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ENVS363 – Environmental Management Project

2017 – S2 Day

General Information

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Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit leader
Professor Mark Patrick Taylor
Contact via mark.taylor@mq.edu.au
E7A, level 4
2-5 pm Thurs - see Unit guide
Tutor
Dr Paul Harvey
Contact via 02 9850 6975
E7A, level 4
2-5 pm Thurs - see Unit guide
Tutor
Marek Rouillon
Contact via 02 9850 8318
E7A level 4
2-5 pm Thurs - see Unit guide
Credit points Credit points
3
Prerequisites Prerequisites
(39cp at 100 level or above) including [(ENV267 or GEOS267) and (ENV300 or GEOP300 or ENVG340 or GEOP340 or ENVE362 or ENVS362)]
Corequisites Corequisites
Co-badged status Co-badged status
Unit description Unit description
This is a simulated work experience unit, where small groups undertake major projects on matters of environmental concern under the supervision of Macquarie staff and experts from outside agencies. Progress reports and a final presentation are made by each group. Much of the project work is undertaken independently and outside formal class hours (the class does not meet every week but there are frequent opportunities for additional advice and supervision with the course convenor).

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at http://students.mq.edu.au/student_admin/enrolmentguide/academicdates/

Learning Outcomes

  1. Design a research program
  2. Create and maintain a group, delegate tasks, accept tasks from colleagues and responsibility for group management
  3. Produce a professional document of the size and complexity required of consultants
  4. Be a confident and professional presenter of information
  5. Further develop a sense of social and environmental awareness

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Due
Presentation 1 10% Week 3
Presentation 2 10% Week 5
Presentation 3 Report summary 10% Week 12
Presentation of final report 10% Week 13
Report 60% Week 13

Presentation 1

Due: Week 3
Weighting: 10%

The Week 3 presentation is more formal, and will be assessed. By then you should have your project defined, methods outlined, internal and external supervisors known, a preliminary visit to the field site (if appropriate), and the whole project described clearly and illustrated. If your group is prevaricating about a project at this stage, I may assign a project and internal supervisor to you. Be aware that if I do this at this stage in the semester, it is compulsory.

For the presentation, aim for ~10 minutes plus ~2 minutes of questions. This is a serious presentation; we will have an electronic lectern and a data projector available. Everyone in the group must take a turn talking; this is part of the assessment. 

This task will be assessed via peer review and marks allocated on an individual basis.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Design a research program
  • Create and maintain a group, delegate tasks, accept tasks from colleagues and responsibility for group management
  • Be a confident and professional presenter of information

Presentation 2

Due: Week 5
Weighting: 10%

The Week 5 presentation is an opportunity to showcase your initial data, and again to help guide you through any issues arising. Again, aim for 10 minutes plus ~2 minutes of questions but this time overview your topic only briefly (that is, don’t repeat much of what you presented in Week 3). What I really want to see is your data (field, lab, whatever) and how far you have progressed beyond Week 3. This presentation will be assessed in the same way as Week 3, and again everyone must take a turn talking because it is part of the assessment

This task will be assessed via peer review and marks allocated on an individual basis.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Create and maintain a group, delegate tasks, accept tasks from colleagues and responsibility for group management
  • Produce a professional document of the size and complexity required of consultants
  • Be a confident and professional presenter of information
  • Further develop a sense of social and environmental awareness

Presentation 3 Report summary

Due: Week 12
Weighting: 10%

The Week 12 summary is to be provided so that I can assemble and print a booklet to hand to students and supervisors at the Week 13 presentation. One page is sufficient to set out your Research Question(s), methods and major findings. For ideas of how to construct summaries, simply review relevant journal articles or research reports in the field related to your project.

This task will be assessed via peer review and marks allocated on an individual basis.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Design a research program
  • Create and maintain a group, delegate tasks, accept tasks from colleagues and responsibility for group management
  • Produce a professional document of the size and complexity required of consultants

Presentation of final report

Due: Week 13
Weighting: 10%

The Week 13 presentation is your concluding presentation of your project; and needs to cover the issues examined and the findings and conclusions/recommendations. You may also considered include suggests for future work/investigation, as required. The presentation should also include reflections on the successes / failures of the project and how you would revise the approach you have taken on reflection. This presentation should be of a high standard, and again everyone in the group must have a turn presenting various aspects. 

Invitations will be extended to internal and external supervisors to attend. Given that some people will not have seen your presentation before, your talk needs to be inclusive of your whole project, i.e. covering aims to conclusions. Aim for ~10 minutes of presentation, plus 2 minutes of questions.

This task will be assessed via peer review and marks allocated on an individual basis.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Design a research program
  • Create and maintain a group, delegate tasks, accept tasks from colleagues and responsibility for group management
  • Produce a professional document of the size and complexity required of consultants
  • Be a confident and professional presenter of information

Report

Due: Week 13
Weighting: 60%

The Final report should reflect your project research outcomes. Formats and outputs may vary from a scientific paper like in a journal, to a report that includes a final copy of a pamphlet, to a short video. The possibilities are huge. See my thoughts on expected standards and issues with group work. You are to produce at least two copies of the final report; I will retain one and the other will be sent to your external supervisor, along with a thank-you note from me for acting as an external supervisor. You are required to hand in two copies, bound and finalised. Details of the external supervisor and their organisation should be included at the front end of the report. Please provide a suitable envelope addressed to your external supervisor so that a copy of the report can be posted to them in due course.

* There is no word limit set for the Final Report, but being succinct and using relevant information will keep the report length to a sensible length. However, it is expected that a report's work will reflect the minimum requirement to spend 150 hours per student on this unit. So if your group has four students that is 600 hours in total. 

The marks (60 total) for this final assessment task will be as follows:

50% (30 marks) will be allocated on an individual basis from peer review assessment;

50% (30 marks) will be allocated on a group basis following the Unit convenor's assessment of the whole report.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Produce a professional document of the size and complexity required of consultants
  • Further develop a sense of social and environmental awareness

Delivery and Resources

ENVS363 occupies a 3 hour teaching block on Thursday from 2 pm to 5 pm, in the C5A 310 Tutorial Room. We only meet formally four times in the semester so that you have ample time to read and carry out your research project. Please refer to the Unit timetable below, for further guidance. If I request a meeting with a group outside of these designated four meetings outlined in this unit guide, consider it to be compulsory, given that there will be a good reason for it – such as insufficient evidence of progress that needs to be discussed.

You and your group have to give three presentations (Weeks 3, 5 and 13), submit a short project summary (Week 12) and two copies of a bound Final Report (Week 13). In addition, reflecting and responding to the needs of previous group projects, I have scheduled 3 consultation weeks (weeks 6, 9, 11) for group meetings as required by appointment. I request that we stick to the scheduled available times for meetings for this Unit. For any other queries, I can be contacted on mark.taylor@mq.edu.au.

The University expects that you devote 9 hours per week (over the 15 week session), in total, to a 3 credit point unit such as ENVS363. Put another way, you should be able to achieve a passing grade with around 150 hours for the semester. A rough breakdown for EACH person might be as follows:

Classroom: 4 x 3 hours = 12 hours

Group project meetings: 8 x ~ 1 hours (including preparation time) = 8 hours.

Individual/group research: 130 hours

Total: 150 hours

There is no set textbook or reading list for this unit, due to the varied nature of the projects that are carried out.

Unit Schedule

Week 1 (3 August 2017) - Introductory lecture and project definition, selection and confirmation

Week 3 (17 August 2017) - Presentation - topic overview

Week 5 (31 August 2017) - Presentation - data collected/other measures of progress presented

Week 6,9,11 - *Additional consultations as requested by groups – for times  **see below

Week 7 - Optional meeting for groups – time TBA

Week 10 - Optional meeting for groups – time TBA

Week 12 (2 November 2017) - Optional meeting for groups – time TBA

Week 13 (9 November 2017) - Final presentations - “Industry day” (external supervisors are welcome to attend as they are for previous sessions).

 

*For consultations outside of scheduled meeting times it is requested that appointments are made for Thursday between 2 pm - 5.00 pm so that you can be assured of having time to discuss your study.

Policies and Procedures

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central. Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Academic Honesty Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/academic_honesty/policy.html

Assessment Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/assessment/policy_2016.html

Grade Appeal Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/gradeappeal/policy.html

Complaint Management Procedure for Students and Members of the Public http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/complaint_management/procedure.html​

Disruption to Studies Policy http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/disruption_studies/policy.html The Disruption to Studies Policy is effective from March 3 2014 and replaces the Special Consideration Policy.

In addition, a number of other policies can be found in the Learning and Teaching Category of Policy Central.

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/support/student_conduct/

Results

Results shown in iLearn, or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent. For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au.

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Learning Skills

Learning Skills (mq.edu.au/learningskills) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to improve your marks and take control of your study.

Student Enquiry Service

For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at ask.mq.edu.au

Equity Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

IT Help

For help with University computer systems and technology, visit http://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/information_technology/help/

When using the University's IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use of IT Resources Policy. The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network including students.

Graduate Capabilities

Discipline Specific Knowledge and Skills

Our graduates will take with them the intellectual development, depth and breadth of knowledge, scholarly understanding, and specific subject content in their chosen fields to make them competent and confident in their subject or profession. They will be able to demonstrate, where relevant, professional technical competence and meet professional standards. They will be able to articulate the structure of knowledge of their discipline, be able to adapt discipline-specific knowledge to novel situations, and be able to contribute from their discipline to inter-disciplinary solutions to problems.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Produce a professional document of the size and complexity required of consultants
  • Be a confident and professional presenter of information
  • Further develop a sense of social and environmental awareness

Assessment tasks

  • Presentation 1
  • Presentation 2
  • Presentation 3 Report summary
  • Presentation of final report
  • Report

Critical, Analytical and Integrative Thinking

We want our graduates to be capable of reasoning, questioning and analysing, and to integrate and synthesise learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments; to be able to critique constraints, assumptions and limitations; to be able to think independently and systemically in relation to scholarly activity, in the workplace, and in the world. We want them to have a level of scientific and information technology literacy.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • Produce a professional document of the size and complexity required of consultants

Assessment tasks

  • Presentation 2
  • Presentation 3 Report summary
  • Presentation of final report
  • Report

Problem Solving and Research Capability

Our graduates should be capable of researching; of analysing, and interpreting and assessing data and information in various forms; of drawing connections across fields of knowledge; and they should be able to relate their knowledge to complex situations at work or in the world, in order to diagnose and solve problems. We want them to have the confidence to take the initiative in doing so, within an awareness of their own limitations.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • Design a research program

Assessment tasks

  • Presentation 1
  • Presentation 3 Report summary
  • Presentation of final report

Effective Communication

We want to develop in our students the ability to communicate and convey their views in forms effective with different audiences. We want our graduates to take with them the capability to read, listen, question, gather and evaluate information resources in a variety of formats, assess, write clearly, speak effectively, and to use visual communication and communication technologies as appropriate.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Create and maintain a group, delegate tasks, accept tasks from colleagues and responsibility for group management
  • Produce a professional document of the size and complexity required of consultants
  • Be a confident and professional presenter of information

Assessment tasks

  • Presentation 1
  • Presentation 2
  • Presentation 3 Report summary
  • Presentation of final report
  • Report

Engaged and Ethical Local and Global citizens

As local citizens our graduates will be aware of indigenous perspectives and of the nation's historical context. They will be engaged with the challenges of contemporary society and with knowledge and ideas. We want our graduates to have respect for diversity, to be open-minded, sensitive to others and inclusive, and to be open to other cultures and perspectives: they should have a level of cultural literacy. Our graduates should be aware of disadvantage and social justice, and be willing to participate to help create a wiser and better society.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • Further develop a sense of social and environmental awareness

Assessment tasks

  • Presentation 2
  • Report

Socially and Environmentally Active and Responsible

We want our graduates to be aware of and have respect for self and others; to be able to work with others as a leader and a team player; to have a sense of connectedness with others and country; and to have a sense of mutual obligation. Our graduates should be informed and active participants in moving society towards sustainability.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • Further develop a sense of social and environmental awareness

Assessment tasks

  • Presentation 2
  • Report

Capable of Professional and Personal Judgement and Initiative

We want our graduates to have emotional intelligence and sound interpersonal skills and to demonstrate discernment and common sense in their professional and personal judgement. They will exercise initiative as needed. They will be capable of risk assessment, and be able to handle ambiguity and complexity, enabling them to be adaptable in diverse and changing environments.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • Create and maintain a group, delegate tasks, accept tasks from colleagues and responsibility for group management

Assessment tasks

  • Presentation 1
  • Presentation 2
  • Presentation 3 Report summary
  • Presentation of final report

Commitment to Continuous Learning

Our graduates will have enquiring minds and a literate curiosity which will lead them to pursue knowledge for its own sake. They will continue to pursue learning in their careers and as they participate in the world. They will be capable of reflecting on their experiences and relationships with others and the environment, learning from them, and growing - personally, professionally and socially.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • Further develop a sense of social and environmental awareness

Assessment tasks

  • Presentation 2
  • Report

Changes from Previous Offering

The unit ENVS363 now reflects the University's new policy on group work. In this sense, the unit now includes individual grading for all assessment tasks required by the unit.

Individual grades will be derived from peer review assessment and will comprise 70% of the unit, with 30% allocated for group work.

The group work component is based on assessment of the final report.

The peer review assessments will be subject to evaluation by the Unit convenor to determine marks are aligned with the assessment comments and that they are consistent and reasonable. In this regard, they may be subject to moderation.

Aims

  • To create experience in solving applied problems
  • To create industry linkages
  • To cement group work/social interaction skills
  • To foster a research culture
  • To become an effective and confident communicator, particularly in public speaking
  • To continue to become socially and environmentally aware and responsible

Assessment Overview

In small groups, you will define projects in conjunction with the Unit convenor and your supervisor, that have the following parameters;

1. A research question(s) on a matter of environmental concern - these are not prescriptive, so there’s no point in writing down too many guidelines here. You will need to consult with the convenor and your internal supervisor to determine if your ideas are appropriate. If you have absolutely no ideas, I will make suggestions and in extreme circumstances I will allocate projects.

2. Methods that are able to address the question(s).

3. An internal supervisor.

4. An external (industry, agency, etc) supervisor.

We will formerly meet at Weeks 1, 3, 5 and 13, and your group will give formal presentations at Weeks 3, 5 and 13. The presentations on Weeks 3 and 5 are opportunities for feedback, when your peers have an opportunity to have input into your project design. Additional meetings will be available in weeks 6,7, 9-12 with Prof Taylor to assist with project management and design issues (see details below). Please invite your internal supervisor to all presentations, and your external supervisor (as well) to the final presentation.

The Week 1 meeting is informal. At this meeting, I will overview past projects, expected standards, get groups together if they aren’t already sorted, approve projects for those who already have their ideas resolved. I will be looking for who knows what they are doing, who doesn’t, and to have initial quality control on the projects.

The presentations in Week 3, 5,13 are more formal, and will be assessed.

By Week 3 you should have your project defined, methods outlined, internal and external supervisors known, a preliminary visit to the field site (if appropriate), and the whole concept described clearly and illustrated. If your group is prevaricating about a project at Week 3 stage, I may assign a project and internal supervisor to you. Be aware that if I do this at this stage in the session, it is compulsory due to time constraints.

For the presentations, aim for ~10 minutes plus ~2 minutes of questions. This is a serious presentation; we will have an electronic lectern and a data projector available. Everyone in the group must take a turn talking; this is part of the assessment.

Week 13 will also requiring handing on your final report - details are provided above in this Unit guide about expectations. Addition information is also provided in the lecture in week 1.

 

Assignment Assessment Criteria

The template for the individual peer review assignments are provided on the Unit website.

Students are required to fill out using the word template, print off and hand in their peer assessment review forms to the Unit convenor.

The assessment criteria ALSO requires all students in all groups to turn up and present at the three sessions in weeks 3, 5, 13. Not turning up means the task is incomplete and cannot be marked i.e. if an individual does not turn up or provide a bona fide medical certificate, the result for that assignment will be zero (0), irrespective of the comments and marks provided by the peer review assessment. In summary, turning up and participating in the presentations is integral to the assessment tasks and MUST be completed to achieve marks greater than zero for that task.

Peer review overview (full template will be uploaded onto the unit web site)

Group projects enable students to develop different skills to those acquired via individual study. These can include team building, communication, negotiation and respect, acceptance for different perspectives. Effective teamwork involves developing a process within the group to facilitate communication for all parties so that all group members can contribute to the task and end product. The reality of the work place is such that you will have to work with and for others who may not be aligned entirely with your view of the world. Moreover, individuals will have different skills sets, expectations, standards, goals and work ethics. It is a learnt skill to be able to navigate project personnel with such differences to reach the end goal of your project.

Peer evaluation is one way to evaluate team processes. Group members should know how well their group has functioned and be across the relative contribution of each member of the group. Contribution to a group dynamic and outcome is multifaceted: it involves generating ideas and processes for project success; undertaking research and finding resources; completing agreed tasks on schedule; taking notes and supporting group processes; turning up on time to meetings and contributing positively; and adopting leadership and responsibility. The end goal (e.g. class presentation, summary report, final report) requires persistent and consistent effort across the semester in order to achieve a good group outcome.

Instructions

To arrive at a fair assessment for group tasks, students should reflect on the relative contribution of themselves and each group member in their project group using the peer evaluation guide and the University grading system set out below.

Also consider attitudes, such as willingness to perform tasks, dedication, enthusiasm, and use of initiative. For the assessment of themselves and each group member, use the template set out below to:

  1. answer the five yes/no questions
  2. provide a mark out of 10 for the contribution of the individual to the group (use whole or half numbers i.e. 7 or 7.5 bearing mind what these mean in grade terms)
  3. justify your mark with brief comments.

Peer evaluation guide (i.e. not an exclusive list)

Quantity and quality of individual contributions

  1. attended and contributed to field work/data analysis/group discussions
  2. completed tasks – bearing in mind their size and importance
  3. completed tasks on time, efficiently and correctly as agreed
  4. completed tasks in professional manner – i.e. useful and error free
  5. used initiative to complete tasks
  6. articulated gaps, opportunities and relevant issues to the group

Contribution to group

  1. provided useful and relevant suggestions; had good ideas; active in discussions; enthusiastic, participated actively and effectively
  2. used clear communication – verbal and written
  3. negotiated and respected opinions and contributions of others
  4. showed leadership and carriage of tasks; reliable and trustworthy
  5. demonstrated problem-solving skills
  6. assisted in collective decision-making
  7. worked well with others

 

Grading (as per the University schedule for grades)

Grade

Mark

High Distinction (85-100%)

8.5 – 10

Distinction (75-84%)

7.0 – 8.4

Credit (65-74%)

6.5 – 7.4

Pass (50-64%)

5 – 6.5

Fail (<50%)

< 5

 

Each group member will be given a mark out of 10 for their contribution to each of the assessment tasks, which will go toward their final mark. In addition, individuals will be asked to mark themselves as part of the assessment. All of the marks per individual from across the group will then be evaluated and compiled into a single final mark for each assessment task.

Yes/no answers to be answered by group members as part of the assessment

Attribute

Evaluation

YES / NO

1. Participation/Responsiveness 

Did the group member participate in group tasks?

 

2. Team Support

Did the group member help to create a positive group experience?

 

3. Initiative

Did the group member take the initiative to seek out, and do, tasks and responsibilities?

 

4. Effectiveness

Was the group member effective and valuable for accomplishing the group assessment task?

 

5. Knowledge and experience

Did the group member share knowledge and experience that benefitted the group?

 

The above evaluation will then be followed by a mark out of 10 for the assessment task, supported by brief justifying comments.

We require your responses to the above assessment by 1700 hours the day after the presentation using the new software for this purpose (to be detailed in class). If responses are not in on time then zero will be allocated.

Please note that because all work is group work then in the ultimate students will only receive a Pass or Fail for this unit, irrespective of the cumulative marks for the various components of the Unit.

 

Week 12 summary and Week 13 Final Report:

    Addressing the question that is asked by you with a well-developed discussion of the topic, and its implications, that place the topic in a broader context.

    Using and citing a wide range of literature, including texts, research papers, and grey literature.

    Demonstrating good planning with a clear structure, headings, and a logical argument based firmly on the literature cited.

    Presenting a legible paper (where appropriate) with correct grammar and spelling, and correct use of professional terminology as appropriate (note that I expect word processing of the Final Report).

     Using correct SI units, and correct abbreviations.

     Referring to figures and tables in the text, with full and appropriate titles on each figure and table, irrelevant material is omitted, sources are given.

    Citing references acceptably, correctly and consistently in the text as well as in the reference list, no abbreviations, and correct citation of chapters in edited books.

     Being concise is a virtue; if you can make your point/s with fewer words, please do so.

    Handing in on time.

    Completing a report with adequate detail that represents the time for this unit for EACH student. 

     Each FINAL report must include the contribution of each individual student (clearly identified in the report) i.e.  

          -  a chapter / section clearly identifying which student is the author for that section in a written format report, OR  

          -  an on screen presentation or narration of the students contribution (clearly identified) to the FINAL report.

The individual contribution component of the assessment for ENVS363 is 70% and the group mark (based on the final report) is 30%.

  • There is no exam for this unit – it is 100% course work i.e. your project and the final mark is satisfactory/fail - no SNG (standard numerical grade) is assigned to the final grade the unit).

If you experience difficulty achieving a good standard in your written presentation, please talk to me. The University offers a variety of writing courses and sources of advice that may help you.

Assignment extensions and penalties

Failure to attend the presentations without justification means that your personal mark will be zero for that piece of assessment. The rest of the group will not be penalised for non-attendance of a group member. The final report must be completed and submitted, on time and in full, in order to receive credit. Late assignments must be handed personally to me, and they will be penalised 10% of the assignment grade per day or part thereof, beginning at 0900 hours, not at some time later in the day. Late days include weekends. This penalty will be imposed if required. Allowing a group to hand the final report in late is unfair to those who meet the deadlines.

Attendance at the presentations and the deadline for the final report are not negotiable. Only a medical certificate or a letter with appropriate supporting documents outlining other serious extenuating circumstances can be used to avoid penalties associated with non-attendance or late/non-submissions of the report. Let me know of problems in advance or as soon as possible, not after the event: I am likely to be more sympathetic and flexible in my requirements if you follow this advice.  

Grading approach and policy

As noted elsewhere in this Unit guide, assessment will comply with the standard University grading policy and its descriptors:

https://staff.mq.edu.au/work/strategy-planning-and-governance/university-policies-and-procedures/policies/assessment-in-effect-from-session-2-2016

 

Examples of Specific skills (depends on project)

 

  • Fieldwork/laboratory skills
  • Chemical analysis skills
  • Writing a major report to a professional standard
  • Learning to make presentations (via Powerpoint or similar) to a professional standard
  • Learning to give presentations, articulated clearly and professionally

 

Final Results

The assessment in ENVS363 leads to a raw percentage mark, which I use to then assign a grade of either Satisfactory or Unsatisfactory. This is required by the University Policy on group work (see the Handbook of Undergraduate Studies). This result does not contribute to your grade point average. Feedback will also come in the form of comments given to you verbally at the meetings or emailed directly to you, as well as general commentaries directed to the entire class (either in class or via an email list).

Generic Skills

Addressing others appropriately is an important component of engagement. With respect to emailing or speaking to internal staff and external clients it would be good professional practice to refer to them by their title at least in the first instance - e.g.: "Dear Dr Smith". It is not appropriate to consult with a senior person/colleague/mentor who you are not familiar with by not using their name. The use of a generic introduction e.g. "Hey" or "Hi" is not appropriate and nor is "SMS style" writing in emails. If you want to elicit a response to your questions please address the person/organisation appropriately and respectfully. This is good practice for your professional career.  Other generic skills:

  • Planning and executing research
  • Group management and cooperation
  • Developing industry linkages
  • Oral presentation skills
  • Report preparation
  • Synthesis of literature

 

 

Handing in Final Report

You are required to keep at least one backup copy of the final version of your Final Report. Please submit two bound copies of your Final Report to me in the classroom. The supervisors full contact details must be included. If your Report is late and without a formal extension granted, it must be handed to me (not left under the office door). It is in your interest to hand in your work on time. If you wish to hand in your summary or Final Report late and you have a medical certificate, you must give it to me. If you know or suspect that you are going to hand in your work late, please talk with me. Unless there is the appropriate documentation, late submissions will be penalised or not marked. The final reports will not be returned – I keep one and I will give the other to your internal supervisor. Note that you may wish to give one to your external supervisor as well.

Issues with Group Work

Group work can be fun and rewarding, and can build very strong relationships for future collaboration in the workplace. I really believe that a strength of this unit is the generic skills you will learn in group project management. Most importantly though, you can use individual strengths of the different team members to enhance project outcomes.

I expect all group members to contribute equally, although it is up to each group to determine what the individual contributions should be. I know that it is sometimes difficult to work in groups. However, the workplace offers little flexibility as to who your colleagues are, and at some stage in the future you will have to work alongside someone you don’t really like. My advice is to try to respect them even if you do not like them, and make place for their opinions and efforts in the team. In a team situation, like ENVS363, it best to allocate tasks according to individual skills, interests and abilities. Taking notes at group meetings and emailing out the agreed tasks and timeframes is a good way to keep track of what has been agreed, who is to what tasks and by what date those task have been agreed to be completed. This information maybe useful for resolving any disagreements of who is / is not contributing. In all cases, communication is the key to success in this program. In ENVS363, if I even catch a hint that a group is excluding someone from group activities, I shall respond. Please talk with the Unit convenor (Prof M Taylor) if there are issues.

PACE - Participation

ENVS363 has been accredited as a PACE unit from 2013. PACE stands for Professional and Community Engagement and it is a key component of the University's strategic direction, emphasising the University's commitment to excellence in research, learning and teaching and community engagement. PACE units provide an academic framework through which students can engage with the community, learn through participation, develop their capabilities and build on the skills that employers value. By connecting students with partner organisations, PACE gives Macquarie students the chance to contribute their academic learning, enthusiasm and fresh perspective to the professional workplace. Through PACE units, students undertake a PACE activity – the experiential component of a PACE unit whereby students engage with the community through participation. The activity can be carried out in a variety of modes such as block (a concentrated period) or over the course of the whole session (i.e. limited hours per week).  Similarly, the timing of the PACE activity for each student may be different depending on arrangements with the community-based partner. While the Unit Convenor and PACE team will collaborate in establishing certain partners and activities, students of ENVS363 may also have the opportunity to identify partner organisations.  All projects proposed must be approved by the Unit Convenor to ensure that students will achieve learning that suits the objectives of this unit. Further, all projects must be formalised including the assessment of Work, Health, and Safety and insurance arrangements.  The PACE team in the Faculty of Science and Engineering will advise and assist in regards to these matters. The website for PACE can be located here:  http://mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/professional_and_community_engagement/. The PACE webpages for the Faculty of Science and Engineering can be found here:  https://www.mq.edu.au/business_and_community/professional_and_community_engagement/contact_us/the_pace_team/.

Pace and Reflective Learning

In terms of reflective learning, the Final Report and presentation for this unit requires students to reflect on the successes and failures of their ENVS363 project. To help facilitate this process of reflection, students should access the Reflection module through iLearn during the period of the unit (in advance of students commencing the Final Report). This module consists of videos involving Macquarie students and staff on the subject of reflection, as well as readings and a practical exercise that can help prepare students for their own reflection. To complete this aspect we suggest you include no more than one page summarising "lessons learnt or reflections on ENVS363."

For the purposes of brevity in the Unit guide we have provided a short summary of the PACE requirements and information and full details will be provided on the Unit website.

Referencing and citations

Referencing and Citations

There are various types of referencing styles. They differ markedly between journals and journal types: medical science journals differ from law journals, which differ again from science journals.

The referencing style in Environmental Pollution is appropriate for this unit. It is simple and clear.

Please format ALL assignments using the method detailed in the published journal articles:

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/journal/02697491

Reference style

Name and year style in the text Text:

All citations in the text should refer to:

1. Single author: the author's name (without initials, unless there is ambiguity) and the year of publication;

2. Two authors: both authors' names and the year of publication;

3. Three or more authors: first author's name followed by 'et al.' and the year of publication. Citations may be made directly (or parenthetically). Groups of references should be listed first alphabetically, then chronologically. Examples: "as demonstrated (Allan, 1996a, 1996b, 1999; Allan and Jones, 1995). Kramer et al. (2000) have recently shown ..."

List:

References should be arranged first alphabetically and then further sorted chronologically if necessary. More than one reference from the same author(s) in the same year must be identified by the letters "a", "b", "c", etc., placed after the year of publication. Note that any (consistent) reference style and format may be used: the Publisher will ensure that the correct style for this journal will be introduced for the proof stages, the final print version and the PDF files for electronic distribution.

Examples:

Reference to a journal publication:

Van der Geer, J., Hanraads, J.A.J., Lupton, R.A., 2000. The art of writing a scientific article. Journal of Scientific Communications 163, 51-59.

Reference to a book:

Strunk Jr., W., White, E.B., 1979. The Elements of Style, third ed. Macmillan, New York.

Reference to a chapter in an edited book:Mettam, G.R., Adams, L.B., 1999. How to prepare an electronic version of your article, in: Jones, B.S., Smith, R.Z. (Eds.), Introduction to the Electronic Age. E-Publishing Inc., New York, pp. 281-304.

Reference to a URL:

NTP (National Toxicology Program), 2012. National Toxicology Program Monograph on Health Effects of Low-level Lead. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. June 13th, 2012. http://ntp.niehs.nih.gov/NTP/ohat/Lead/Final/MonographHealthEffectsLowLevelLead_prepublication_508.pdf (accessed 19 June 2017).

Safety and Ethics

Safety and Ethics

A PACE Activity is an experiential activity allocated to, and undertaken by, a student within a PACE unit which may take place in premises other than the University (usually the Partner Organisation’s premises). When working or studying in non-University premises, the primary responsibility for the health and safety of our students becomes that of the Partner Organisation hosting the student. However, as a student, you also have a legal responsibility under the Workplace Health & Safety Act 2011 and the Macquarie University Health & Safety Policy to ensure the health and safety of yourself and of others in the workplace. Each student has a moral and legal responsibility for ensuring that his or her work environment is conducive to good health and safety, by: 

  • ensuring that their work and work area is without risk to the health and safety of themselves and others
  • complying with the University’s and Partner Organisation’s Work Health & Safety Policy and Procedures
  • reporting hazards and incidents as they occur in accordance with University and Partner Organisation’s policy
  • actively participating in all health and safety activities and briefing sessions (eg emergency evacuation procedures, site inspections etc)

Each student is also required to advise their Unit Convenor or Faculty PACE Manager as soon as possible when:

  • he/she feels unsafe at any stage during the PACE activity
  • he/she did not receive a safety induction prior to the commencement of the activity covering: First aid, Fire and emergency evacuation; and Injury/incident reporting
  • he/she did not receive any specialised instructions/training necessary to carry out the role
  • an incident/accident happens (even when reported to the Partner Organisation/supervisor and managed by them) 

Non-compliance with the above may result in withdrawal of the student from the PACE Activity. Students in the Faculty of Science and Engineering should also be familiar with Faculty-specific practices as appropriate:

http://web.science.mq.edu.au/intranet/ohs/

Ethics issues apply to those whose projects involve:

  • the care and use of animals
  • human participants (including questionnaires, surveys and interviews)
  • biosafety issues, such as recombinant DNA, or
  • potentially infectious and/or hazardous agents

If applicable, you must check the ethics committee websites (Animal Ethics, Biosafety, Ethics Review and Ethical Research) at:  http://www.research.mq.edu.au/current_research_staff/human_research_ethics   and if in doubt, consult your internal supervisor, the University Research Ethics Officer or me as the Unit convenor.

Students should note the information below in case they find themselves in any emergency situations.

1. Remove yourself from any danger.

2. Call 000, if necessary.

3. Speak to your partner-based supervisor, if possible. The Organisation may have emergency procedures to follow.

THEN - if the emergency occurs in office hours (i.e. Monday - Friday 9am-5pm)

4. Contact your Unit Convenor by phone/email as soon as you can.

5. If you cannot reach your Unit Convenor, contact your Faculty PACE Manager by phone/email.

OR - if the emergency occurs outside of office hours (i.e. outside of Monday - Friday 9am-5pm)

6. Phone Campus Security Office on (02) 9850-9999 as soon as you can. This is a 24 hour, 7 days a week service and it does not matter where in Australia you are when you call. Please identify yourself as a PACE student when you call.

N.B. For any minor issues with your participation activity, please speak to your partner-based Supervisor. If the problem is more serious, please contact your Unit Convenor or your Faculty PACE Manager.

If you are experiencing difficulties and need to speak to a counsellor:

Contact the MQ Counselling Service at Campus Wellbeing on 9850-7497 (Monday - Friday, 8am-6pm)

1800 MQ CARELINE (1800-227-367) - information and referral service (24 hours, 7 days a week)

If you would like to speak to a counsellor outside of office hours, you can also contact Lifeline on 13 11 14 (24 hours, 7 days a week).

http://web.science.mq.edu.au/intranet/ohs/

Ethics issues apply to those whose projects involve:

  • the care and use of animals
  • human participants (including questionnaires, surveys and interviews)
  • biosafety issues, such as recombinant DNA, or
  • potentially infectious and/or hazardous agents

If applicable, you must check the ethics committee websites (Animal Ethics, Biosafety, Ethics Review and Ethical Research) at http://www.research.mq.edu.au/for/researchers/how_to_obtain_ethics_approval and if in doubt, consult your internal supervisor, the University Research Ethics Officer or me.

Unit Overview

No matter whether you trained as an environmental scientist or an environmental manager, in all likelihood you will be managing the environment in some way in your professional career. Society's ability to prevent environmental degradation and remediate environments that are already degraded is crucial to the quality of life our children and we will lead. In many ways you should consider these roles to be as important, or ultimately even more important, than contributions from the 'captains of industry'. This is not an anti-development stance, particularly since some would argue that the statement "no economy without environment" is also quite apt.

Your ability to manage the environment wisely and appropriately will depend upon a sound training in some aspect of science or society - but no one person can be an expert in all fields. You might be best placed to manage people, training schemes, galvanise the community through volunteer programs or fund raising. You might be an environmental atmosphericist, biologist, chemist, geologist or geomorphologist who can monitor and engineer environmental health, or you might use your skills in other ways. However, what is clear, is the need to be able to identify and research specific problems that exist (or may occur in the future), and liaise with others in the course of solving those problems. That's what this unit is mainly about.

Another aspect of this unit is forging links with industry and future colleagues. We hope that in the course of this unit you may make contacts that will lead to your employment. At the very least, you will make links with your peers. Look around you in the classroom. In coming years, your classmates might be prominent scientists in the community, or they might be directors of companies or other organisations. They might be councillors or members of parliament. You might need the contacts they provide, for information exchange, collaboration or employment. Don't waste this opportunity to forge links with your peers!

ENVS363 builds on the principles, too numerous to name here, contained within a whole range of units you will already have taken as part of the 39 cp pre-requisite. I hope that ENVS363 will be a learning experience that will hold you in very good stead during the transition from student to employee.