Logo Students

ICOM811 – Issues in Contemporary Global Media

2017 – S1 Day

General Information

Pdf icon Download as PDF
Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff Convenor
Dr. Intan Paramaditha
Contact via intan.paramaditha@mq.edu.au
Y3A 193D
Please email for appointment.
Credit points Credit points
4
Prerequisites Prerequisites
Admission to MCreIndMFJ or MIntComm or MIntRel or MIntCommMIntRel or MIntBusMIntComm or GradDipIntRel
Corequisites Corequisites
Co-badged status Co-badged status
Unit description Unit description
This unit canvasses several of the most compelling and contentious issues in global media. With a focus on how developments in communication technologies reframe social, cultural, political and economic phenomena, this unit surveys key historical developments to better appreciate and unpack contemporary debates in global media. The unit explores the longstanding link between modernisation, technology and globalisation and considers how communities – at local, national and regional levels – experience and respond to this link. By contextualising debates around cultural imperialism, the digital divide, and capitalist (post-) modernity, the unit explores how this link has affected conceptions of identity, citizenship and empowerment.

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at http://students.mq.edu.au/student_admin/enrolmentguide/academicdates/

Learning Outcomes

  1. Analyse the role that globalised media flows play in affecting and reflecting changing conceptions of social, political and economic identity
  2. Compare how different disciplinary scholars have analyzed the consequences of global media flows
  3. Apply discipline-specific theories and concepts to pertinent contemporary case studies
  4. Explain complex media phenomena with discipline-specific language, and support a discursive position with pertinent literature and evidence
  5. Demonstrate an ability to critically discuss and creatively present ideas orally while engaging in the process of learning

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Due
Participation 20% Ongoing
Presentation 20% To Be Determined
Essay Plan 25% Friday, Apr 7, 5pm (Week 6)
Major Essay 35% Friday, June 9, 5pm (week 13).

Participation

Due: Ongoing
Weighting: 20%

For this assessment, you are required to actively contribute to class discussions. Contributions should demonstrate an ability to articulate and share ideas on concepts that are raised in the set readings, lecture, and student presentations, and should demonstrate careful consideration of the issues and debates relating to the weekly topic. Participation also involves asking questions, offering pertinent examples and debating critical issues. You will be assessed on how well your contributions to the class discussion reflect critical engagement with the unit and how well they enhance respectful, cross-cultural dialogue on these themes.

To demonstrate your engagement with the readings, it is essential that you do the readings before attending the seminar for that week. Come to class each week with a brief note (typed, single-spaced, not more than a half page) on the most insightful idea from each reading and be able to explain why it was interesting for you. The note should also include a question or comment on what more you would like to know about the topic. The notes may be collected in random weeks, while in other weeks you may be asked to share them orally. You may bring other notes for your own reference which are not handed in.

In the middle of the semester you will be asked to do a brief presentation of your final project. You are expected to share your ongoing research and provide constructive feedback to your peers.

The criteria for this assessment are:

* Communication: ability to effectively articulate complex ideas, concepts and theories through clear explanations and examples to a culturally diverse group

* Synthesis: ability to creatively connect ideas relating to the key concerns of the unit from the readings, lecture and other sources

* Engagement: ability to positively enhance the liveliness of class discussions and share personal insights that enrich the quality of the cross-cultural dialogue on the set topics; well-prepared to contribute each week with relevant and insightful notes on key learnings from the readings and questions and comments aimed at sparking further debate and learning on the topic 

The teacher's progressive weekly notes on contributions in these 3 areas will be used to formulate students' final participation marks. Students may be required to clearly display their name badge so that their contributions can be easily and correctly assigned, especially in the early weeks as the tutor is getting to know students' names.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Analyse the role that globalised media flows play in affecting and reflecting changing conceptions of social, political and economic identity
  • Compare how different disciplinary scholars have analyzed the consequences of global media flows
  • Apply discipline-specific theories and concepts to pertinent contemporary case studies
  • Explain complex media phenomena with discipline-specific language, and support a discursive position with pertinent literature and evidence
  • Demonstrate an ability to critically discuss and creatively present ideas orally while engaging in the process of learning

Presentation

Due: To Be Determined
Weighting: 20%

Each week, 2-3 students (depending on class numbers) will work together in a group to facilitate a class discussion lasting roughly 50 minutes. Using the weekly set readings as a foundation, these students will organise the seminar discussion around the concepts, examples and debates they believe are most relevant to the weekly topic. Additional material should be drawn upon so students can make use of existing audio-visual facilities in the room. Students are expected to come up with creative formats for the discussions that actively involve all students in the class and require them to discuss issues of critical concern for that week. Each presenter should be involved in explaining at least one key concept to the class, using pertinent and original examples to illustrate the concept, and facilitating small group and/or whole class discussions and/or activities around these concepts. 

Please note that this group exercise is marked individually, so all presenters should ensure they have a role in both presenting ideas and facilitating discussion

The criteria for this assessment are:

* Communication: ability to clearly articulate complex concepts, theories and ideas in a way that connects with a culturally-diverse audience

* Pertinence: ability to illustrate key themes and concepts with relevant case studies and/or examples

* Engagement: ability to facilitate and sustain class discussion in a way that encourages the insightful participation of all students

Presentations will take place in class in the second hour of the seminar.

 


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Analyse the role that globalised media flows play in affecting and reflecting changing conceptions of social, political and economic identity
  • Compare how different disciplinary scholars have analyzed the consequences of global media flows
  • Apply discipline-specific theories and concepts to pertinent contemporary case studies
  • Explain complex media phenomena with discipline-specific language, and support a discursive position with pertinent literature and evidence
  • Demonstrate an ability to critically discuss and creatively present ideas orally while engaging in the process of learning

Essay Plan

Due: Friday, Apr 7, 5pm (Week 6)
Weighting: 25%

As preparation for the Major Essay (see below), each student must submit a two-part essay plan based on their chosen essay topic. This includes:

Part 1 - Annotated resource list (with a total of 7-8 key texts that will be used in the essay). 

First provide a full reference (in Harvard or APA style) for the 6 most pertinent academic references you have found to date (i.e. academic books, articles, chapters, reports), which have helped you to explain a key concept or theory and have helped you contextualize your study (e.g. other studies which are focused on similar case studies in the same country you are examining or on the same case study in different countries). Under each reference provide a 100 word description of what aspects of that text are most useful (e.g. specific theories, quotes, ideas etc.) and how you will use these ideas in your essay. Then include full references for 1-2 highly pertinent media texts that you will analyse in your essay (e.g. TV advertisements, Facebook pages, a particular organisation's website, pertinent online reports etc.). Provide a 100 word explanation for each of these, explaining why you have chosen them as worthwhile case studies to examine the selected question. These media texts will form the primary data for your original analysis.  

Part 2 - Essay Outline

The essay outline should present the main proposed argument of the essay, as well as the key points that will be discussed. The outline is to be approximately 250 words long. There should be a clear link between Parts 1 and 2.

The criteria for this assessment are:

* Reading and research: ability to locate and select relevant, logical and comprehensive research sources 

* Synthesis: ability to integrate the unit's themes and concerns with selected academic and media sources in a nuanced, insightful and creative way 

* Argument: ability to propose a logical and demonstrable thesis 

Submission

Essay Plans are to be submitted electronically via Turnitin on ilearn.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Analyse the role that globalised media flows play in affecting and reflecting changing conceptions of social, political and economic identity
  • Compare how different disciplinary scholars have analyzed the consequences of global media flows
  • Apply discipline-specific theories and concepts to pertinent contemporary case studies
  • Explain complex media phenomena with discipline-specific language, and support a discursive position with pertinent literature and evidence

Major Essay

Due: Friday, June 9, 5pm (week 13).
Weighting: 35%

Write a 2500-word essay response to one of these questions:

1. As a way to explain the similarity of cultural trends around the world, is the discourse of cultural imperialism useful and valid? Base your response on an example (or examples) from one nation.

2. How does the concept of 'glocalization' frame the relationship between globalizing forces and local agents with the global cultural economy? Illustrate your response with an example (or examples) from at least one nation.

3. How do global advertisers appeal to the cultural preferences of consumers in developing regions or emerging economic hotspots? Illustrate your response with an example (or examples) from one nation.

4. How have notions of identity and citizenship changed over the last two decades? Illustrate your response with an example of a political movement and/or event from one nation.

5. Has the growth in digital social media expanded opportunities for political expression and/or activity around the world? Illustrate your response with an example (or examples) from one nation.

The criteria for this assessment are:

* Reading & research: ability to critically engage with a range of well-selected pertinent academic material (books, journals, the internet, media sources, archives etc.) in a way that provides evidence of thorough research

* Argument & analysis: ability to present a well-articulated and well-supported argument that effectively synthesizes academic readings with selected media sources

* Writing & structure: ability to write clearly, with a logical structure in a way that is free from grammatical, punctuation, and spelling errors, and has complete and correct referencing

Submission

Essays are to be submitted electronically via Turnitin on ilearn.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Analyse the role that globalised media flows play in affecting and reflecting changing conceptions of social, political and economic identity
  • Compare how different disciplinary scholars have analyzed the consequences of global media flows
  • Apply discipline-specific theories and concepts to pertinent contemporary case studies
  • Explain complex media phenomena with discipline-specific language, and support a discursive position with pertinent literature and evidence

Delivery and Resources

Seminars

ICOM 811 consists of a 2-hour seminar. Each seminar will begin with an introduction of key concepts/ questions from the lecturer. Then, it will be followed by a student-led interactive presentation, class discussion, and group activities.

Students are required to read the assigned electronic readings for that week before class, make notes on the readings and bring them to class so that they are prepared for the discussions. 

Seminars begin in week 1.

It is students' responsibility to stay abreast of course developments and announcements via regular engagement with iLearn.

Required Readings

Required readings will be available through the Library website, linked from the unit iLearn page.

Technology Required

Students are expected to have access to the unit's ilearn website and strong skills in accessing academic and media resources electronically via the library and Internet more broadly. Students not familiar with accessing scholarly resources via the Macquarie University library are expected to seek assistance from Macquarie University librarians as soon as possible upon commencing the unit (or prior) and ensure they receive appropriate training.  

 

Unit Schedule

UNIT SCHEDULE

Week 1: Introduction

This week we'll canvass the various issues and debates that we'll be studying this semester; we'll discuss the assessments for ICOM 811; and we'll organize the groups and schedule for the presentation assignment.

Week 2: Global Communication: paradigms & perspectives

This week we consider how communications figures within the logic and language of development. There are numerous ways that development is understood and/or endorsed, and this has important implications for the role and value of communications. As an introductory overview of this complex field, this week's reading provides the foundation for many of the debates and discussions that we'll consider this semester.

Week 3: Cultural Imperialism: a relevant discourse?

This week, we consider one of the most significant areas in the literature of international communication: the discourse of cultural imperialism. As an influential argument against the political economy of 20th and 21st century communications, this discourse renders the relationship between global media and cultural sovereignty problematic, if not untenable. We'll therefore survey its relevance, validity and influence.

Week 4: Glocalization: when the global meets the local

In the past two decades, numerous researchers and theorists have discussed how globalizing forces intersect with local/national forces with unexpected and/or interesting consequences. This week we consider this phenomenon, and examine its implications in light of competing versions or perceptions of globalization.

Week 5: The Digital Turn: inequities & opportunities

Much of the literature and research on contemporary global communications centres on the role and effects of digital technologies. This week, we'll see how key components of this discourse – including cyber cultures, online identities, interactive and convergent media, and media mobility – have affected how local/national agents navigate 21st century conditions, and have manipulated these technologies to pursue particular types of development.

Week 6: The Commercial Realm: Global Consumer Culture

One of the most compelling and dominant forces in international communications is commercial media – specifically, advertising. This week, we'll see how advertising, branding, public relations and marketing generally affect citizens' loyalties, aspirations and motivations.

Week 7: Cultural Identities

This week, we'll explore and unpack how global communications imbue national citizens with new senses of identity, and the effects this has on empowerment – individual, national and regional. We'll integrate the various strands and examples we've considered so far in the course, to see how the communications media of the 21st century creates notions of a global citizenry, and extrapolate the consequences for different kinds of identity expression.

Week 8: Creative Industries: a post-industrial world?

As more nations engage with industries and endeavours commonly associated with the Information Age, the premium on creativity and innovation grows. This week, we'll see how this imperative – to exploit the economic benefits of the creative industries – has political, social and cultural consequences, and we'll identify how this process has broadened (and complicated) definitions of development.

Week 9: Nation Branding: selling a competitive identity

Nation branding points to the various ways which nations 'speak' and 'behave' – or the range of contact points that link consumers with a place, and how these encounters affect perceptions of it, or its 'strategic equity'. This week, we consider how the notion of branding is being used by certain nations in their quest for a competitive identity in an increasingly globalised world.

Week 10: Neo-Orientalism

For many of us, knowledge of global affairs and international politics comes from news media, especially about places we've never been or people with whom we've had little direct contact. This week we consider the role news and current affairs media plays in shaping perceptions of the 'Other', particularly in a post 9/11 (or September 11) world.

Week 11: Social Media & emerging political practices

Many of us now use social media as part of everyday communication – things like Facebook, Twitter and YouTube are how many of us consume, produce and share media. However this week's discussion considers how social media has affected political activity and expression, with case studies based on the Arab Spring and Occupy Wall Street. We consider whether social media offers new opportunities for political debate and expression, or if it largely mirrors existing distributions of media and/or political power.

Week 12: Global Cultural Convergence

This week we revisit many of the issues and debates we've considered all semester and test them against the logic and language of global cultural convergence.

Week 13: Essay Consultations

Policies and Procedures

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central. Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Academic Honesty Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/academic_honesty/policy.html

Assessment Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/assessment/policy_2016.html

Grade Appeal Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/gradeappeal/policy.html

Complaint Management Procedure for Students and Members of the Public http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/complaint_management/procedure.html​

Disruption to Studies Policy http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/disruption_studies/policy.html The Disruption to Studies Policy is effective from March 3 2014 and replaces the Special Consideration Policy.

In addition, a number of other policies can be found in the Learning and Teaching Category of Policy Central.

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/support/student_conduct/

Results

Results shown in iLearn, or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent. For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au.

What is required to complete this unit satisfactorily

Assessment tasks are aligned to the unit Learning Outcomes. Timely submission of assessment tasks is a unit requirement or penalties apply. 

You are required to attend all tutorials. As participation in the process of learning is linked to and underpins the unit Learning Outcomes, you will need to either apply for Disruptions to Studies to cover any missed tutorial (if the disruption is greater than three consecutive days) or supply appropriate documentation to your unit convenor for any missed tutorial (if less than three consecutive days). 

Late Penalties

Tasks above 10%. Students who submit late work without an extension will receive a penalty of 10% per day. This penalty does not apply for cases in which an application for Disruption to Studies is made and approved.

Additional information

MMCCS website https://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/faculties_and_departments/faculty_of_arts/department_of_media_music_communication_and_cultural_studies/

MMCCS Session Re-mark Application http://www.mq.edu.au/pubstatic/public/download/?id=167914

Information is correct at the time of publication

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Learning Skills

Learning Skills (mq.edu.au/learningskills) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to improve your marks and take control of your study.

Student Enquiry Service

For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at ask.mq.edu.au

Equity Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

IT Help

For help with University computer systems and technology, visit http://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/information_technology/help/

When using the University's IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use of IT Resources Policy. The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network including students.

Graduate Capabilities

PG - Capable of Professional and Personal Judgment and Initiative

Our postgraduates will demonstrate a high standard of discernment and common sense in their professional and personal judgment. They will have the ability to make informed choices and decisions that reflect both the nature of their professional work and their personal perspectives.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Assessment tasks

  • Participation
  • Presentation
  • Essay Plan
  • Major Essay

PG - Discipline Knowledge and Skills

Our postgraduates will be able to demonstrate a significantly enhanced depth and breadth of knowledge, scholarly understanding, and specific subject content knowledge in their chosen fields.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Analyse the role that globalised media flows play in affecting and reflecting changing conceptions of social, political and economic identity
  • Compare how different disciplinary scholars have analyzed the consequences of global media flows
  • Apply discipline-specific theories and concepts to pertinent contemporary case studies
  • Explain complex media phenomena with discipline-specific language, and support a discursive position with pertinent literature and evidence

Assessment tasks

  • Participation
  • Presentation
  • Essay Plan
  • Major Essay

PG - Critical, Analytical and Integrative Thinking

Our postgraduates will be capable of utilising and reflecting on prior knowledge and experience, of applying higher level critical thinking skills, and of integrating and synthesising learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments. A characteristic of this form of thinking is the generation of new, professionally oriented knowledge through personal or group-based critique of practice and theory.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Analyse the role that globalised media flows play in affecting and reflecting changing conceptions of social, political and economic identity
  • Compare how different disciplinary scholars have analyzed the consequences of global media flows
  • Demonstrate an ability to critically discuss and creatively present ideas orally while engaging in the process of learning

Assessment tasks

  • Participation
  • Presentation
  • Essay Plan
  • Major Essay

PG - Research and Problem Solving Capability

Our postgraduates will be capable of systematic enquiry; able to use research skills to create new knowledge that can be applied to real world issues, or contribute to a field of study or practice to enhance society. They will be capable of creative questioning, problem finding and problem solving.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Analyse the role that globalised media flows play in affecting and reflecting changing conceptions of social, political and economic identity
  • Compare how different disciplinary scholars have analyzed the consequences of global media flows
  • Apply discipline-specific theories and concepts to pertinent contemporary case studies
  • Explain complex media phenomena with discipline-specific language, and support a discursive position with pertinent literature and evidence
  • Demonstrate an ability to critically discuss and creatively present ideas orally while engaging in the process of learning

Assessment tasks

  • Essay Plan
  • Major Essay

PG - Effective Communication

Our postgraduates will be able to communicate effectively and convey their views to different social, cultural, and professional audiences. They will be able to use a variety of technologically supported media to communicate with empathy using a range of written, spoken or visual formats.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Compare how different disciplinary scholars have analyzed the consequences of global media flows
  • Apply discipline-specific theories and concepts to pertinent contemporary case studies
  • Explain complex media phenomena with discipline-specific language, and support a discursive position with pertinent literature and evidence
  • Demonstrate an ability to critically discuss and creatively present ideas orally while engaging in the process of learning

Assessment tasks

  • Participation
  • Presentation
  • Essay Plan
  • Major Essay

PG - Engaged and Responsible, Active and Ethical Citizens

Our postgraduates will be ethically aware and capable of confident transformative action in relation to their professional responsibilities and the wider community. They will have a sense of connectedness with others and country and have a sense of mutual obligation. They will be able to appreciate the impact of their professional roles for social justice and inclusion related to national and global issues

This graduate capability is supported by:

Assessment tasks

  • Participation
  • Presentation

Changes from Previous Offering

In the previous years, ICOM811 consisted of a one-hour lecture and a one-hour tutorial. This semester the lecture time is replaced by a brief introduction of concepts and questions. There will be more time allocated for discussions and activities in addition to student presentations.

ICOM811 is regularly updated to ensure readings, examples and course content generally reflect contemporary issues in global media. Students are encouraged to consider its implementation and suggestions about how it can be improved are welcome.