender.

Essay due this Wed

 

 

 

Week 10

The notion of power

Power structures are yet another central issue in intercultural communication. We will examine concepts of power and the role power structures play in various intercultural settings.

Power group presents

 

 

 

Week 11

Conflict and communication

This week is dedicated to clashes between different approaches. Conflict that is based on cultural differences can be solved via effective communication.

Conflict group presents

 

 

 

Week 12

Intercultural Communication in the workplace

In business situations it is important to be prepared for culture-related clashes and to be able to arrive at a level of mutual understanding.

Intercultural Sydney due this Wed

 

 

 

Week 13

Global culture/ global citizenship

In our last session we will discuss and evaluate Intercultural Sydney experiences.

 

 

 

 

Policies and Procedures

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central. Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Academic Honesty Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/academic_honesty/policy.html

Assessment Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/assessment/policy_2016.html

Grade Appeal Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/gradeappeal/policy.html

Complaint Management Procedure for Students and Members of the Public http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/complaint_management/procedure.html​

Disruption to Studies Policy (in effect until Dec 4th, 2017): http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/disruption_studies/policy.html

Special Consideration Policy (in effect from Dec 4th, 2017): https://staff.mq.edu.au/work/strategy-planning-and-governance/university-policies-and-procedures/policies/special-consideration

In addition, a number of other policies can be found in the Learning and Teaching Category of Policy Central.

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/support/student_conduct/

Results

Results shown in iLearn, or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent. For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au.

Additional information

MMCCS website https://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/faculties_and_departments/faculty_of_arts/department_of_media_music_communication_and_cultural_studies/

MMCCS Session Re-mark Application http://www.mq.edu.au/pubstatic/public/download/?id=167914

Information is correct at the time of publication

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Learning Skills

Learning Skills (mq.edu.au/learningskills) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to improve your marks and take control of your study.

If you know that you need support (for example language support) and cannot find what you are looking for, seek advice from ICOM staff as early as possible in the semester.

Student Enquiry Service

For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at ask.mq.edu.au

Equity Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

IT Help

For help with University computer systems and technology, visit http://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/information_technology/help/

When using the University's IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use of IT Resources Policy. The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network including students.

Graduate Capabilities

PG - Capable of Professional and Personal Judgment and Initiative

Our postgraduates will demonstrate a high standard of discernment and common sense in their professional and personal judgment. They will have the ability to make informed choices and decisions that reflect both the nature of their professional work and their personal perspectives.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Analyse critically and evaluate the differences in verbal and non-verbal communication styles across cultures
  • Demonstrate a clear understanding and broad knowledge of the key theories, scholars and debates in the field of intercultural communication
  • Apply the theoretical modes of understanding the broad arguments underpinning the key theories, to everyday life

Assessment tasks

  • Group Presentation
  • Intercultural Sydney

PG - Discipline Knowledge and Skills

Our postgraduates will be able to demonstrate a significantly enhanced depth and breadth of knowledge, scholarly understanding, and specific subject content knowledge in their chosen fields.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Demonstrate the disciplinary knowledge of the meaning of ‘culture’, and reflect that knowledge in an awareness of students' own cultural identity and development of intercultural empathy
  • Demonstrate a clear understanding and broad knowledge of the key theories, scholars and debates in the field of intercultural communication
  • Identify, interpret and communicate the broad and specific arguments contributing to intercultural knowledge and experience.
  • Apply the theoretical modes of understanding the broad arguments underpinning the key theories, to everyday life
  • Apply intercultural theory and research techniques to specific field work

Assessment tasks

  • Group Presentation
  • Participation
  • Essay
  • Intercultural Sydney

PG - Critical, Analytical and Integrative Thinking

Our postgraduates will be capable of utilising and reflecting on prior knowledge and experience, of applying higher level critical thinking skills, and of integrating and synthesising learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments. A characteristic of this form of thinking is the generation of new, professionally oriented knowledge through personal or group-based critique of practice and theory.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Analyse critically and evaluate the differences in verbal and non-verbal communication styles across cultures
  • Identify, interpret and communicate the broad and specific arguments contributing to intercultural knowledge and experience.

Assessment tasks

  • Group Presentation
  • Essay

PG - Research and Problem Solving Capability

Our postgraduates will be capable of systematic enquiry; able to use research skills to create new knowledge that can be applied to real world issues, or contribute to a field of study or practice to enhance society. They will be capable of creative questioning, problem finding and problem solving.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Analyse critically and evaluate the differences in verbal and non-verbal communication styles across cultures
  • Demonstrate a clear understanding and broad knowledge of the key theories, scholars and debates in the field of intercultural communication
  • Apply intercultural theory and research techniques to specific field work

Assessment tasks

  • Essay
  • Intercultural Sydney

PG - Effective Communication

Our postgraduates will be able to communicate effectively and convey their views to different social, cultural, and professional audiences. They will be able to use a variety of technologically supported media to communicate with empathy using a range of written, spoken or visual formats.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Demonstrate the disciplinary knowledge of the meaning of ‘culture’, and reflect that knowledge in an awareness of students' own cultural identity and development of intercultural empathy
  • Identify, interpret and communicate the broad and specific arguments contributing to intercultural knowledge and experience.
  • Apply the theoretical modes of understanding the broad arguments underpinning the key theories, to everyday life

Assessment tasks

  • Participation
  • Intercultural Sydney

PG - Engaged and Responsible, Active and Ethical Citizens

Our postgraduates will be ethically aware and capable of confident transformative action in relation to their professional responsibilities and the wider community. They will have a sense of connectedness with others and country and have a sense of mutual obligation. They will be able to appreciate the impact of their professional roles for social justice and inclusion related to national and global issues

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Demonstrate the disciplinary knowledge of the meaning of ‘culture’, and reflect that knowledge in an awareness of students' own cultural identity and development of intercultural empathy
  • Apply the theoretical modes of understanding the broad arguments underpinning the key theories, to everyday life
  • Apply intercultural theory and research techniques to specific field work

Assessment task

  • Intercultural Sydney

Changes from Previous Offering

Taking student feedback into account, the extended essay will now count 35% towards the final mark (not 40%) and the research project Intercultural Sydney will count 25% instead of 20%. To ensure that all students know what is expected, one of the early tutorials will be dedicated to research approaches, online surveys and interview techniques as well as appropriate display of results.