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GEOP181 – Urban Planet: Cities and Planning in the Anthropocene

2017 – S2 Day

General Information

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Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit Convenor and Lecturer
Dr Donna Houston
Contact via Email
W3A 418
Please email me to make an appointment
Tutor
Dr Rowena Butland
Contact via Via email
Credit points Credit points
3
Prerequisites Prerequisites
ENVG111 or GEOS111 or GEOP111
Corequisites Corequisites
Co-badged status Co-badged status
Unit description Unit description
The unit focuses on two big ideas: urbanisation and the Anthropocene. For the first time in human history, over half of the world’s population live in cities. Urbanisation and the political, cultural and economic structures that sustain urban life are key drivers of global environmental change. The unit asks the question: how are we to imagine, plan and govern cities in the Anthropocene era? What solutions to global environmental change might cities offer? Key dimensions of urban planning theory, philosophy and practice are covered, including: urban cultures, urban infrastructures and mobilities, social change and social justice, urban political economy, governance and urban ecology. Students will have the opportunity to link theory and practice through real-world projects, where Sydney will become ‘living laboratory’ for engaging with our urban planet.

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at http://students.mq.edu.au/student_admin/enrolmentguide/academicdates/

Learning Outcomes

  1. 1. Demonstrate knowledge of the key philosophies of planning and how these influence contemporary urban policies and debates
  2. 2. Use key concepts of urban and planning theories to describe and explain the perceptions of cities in terms of their structure, influences, inhabitants and environments
  3. 3. Articulate the diverse and changing skills required by practising planners in the context of global social and environmental change
  4. 4. Formulate and apply ethical and socially engaged planning principles though an independent investigation of a local urban context
  5. 5. Demonstrate development in communication skills, specifically those of writing and the visual and verbal presentation of work and ideas

General Assessment Information

There are five assessment tasks associated with this unit.  But don't panic!  Some of these tasks are associated with attendance and active participation in class, rather than formal written assignments.  The assessment in GEOP181 focuses on two key areas:

 (1) Developing foundational skills and knowledges for understanding urban dynamics, spaces and places through the exploration and application of urban theory to urban spaces, and

(2) Developing foundational skills in the written, verbal and visual communication of spatial / urban planning concepts and ideas

The assessment tasks for this unit cover a range of activities and are listed below.  Please make sure that you check the GEOP181 iLearn website for additional information about the assessment items, including detailed instructions, marking criteria and marking guides.

A note on participation tasks (assessment items 4 and 5).

While the lectures will be recorded and made available through Echo360 on iLearn, regular attendance at the lectures is strongly encouraged and it is compulsory to attend all of the scheduled tutorials and the student conference in weeks 12 and 13. This means that  in GEOP181 we will be recording both your attendance in the tutorials and your participation in class discussions. 

Role-play and Urban Futures Student Conference

Assessment task 5 is associated with your "participation" marks for the unit and will involve your participation in a Week 10 role play (5%) and your attendance and participation in the student conference in Weeks 12 and 13 (5%). In order to receive these marks you must attend class and you will need to take an active role in the sessions.  If you miss any of these sessions, you will need to have a very good reason and provide Donna with a medical note or documentation that is consistent with Macquarie University's "Disruption to Studies" policy (see policies and procedures below).  The Urban Futures Student Conference is your final piece of assessment for the unit (there is no final exam for this unit) and it is very important to your final result in GEOP181 that you take this exercise very seriously and be generous in your time and attention to other students presenting their work.  

Handing in and receiving back your assignments via Turnitin

Unless otherwise specified, all assignments should be submitted online through Turnitin on the GEOP181 iLearn site.  A Turnitin link will be provided for each assignment task (with the exception of the blog entry associated with the student conference). Please make sure that all assignments are submitted on time - by 5pm on the due date.  Donna will post an announcement on iLearn when the marks are released back via Turnitin, so please make sure that you check iLearn and your Macquarie student email regularly throughout the semester to keep up-to-date with important notices and instructions, feedback and marks for your assignments.

Penalties for late assignments

Late assignments will be penalised with the deduction of 10% of the total mark per day the assignment is late (this includes weekends).  Extensions will only be granted in exceptional circumstances.  Please refer to Macquarie University "Disruption to Studies" policy for guidance and contact Donna as soon as possible if you are experiencing circumstances that are preventing you from completing your assessments on time.

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Hurdle Due
Critical Review 20% 5pm, Fri Sept 1 (Week 5)
Urban Field Project 35% 5pm Fri Oct 20 (Week 10)
Urban Futures Conference 20% Weeks 12 and 13
Planning keyword 15% Weeks 3-11
Active participation 10% Weeks 10, 12 and 13

Critical Review

Due: 5pm, Fri Sept 1 (Week 5)
Weighting: 20%

The lectures and tutorials in weeks 2, 3 and 4 introduce three key urban planning doctrines which have profoundly influenced planning knowledge and practice. Your task is to choose one planning doctrine (planning the ideal city; modern rational planning or participatory/deliberative planning) and write a 1200 word critical review of the key ideas and thinkers that have shaped the planning doctrine.  You will be asked to discuss the strengths and limitations of the doctrine.  Please submit the assignment through the Turnitin link for this task in iLearn.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • 1. Demonstrate knowledge of the key philosophies of planning and how these influence contemporary urban policies and debates
  • 2. Use key concepts of urban and planning theories to describe and explain the perceptions of cities in terms of their structure, influences, inhabitants and environments
  • 3. Articulate the diverse and changing skills required by practising planners in the context of global social and environmental change
  • 5. Demonstrate development in communication skills, specifically those of writing and the visual and verbal presentation of work and ideas

Urban Field Project

Due: 5pm Fri Oct 20 (Week 10)
Weighting: 35%

The urban field project is the major assessment item for this unit. This is where you will be asked to apply planning theory to a real world context. Your task is to select a field study site in Sydney or your local area and to investigate the site from an urban planning/design perspective. This will include observing the site and documenting the space in terms of how it is used; its rules, signs and regulations; its design elements; and its cultural meanings and representations.  Your site analysis will form a case study for a 2000 word essay in which you will apply planning/urban theory to your selected site.

This assessment will be completed in three steps.  Step one will involve the selection of the site and you will be asked to develop your thinking about your assignment in a field project activity to be completed class in week 5.  The activity will help you to clarify your project and to receive feedback about your selection and approach to the project from your tutor.  Step two involves the site analysis itself. This is where you will visit your site and conduct observations and it may involve visiting your site more than once. In some cases you may be able to record your surroundings on your smart phone - though please be careful not to do this in places where you might get into trouble for it!   Step three will involve applying urban theory to your site observations in the form of a 2000 word essay. In your written essay, you will need to include evidence of your reading and research on your chosen topic (in the form of in-text citations and a reference list) and evidence of your field observations (in the form of sketches, photos, and  observations) to receive a pass for the assignment.

Detailed instructions and ideas for this assignment will be made available through iLearn and discussed in the lectures. Please submit your assignment to the Turnitin link on iLearn by the due time and date.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • 1. Demonstrate knowledge of the key philosophies of planning and how these influence contemporary urban policies and debates
  • 2. Use key concepts of urban and planning theories to describe and explain the perceptions of cities in terms of their structure, influences, inhabitants and environments
  • 3. Articulate the diverse and changing skills required by practising planners in the context of global social and environmental change
  • 4. Formulate and apply ethical and socially engaged planning principles though an independent investigation of a local urban context
  • 5. Demonstrate development in communication skills, specifically those of writing and the visual and verbal presentation of work and ideas

Urban Futures Conference

Due: Weeks 12 and 13
Weighting: 20%

Drawing on your research from the field project, you are asked to consider how your investigations relate to the challenges facing sustainable urban futures.  You will develop a short 3-minute presentation (in the form of a poster, short film, powerpoint). Please limit your presentation to a maximum of 2 slides if you are using powerpoint.  The focus of the presentation is on the problems and possibilities of the future city - so please do not be shy in putting your ideas about what our urban futures should look like out there!  You will be assessed on the quality of your visual presentation, your delivery and ability to keep to time, your responses to questions from the conference audience, and the submission of your presentation on a wiki/blog set up for the conference in iLearn.  Your project will not be marked unless you present and submit your blog entry to the conference wiki/blog on iLearn.  

Further details and instructions about this assessment will be posted on iLearn. Your must submit your blog post based on your conference presentation to the iLearn wiki/blog no later than 5pm on Friday 3rd November.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • 1. Demonstrate knowledge of the key philosophies of planning and how these influence contemporary urban policies and debates
  • 2. Use key concepts of urban and planning theories to describe and explain the perceptions of cities in terms of their structure, influences, inhabitants and environments
  • 3. Articulate the diverse and changing skills required by practising planners in the context of global social and environmental change
  • 4. Formulate and apply ethical and socially engaged planning principles though an independent investigation of a local urban context
  • 5. Demonstrate development in communication skills, specifically those of writing and the visual and verbal presentation of work and ideas

Planning keyword

Due: Weeks 3-11
Weighting: 15%

We have kept the readings for the tutorials as short and snappy as possible - a difficult task in a unit about the history and theory of planning!  Therefore we expect that you do the readings each week and come prepared for a discussion in class.  To help facilitate exciting tutorial discussions and collectively build our planning/urbanism vocabularies, you are required to sign up to lead a tutorial discussion in one week (between weeks 3-11).  To lead the discussion you will explore the topic for your selected week by introducing a planning keyword. In class, you will discuss your keyword and how it relates to the readings.  You may bring a stimulus for the class discussion in the form of a media article or a short media clip.  You will then be required to submit your keyword to Turnitin (your definition should be no longer than 400 words, excluding references).  It is expected that more than one student will be presenting each week, if this is the case, please make sure that you have selected a different keyword from your classmates (you will need to check with your tutor).  You are encouraged to go beyond the required readings and explore other resources to help you define your keyword.  


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • 1. Demonstrate knowledge of the key philosophies of planning and how these influence contemporary urban policies and debates
  • 2. Use key concepts of urban and planning theories to describe and explain the perceptions of cities in terms of their structure, influences, inhabitants and environments
  • 3. Articulate the diverse and changing skills required by practising planners in the context of global social and environmental change
  • 5. Demonstrate development in communication skills, specifically those of writing and the visual and verbal presentation of work and ideas

Active participation

Due: Weeks 10, 12 and 13
Weighting: 10%

You will receive a 5% participation mark for your attendance and participation in (1) the week 10 role play (5%) and (2) the Urban Futures Student Conference (in the lecture time slot 10am-12pm) in Weeks 12 and 13 (5%).  Please note that you will need to attend the whole conference to receive your participation mark.  You will be marked on attendance and participation.  The week 10 role play takes place in a week where your major essay is due on the Friday. We have not scheduled  any readings or planning keyword presentations for this week. The role play scenario will be posted on iLearn in week 9.  


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • 1. Demonstrate knowledge of the key philosophies of planning and how these influence contemporary urban policies and debates
  • 2. Use key concepts of urban and planning theories to describe and explain the perceptions of cities in terms of their structure, influences, inhabitants and environments
  • 3. Articulate the diverse and changing skills required by practising planners in the context of global social and environmental change
  • 4. Formulate and apply ethical and socially engaged planning principles though an independent investigation of a local urban context
  • 5. Demonstrate development in communication skills, specifically those of writing and the visual and verbal presentation of work and ideas

Delivery and Resources

Delivery and Resources

GEOP181 Cities and Planning is taught over 13 weeks in a lecture/tutorial format. Each week, a two hour time slot is set aside for lectures and one hour for tutorials.  The lectures will be recorded and made available via Echo360 which is linked to the iLearn page.  We strongly encourage on-campus students to attend the lecture as they are scheduled just before the the tutorials. There will be a number of fantastic guest lectures.

Please note that there is a guided walking tour of Macquarie Park scheduled in the lecture slot (10am-12pm) in week 5.  There are two required readings set for each week and it is essential that you do these readings. Any additional required readings will be extremely short (for example, a piece from the Conversation or a link to related planning documents for you to peruse).  In S2 2017, we are trialling Leganto - a new way of accessing and organising unit readings in iLearn.  A presentation on Leganto is scheduled for week one.  It has some great functions for building your own reading collections for assignments and also has citation tools to assist with generating reference lists. You will note that readings are divided into "required" and "recommended".  Recommended readings are included as a resource for your assignments. You are strongly encouraged to read widely on a range of urban theories and issues beyond the set requirements of the unit.

It is extremely important that you have regular access to a computer and iLearn in GEOP181.  Not only will lecture slides and notes be posted on iLearn, it is also where you will submit your assignments via the Turnitin link and receive feedback.  Donna will post important notices via the announcements tool.  A separate dialogue will be set up for on campus and off-campus students where you can post any questions that you may have. The link to the iLearn login page is: https://ilearn.mq.edu.au/login/

Weekly Required Reading Schedule

Week 1 Life on an Urban Planet

Welcome to the Anthropocene (N.D) Online: http://anthropocene.info/

Explore website and watch 3minute film ‘An Urbanizing Planet’: http://anthropocene.info/short-films.php

Castree, Noel (2016) An Official Welcome to the Anthropcene: But Who Gets to Decide its Here?  The Conservation. Online: https://theconversation.com/an-official-welcome-to-the-anthropocene-epoch-but-who-gets-to-decide-its-here-57113

Week 2 -  Planning Doctrine 1: Ideal Cities and Utopian Planning 

Friedman, J. (2012) The Good City: In Defense of Utopian Thinking. In Susan Farnstein and Scott Campbell (eds) Readings in Planning Theory, pp: 87-104.

Sennett, R. (2013) Reflections on the Public Realm. In Gary Bridge and Sophie Watson (eds) The New Blackwell Companion to the City, pp: 390-397.

Week 3 Planning Doctrine 2: The Rise of Modern Planning

Hall, P (2000) The Centenary of Modern Planning in R Freestone (ed), Urban Planning in a Changing World: The Twentieth Century Experience, pp. 20-39.

Harvey, D. (2008) The Right to the City. New Left Review, pp: 23-40.

Week 4 Planning Doctrine 3: The Participatory Turn in Planning

Arnstein, S. (1969) A Ladder of Citizen Participation, Journal of the American Institute of Planners 35(4) pp: 216-224.

Porter, P. How Can we Meaningfully Recognise Australian Cities as Indigenous Places? The Conversation. Online: https://theconversation.com/how-can-we-meaningfully-recognise-cities-as-indigenous-places-65561

Sandercock, L. (2004) Towards a Planning Imagination for the 21st Century.  Journal of the American Planning Association 70(2): 133-141.

Week 5 - Field Trip to Macquarie Park (tutorials scheduled as normal)

Yigitcanlar, T et al (2016) Place Making for Knowledge Generation and Innovation: Planning and Branding Brisbane's Knowledge Community Precincts, Journal of Urban Technology, 23:1, 115-146.

Monge, F. (2012)  Urban Anthropological Research: Old Spaces and New Ways of Living. Anthropology in the City, edited by Italo Pardo, and Giuliana B. Prato, Taylor and Francis

Week 6 - Sensing the City

Amin, A. (2015) Animated Space. Public Culture 27(2): 239-257.

Urry, J. (2013) City Life and the Senses. The New Blackwell Companion to the City, pp: 347-356.

Week 7 - Urban Mobilities and Transport

Sipe, N. 2014. Transport Planning. In Jason Byrne et al (eds) Australian Environmental Planning: Challenges and Future Prospects. New York and Oxon: Routledge, pp. 146-157

Dowling, R., and Simpson C. (2013) ‘Shift – the way you move’: reconstituting automobility’. Continuum: A Journal of Cultural and Media Studies 27(3): 421-433.

Week 8 Urban Governance

A Plan for a Growing Sydney. Online: http://www.greatersydneycommission.nsw.gov.au/en/What-We-Do/A-Plan-for-Growing-Sydney

Randolph B and Tice, A (2017)  'Relocating Disadvantage in Five Australian Cities: Socio-spatial Polarisation under Neo-liberalism', Urban Policy and Research, 35(2): 103-121 19, http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/08111146.2016.1221337

Power, E (2017) Is this the budget that forgot renters?  The Conversation: http://theconversation.com/is-this-the-budget-that-forgot-renters-77101

Week 9 Urban Dwelling and Inhabitation

Shaw, K.  (2008) Gentrification: What it is, and What Can Be Done about It. Geography Compass 2(5): 1697-1728.

Foster, J. (2014) Hiding in plain view: Vacancy and prospect in Paris’ Petite Ceinture. Cities 40: 124-132.

Week 10 Urban Resilience and Infrastructures

Resilient city: http://www.resilientcity.org/index.cfm?id=11449

Green Infrastructure: Concepts and Definitions. Online: http://gievidencebase.botanicgardens.sa.gov.au/contents/green-infrastructure-concepts-and-definitions

Swyngedouw, E (2006) Circulations and metabolisms: (Hybrid) natures and (Cyborg) cities. Science as Culture 15(2): 105-121.

Week 11 Urban Nature

Owens, M and Wolch, J (2015) Lively cities: people, animals and urban ecoystems. The Oxford Handbook of Animal Studies Edited by Linda Kalof. Oxford University Press.

Houston, D et al (2016) Climate Cosmopolitics and the Possibilities for Urban Planning.  Nature and Culture 11(3): 259-277.

 

Unit Schedule

GEOP181 Cities and Planning Weekly Schedule

(Please note that this schedule may be subject to minor changes. A full weekly schedule, including weekly readings and keywords is available via iLearn)

Weekly Topic Lecture Tutorial  Things to Note
1. Introduction: Life on an Urban Planet

L1 Introduction to the Unit

L2 Planning on a planet of Cities

Introductions and questions, Unit guide; keyword assignments

 

Please attend tutorials this week!

Make sure you check out the link in iLearn to Leganto (this is where you will access unit readings from the Library)

2. Urban Planning Doctrine 1: Ideal Cities and Planning

L3 What Cities ought to Be

L4 Who Are Cities For?  Public Realms and Spaces

Introducing the field project & conference assignments  
3. Urban Planning Doctrine 2: The Rise of Modern Planning

L5 Expert Designs: Spatial Planning and the Urban Growth Machine

L6 The Right to the City

Begin student-led discussions with planning keywords 

Planning keywords should be submitted to the iLearn forum on the day of the tutorial presentation
4. Urban Planning Doctrine 3: The Deliberative Turn

L7  Diverse Cities

L8 The Deliberative Turn

 

 

 
5. Urban Spaces Sydney Field Study: Macquarie Park Walking Tour (meet in lecture theatre, compulsory)

No student lead presentations - but there will be a tutorial!

Field Project briefing - in class exercise

Critical Review essay due to Turnitin in iLearn by 5pm on Friday 1st September.
6.

L9 Sensing the City

L10 TBA

   
7. Urban Mobilities and Transport

L11 Moving through the City

L12 Transport planning

   
  Semester Break   Monday Sept 18-Friday Sept 29
8. Urban Governance

L13 TBA - guest lecture

L14 TBA - guest panel

   
9.  Urban Dwelling & Inhabitation

L15 Urban Regeneration 

L16 Home and home-making

Role play for week 10 posted in iLearn - please read before tutorial  
10.Urban Resilience & Infrastructures

 

L17 Resilient Cities

L18 Cyborg Cities

Week 10 role play in class - no set readings or presentations or keyword entries for this week

Remember that there is a 5% attendance and participation mark for this week's tutorial activity

Your urban field project assignment is due to Turnitin in iLearn by Friday October 2o by 5pm

11. Urban Nature

L19 Wild play

L20 Planning multispecies cities

This is the last student led class with planning keywords  
12. Urban Futures Student Conference (compulsory) No tutorials

Short presentation on a topic related to urban futures. There is a 5% attendance mark for attending all of the presentations in week 12 & 13

 

13.

Urban Futures Student Conference (compulsory)

 

No tutorials Please submit  post to the urban futures conference wiki blog on iLearn by 5pm on November 3.

 

Policies and Procedures

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central. Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Academic Honesty Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/academic_honesty/policy.html

Assessment Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/assessment/policy_2016.html

Grade Appeal Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/gradeappeal/policy.html

Complaint Management Procedure for Students and Members of the Public http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/complaint_management/procedure.html​

Disruption to Studies Policy (in effect until Dec 4th, 2017): http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/disruption_studies/policy.html

Special Consideration Policy (in effect from Dec 4th, 2017): https://staff.mq.edu.au/work/strategy-planning-and-governance/university-policies-and-procedures/policies/special-consideration

In addition, a number of other policies can be found in the Learning and Teaching Category of Policy Central.

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/support/student_conduct/

Results

Results shown in iLearn, or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent. For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au.

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Learning Skills

Learning Skills (mq.edu.au/learningskills) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to improve your marks and take control of your study.

Student Enquiry Service

For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at ask.mq.edu.au

Equity Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

IT Help

For help with University computer systems and technology, visit http://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/information_technology/help/

When using the University's IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use of IT Resources Policy. The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network including students.

Graduate Capabilities

Discipline Specific Knowledge and Skills

Our graduates will take with them the intellectual development, depth and breadth of knowledge, scholarly understanding, and specific subject content in their chosen fields to make them competent and confident in their subject or profession. They will be able to demonstrate, where relevant, professional technical competence and meet professional standards. They will be able to articulate the structure of knowledge of their discipline, be able to adapt discipline-specific knowledge to novel situations, and be able to contribute from their discipline to inter-disciplinary solutions to problems.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • 1. Demonstrate knowledge of the key philosophies of planning and how these influence contemporary urban policies and debates
  • 2. Use key concepts of urban and planning theories to describe and explain the perceptions of cities in terms of their structure, influences, inhabitants and environments
  • 3. Articulate the diverse and changing skills required by practising planners in the context of global social and environmental change
  • 4. Formulate and apply ethical and socially engaged planning principles though an independent investigation of a local urban context
  • 5. Demonstrate development in communication skills, specifically those of writing and the visual and verbal presentation of work and ideas

Assessment tasks

  • Critical Review
  • Urban Field Project
  • Urban Futures Conference
  • Planning keyword
  • Active participation

Critical, Analytical and Integrative Thinking

We want our graduates to be capable of reasoning, questioning and analysing, and to integrate and synthesise learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments; to be able to critique constraints, assumptions and limitations; to be able to think independently and systemically in relation to scholarly activity, in the workplace, and in the world. We want them to have a level of scientific and information technology literacy.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • 1. Demonstrate knowledge of the key philosophies of planning and how these influence contemporary urban policies and debates
  • 2. Use key concepts of urban and planning theories to describe and explain the perceptions of cities in terms of their structure, influences, inhabitants and environments
  • 3. Articulate the diverse and changing skills required by practising planners in the context of global social and environmental change
  • 4. Formulate and apply ethical and socially engaged planning principles though an independent investigation of a local urban context
  • 5. Demonstrate development in communication skills, specifically those of writing and the visual and verbal presentation of work and ideas

Assessment tasks

  • Critical Review
  • Urban Field Project
  • Urban Futures Conference
  • Planning keyword
  • Active participation

Problem Solving and Research Capability

Our graduates should be capable of researching; of analysing, and interpreting and assessing data and information in various forms; of drawing connections across fields of knowledge; and they should be able to relate their knowledge to complex situations at work or in the world, in order to diagnose and solve problems. We want them to have the confidence to take the initiative in doing so, within an awareness of their own limitations.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • 5. Demonstrate development in communication skills, specifically those of writing and the visual and verbal presentation of work and ideas

Assessment task

  • Urban Field Project

Creative and Innovative

Our graduates will also be capable of creative thinking and of creating knowledge. They will be imaginative and open to experience and capable of innovation at work and in the community. We want them to be engaged in applying their critical, creative thinking.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • 4. Formulate and apply ethical and socially engaged planning principles though an independent investigation of a local urban context
  • 5. Demonstrate development in communication skills, specifically those of writing and the visual and verbal presentation of work and ideas

Assessment tasks

  • Urban Field Project
  • Urban Futures Conference
  • Active participation

Effective Communication

We want to develop in our students the ability to communicate and convey their views in forms effective with different audiences. We want our graduates to take with them the capability to read, listen, question, gather and evaluate information resources in a variety of formats, assess, write clearly, speak effectively, and to use visual communication and communication technologies as appropriate.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • 2. Use key concepts of urban and planning theories to describe and explain the perceptions of cities in terms of their structure, influences, inhabitants and environments
  • 3. Articulate the diverse and changing skills required by practising planners in the context of global social and environmental change
  • 5. Demonstrate development in communication skills, specifically those of writing and the visual and verbal presentation of work and ideas

Assessment tasks

  • Critical Review
  • Urban Field Project
  • Urban Futures Conference
  • Planning keyword
  • Active participation

Engaged and Ethical Local and Global citizens

As local citizens our graduates will be aware of indigenous perspectives and of the nation's historical context. They will be engaged with the challenges of contemporary society and with knowledge and ideas. We want our graduates to have respect for diversity, to be open-minded, sensitive to others and inclusive, and to be open to other cultures and perspectives: they should have a level of cultural literacy. Our graduates should be aware of disadvantage and social justice, and be willing to participate to help create a wiser and better society.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • 3. Articulate the diverse and changing skills required by practising planners in the context of global social and environmental change
  • 4. Formulate and apply ethical and socially engaged planning principles though an independent investigation of a local urban context

Assessment tasks

  • Urban Field Project
  • Active participation

Socially and Environmentally Active and Responsible

We want our graduates to be aware of and have respect for self and others; to be able to work with others as a leader and a team player; to have a sense of connectedness with others and country; and to have a sense of mutual obligation. Our graduates should be informed and active participants in moving society towards sustainability.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • 4. Formulate and apply ethical and socially engaged planning principles though an independent investigation of a local urban context

Assessment task

  • Urban Futures Conference

Capable of Professional and Personal Judgement and Initiative

We want our graduates to have emotional intelligence and sound interpersonal skills and to demonstrate discernment and common sense in their professional and personal judgement. They will exercise initiative as needed. They will be capable of risk assessment, and be able to handle ambiguity and complexity, enabling them to be adaptable in diverse and changing environments.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • 2. Use key concepts of urban and planning theories to describe and explain the perceptions of cities in terms of their structure, influences, inhabitants and environments
  • 3. Articulate the diverse and changing skills required by practising planners in the context of global social and environmental change
  • 4. Formulate and apply ethical and socially engaged planning principles though an independent investigation of a local urban context
  • 5. Demonstrate development in communication skills, specifically those of writing and the visual and verbal presentation of work and ideas

Assessment tasks

  • Urban Futures Conference
  • Active participation