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ECED832 – Contemporary Approaches to Infant and Toddler Theory and Practice

2017 – S2 External

General Information

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Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff Associate Professor
Sheila Degotardi
Contact via Via iLearn dialogue
X5B367
by appointment
Credit points Credit points
4
Prerequisites Prerequisites
[(ECED603 or ECED819) and (ECED605 or ECED824)] or [admission to MEChild or MEd or PGDipEdS or MIndigenousEd or MSpecEd or PGCertSpEd]
Corequisites Corequisites
Co-badged status Co-badged status
ECHX832
Unit description Unit description
The recognition of the importance of children's first three years of life has led to an increasing awareness of the specialist nature of infant-toddler education and care services. This unit covers contemporary perspectives that can inform educational programs that aim to support infant-toddler development and learning. Students will build on prior knowledge about children's learning and development to critically reflect on research-based literature and examine its relevance in a range of infant-toddler early childhood programs. Students will design and implement an inquiry-based project to deepen their understanding of the applicability of this knowledge to infants and toddlers, their families and educators.

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at http://students.mq.edu.au/student_admin/enrolmentguide/academicdates/

Learning Outcomes

  1. Demonstrate an advanced and critical understanding of the range of philosophical and theoretical approaches that inform infant-toddler services.
  2. Identify the implications of these approaches for specialised infant-toddler services and practitioners.
  3. Design and implement an inquiry project to enhance their theoretical and practical understanding of a chosen approach.
  4. Demonstrate professional responsibility of their own and others’ learning by providing and responding to supportive, informed and reflective feedback.

General Assessment Information

Full assignment instructions

This Unit Guide provides a brief description only of each required assessment piece. Full instructions are provided via an assessment and assignment guide, available on the iLearn site.

Assignment expectations

In order to achieve a passing grade, it is expected that all assignments are completed, and that all assignments demonstrate a serious attempt to address the assignment task.

Presentation and submission Guidelines

Assignments 1, 3, 4 (presentation slides) and 5 will be submitted via the identified link on the ECED/ECHX832 iLearn site. The submission is via TURNITIN, which permits online assessment as well as the detection of material copied from other sources. Please ensure that all material is written and referenced according to standard academic conventions.

Assignment 2 and the peer feedback part of assignment 4 are submitted as per instructions in the Assignment and assessment guide, available on iLearn

Assignments are due before midnight on the specified date.

IT IS YOUR RESPONSIBILITY TO CHECK THAT YOUR SUBMISSION HAS BEEN SUCCESSFUL AND TAKE ANY MEASURES TO ENSURE THAT YOUR ASSIGNMENT HAS BEEN SUBMITTED TO THE TURNITIN SITE BY THE DUE TIME AND DATE. YOU MUST ALLOW SUFFICIENT TIME FOR YOUR ONLINE SUBMISSION TO BE PROCESSED, AS LATE SUBMISSIONS DUE TO LAST MINUTE TECHNICAL DIFFICULTIES WILL INCUR LATENESS PENALTIES.  

PRESENTATION AND SUBMISSION GUIDELINES

When preparing your assignments, it is essential that:

  • Students regularly save a copy of all assignments before submission,
  • Unless there are exceptional circumstances, no assessment will be accepted after the date that the assessment has been returned to other students.
  • If an assessment is considered to be below passing standard, another staff member on the unit will provide a second opinion. No failed assessment may be re-submitted. 

Assignment presentation and submission

All written submissions are to be legible and professionally presented. Please follow these guidelines when you submit each assignment:

  • All assignments must include the academic honesty declaration as required by all Macquarie University students.
  • Assignments must represent the student’s individual work (see Academic Honesty section below).
  • Please type all assignments using 12 point font and 1.5 or double-space the lines. Save your file in .doc, .docx or pdf format.
  • Allow a left and right-hand margin of at least 3cm in all assignments. This allows us to attach, and you to read your feedback comments easily.
  • All assessments must be submitted through Turnitin in .doc or .pdf format for submission.
  • It is the responsibility of the student to ensure that all assessments are successfully submitted through Turnitin.
  • Faculty assignment cover sheets are NOT required.
  • Use APA 6th referencing style to acknowledge your sources and support your ideas with in-text referencing, and include a full reference list of all works that are cited within your assignment.

Draft Submissions & Turnitin Originality Reports

  • Students may use Turnitin’s Originality Report as a learning tool to improve their academic writing if this option is made available in the Unit.

Final Submissions

  • Students are responsible for checking that their submission has been successful and has been submitted by the due date and time.
  • Do not contact staff asking them to check your submission.
  • Late submissions due to last minute technical difficulties may incur a lateness penalty.
  • Your assignment will be marked based on what is received – any omissions will not be accepted after your submission. Please check very carefully.

Word limit

All sections of the assignment, apart from references and appendices, are included in the word limit.  If your assignment seriously exceeds the word limit, it will be marked only to the point at which the word limit is reached. 

Academic honesty and plagiarism

The nature of scholarly endeavour, dependent as it is on the work of others, binds all members of the University community to abide by the principles of academic honesty.

Plagiarism is a matter of particular importance. Plagiarism is defined as using the work or ideas of another person and presenting this as your own without clear acknowledgement of the source of the work or ideas. This includes, but is not limited to, any of the following acts:

  • copying out part(s) of any document or audio-visual material or computer code or website content without indicating their origins;
  • using or extracting another person's concepts, experimental results, or conclusions;
  • summarising another person's work;
  • submitting substantially the same final version of any material as another student in an assignment where there was collaborative preparatory work;
  • use of others (paid or otherwise) to conceive, research or write material submitted for assessment; and
  • submitting the same or substantially the same piece of work for two different tasks (self-plagiarism).

The University’s Academic Honesty Policy can be found on the Policy Central website: http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/index.html

TURNITIN is used to assist students with appropriate referencing and paraphrasing, and to detect plagiarism. The system also serves as a digital repository if anything should happen to your hard copy submission or personal backup. Please ensure you have stated your TURNITIN receipt number on your coversheet. A link to TURNITIN is embedded in iLearn. 

Extensions and Late Assignments

Applications for extensions must be made via AskMQ at https://ask.mq.edu.au as a "Disruption to Studies" request before the submission date. Students who experience a disruption to their studies through ill-health or misadventure are able to apply for this request. Extensions can only be granted if they meet the Disruption to Studies policy and are submitted via ask.mq.edu.au. This will ensure consistency in the consideration of such requests is maintained.

In general, there should be no need for extensions except through illness or misadventure that would be categorised as unavoidable disruption according to the University definition of same, and currently available at:

https://students.mq.edu.au/study/my-study-program/special-consideration/disruption-to-studies

Late submissions without extension will receive a penalty of 5% reduction of the total possible mark for each day late (including weekends and public holidays). You are reminded that submitting even just 1 day late could be the difference between passing and failing a unit. Late penalties are applied by unit convenors or their delegates after tasks are assessed.

No assessable work will be accepted after the return/release of marked work on the same topic. If a student is still permitted to submit on the basis of unavoidable disruption, an alternative topic may be set. 

Students should keep an electronic file of all assessments. Claims regarding "lost" assessments cannot be made if the file cannot be produced. It is also advisable to keep an electronic file of all drafts and the final submission on a USB untouched/unopened after submission. This can be used to demonstrate easily that the assessment has not been amended after the submission date.

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Hurdle Due
Reading journal 20% 20th August and 10th September
Project ideas consultation 0% 1st group consultation session
Research Project Proposal 30% 24th September
Project progress report 15% 2nd group consultation session
Project final report 35% 19th November

Reading journal

Due: 20th August and 10th September
Weighting: 20%

2 x 600-700 word critical analyses of required readings


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Demonstrate an advanced and critical understanding of the range of philosophical and theoretical approaches that inform infant-toddler services.
  • Identify the implications of these approaches for specialised infant-toddler services and practitioners.
  • Demonstrate professional responsibility of their own and others’ learning by providing and responding to supportive, informed and reflective feedback.

Project ideas consultation

Due: 1st group consultation session
Weighting: 0%
This is a hurdle assessment task (see assessment policy for more information on hurdle assessment tasks)

Project ideas consultation hurdle task


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Design and implement an inquiry project to enhance their theoretical and practical understanding of a chosen approach.
  • Demonstrate professional responsibility of their own and others’ learning by providing and responding to supportive, informed and reflective feedback.

Research Project Proposal

Due: 24th September
Weighting: 30%

1500 word written project proposal


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Demonstrate an advanced and critical understanding of the range of philosophical and theoretical approaches that inform infant-toddler services.
  • Design and implement an inquiry project to enhance their theoretical and practical understanding of a chosen approach.
  • Demonstrate professional responsibility of their own and others’ learning by providing and responding to supportive, informed and reflective feedback.

Project progress report

Due: 2nd group consultation session
Weighting: 15%

10-15 minute powerpoint presentation detailing project progress, emerging findings and implications, plus written feedback to peer


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Demonstrate an advanced and critical understanding of the range of philosophical and theoretical approaches that inform infant-toddler services.
  • Identify the implications of these approaches for specialised infant-toddler services and practitioners.
  • Design and implement an inquiry project to enhance their theoretical and practical understanding of a chosen approach.
  • Demonstrate professional responsibility of their own and others’ learning by providing and responding to supportive, informed and reflective feedback.

Project final report

Due: 19th November
Weighting: 35%

1750-2250 word report: Analysis and critical discussion of project findings


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Demonstrate an advanced and critical understanding of the range of philosophical and theoretical approaches that inform infant-toddler services.
  • Identify the implications of these approaches for specialised infant-toddler services and practitioners.
  • Design and implement an inquiry project to enhance their theoretical and practical understanding of a chosen approach.
  • Demonstrate professional responsibility of their own and others’ learning by providing and responding to supportive, informed and reflective feedback.

Delivery and Resources

ECED/ECHX832 is delivered in External Mode. 

The unit content, delivered via unit readings and assignment tasks, is supported by:

Two compulsory consultation sessions of around 90-minutes in length.

The precise date and times of these sessions will be determined early in the study session, and will depend upon the availability and time-zones of students and the unit convener.  Unless alternative arrangements are agreed upon by all students in each study group: 

  • Session 1 will occur on the 17th of September
  • Session 2 will take place on the 11th November.

Students may elect to come on campus, or attend remotely, via the Zoom online conferencing facility. Students who choose the online option must ensure that they have reliable and sufficient internet connection. Details will be provided about the technical requirements on the ECED/ECHX832 ilearn site. Please contact the convener before census date if you foresee any difficulties with attending either of these consultation sessions.

Individual consultations with the unit convener

The unit convener is available for individual consultations via email, phone or Skype. Please contact her via the ilearn dialogue for an appointment to chat.

Allocation of student time to this unit

ECED/ECHX832 is worth four credit points and you would usually be expected to allocate about 12 hours a week in study for a four credit point unit over the session. The guide outlined below provides an indication of the time spent on learning experiences.This estimate is based on average student performance. You may choose to spend more time on the unit, particularly if you are attempting to achieve high grades or if you encounter problems in understanding the material or meeting unit requirements.

Learning Experience

Approximate time per relevant week

Estimated time over the semester

Orientation to the unit

2 x 1 hours

2 hours

Weekly prescribed readings

7 x 3.5 hours

24.5 hours

Consultation session engagement

2 x 90 minute consultation sessions 

3 hours

Assignment 1

2 x 6 hours

12 hours

Assignment 2

4 hours

4 hours

Assignment 3

14 hours

14 hours

Assignment 4

1 hour for feedback

3 hours presentation preparation

4 hours

Assignment 5

Data collection and analysis – 4 x 6 hours

Final report

48 hours

24 hours

Unit web-page

There is a website for this unit. Access to this unit is available online through iLearn (ilearn.mq.edu.au).  You will need to login using your Macquarie ID. This site is an essential unit resource. You are required to check this website at least twice per week for any announcements. In addition, it has the following features and functions:

Study and assignment resources

Assignment submission links: For you to submit your assignment work

Dialogue: for private messages to teaching staff.

Please note that I will respond to dialogue emails in a timely manner. Please be aware that I have multiple teaching, research and administrative commitments so it may take me a couple of days to respond. It is unrealistic to expect me to respond after work hours or during weekend. 

Study Resources

There is no required text for this unit. Instead, you will be provided with some research-based literature for weeks 1 to 7, and are then expected to source your own literature to assist with the completion of your assignments.

The required readings are listed in the Weekly content section of this Unit Guide. Information about how to find these readings will be provided in the study resources section of the iLearn site. 

Recommended text (available from the co-op bookshop):

Degotardi, S., & Pearson, E (2014). The relationship worlds of infants and toddlers: Multiple perspectives from early years research and practice. Maidenhead, UK: Open University Press.

There are also many pedagogical or development books about infant and toddlers in the library. The following list contains some research-based literature that pertains specifically to infant-toddler curriculum, pedagogy and development.

Research-based books

Abbott, L., & Langston, A. (2002) Birth to three matters: A framework to support children in their earliest years. London, DfES/Surestart.

Berthelsen, D., Brownlee, J. & Johansson, E. (Eds.) (2009). Participatory learning in the early years: Research and pedagogy, Oxon, UK, Routledge.

Elfer, P., Goldschmied, E., & Selleck, D. (2003). Key persons in the nursery: Building relationships for quality provision. London: David Fulton Publishers.

Gandini, L. & Edwards, C. P. (2001) Bambini: The Italian approach to infant/toddler care, New York, Teachers College Press.

Goouch, K., & Powell, S. (2013). The baby room: Principles, policy and practice. Maidenhead, UK: Open University Press

Gopnik, A. (2009) The philosophical baby, New York, NY, Farra, Straus and Giroux.

Johansson, E., & White, E.J (2011). Educational research with our youngest: Voices of infants and toddlers. Dordrecht: Springer

Lamb, M. E., Bornstein, M. & Teti, D. M. (2002) Development in infancy, Mahwah, N.J, Erlbaum.

Nelson, K. (2007) Young minds in social worlds: Experience, meaning, and memory Cambridge, MA, Harvard University Press.

Rochat, P. (2001) The infant's world, Cambridge, MA, Harvard University Press.

Harrison, L., & Sumsion, J. (2014). Lived spaces of infant-toddler education and care: Exploring diverse perspectives on theory, research and practice. Dordrecht, The Nederlands: Springer.

Wittmer, D. (2008) Focusing on peers: The importance of relationships in the early years, Washington, DC, Zero to Three.

Some suggested book chapters (although see above for edited books in infant-toddler ECEC):

Brooker, L. (2009) Just like having a best friend: How babies and toddlers construct relationships with their key workers in nurseries. In Papatheodorou, T. & Moyles, J. (Eds.) Learning together in the early years: Exploring relational pedagogy. Oxon, UK, Routledge.

Degotardi, S. (2015) Expressing, interpreting and exchanging perspectives during infant-toddler social interactions: The significance of acting with others in mind. In L. Harrison and J Sumsion (Eds). Lived spaces of infant-toddler education and care: exploring diverse perspectives on theory, research and practice, pp187-199.. Dordrecht, The Nederlands: Springer.

Degotardi, S., Semann, A. & Shepherd, W. (2012 ) Using practitioner inquiry to promote reflexivity and change in early childhood programs. In Whiteman, P. & De Gioia, K. (Eds.) Children and Childhoods. Newcastle, England, Cambridge Scholars Publishing.

Hay, D. F., Caplan, M. & Nash, A. (2009). The beginnings of peer relations. In Rubin, K. H., Bukowski, W. M. & Laurson, B. (Eds.) Handbook of peer interactions, relationships, and groups. New York, The Guilford Press.

Mitchelmore, S., Degotardi, S., & Fleet, A. (2017). The richness of everyday moments: Bringing visibility to the qualities of care within pedagogical spaces (87-99). In White, E.J and Dalli, C. (Eds.). Under-three Year Olds in Policy and Practice. Singapore: Springer

Singer, E. & De Haan, D. (2007) Social life of young children: Co-contruction of shared meanings and togetherness, humour, and conflicts in child care centres. In Spodek, B. & Saracho, O. N. (Eds.) Contemporary perspectives on research in early childhood social learning. Charlotte, N.C., Information Age Publishers.

Journal Special Issues

Early Years: An International Research Journal, 32 (2): Special issue: Professional issues in work with babies and toddlers

European Early Childhood Education Research Journal, 19 (2): Special Issue – Birth to three

International Journal of Early Childhood, 10 (1): Special issue on children under 3

 

Unit Schedule

WEEKLY CONTENT

Week beginning

Topic

Prescribed readings

1. 31st July

Conceptualisations of ‘quality’ in infant-toddler early childhood programs

Read at least 3 from:

Brownlee, J., Berthelsen, D., & Segaran, N. (2009). Childcare workers' and centre directors' beliefs about infant childcare quality and professional training. Early Child Development and Care, 179(4), 453-475.

Dalli, C (2014): Quality for babies and toddlers in early years settings. TACTYC Occassional Paper 4: http://tactyc.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/Occ-Paper-4-Prof-Carmen-Dalli.pdf

Degotardi, S. & Pearson, (2014). The relationship worlds of infants and toddlers: Multiple perspectives from early years theory and practice (Chapter 1) . Maidenhead, Open University Press.

King, E. K., Pierro, R. C., Li, J., Porterfield, M. L., & Rucker, L. (2016). Classroom quality in infant and toddler classrooms: impact of age and programme type. Early Child Development and Care, 25, 875-893. doi:10.1080/03004430.2015.1134521

Pessanha, M., Peixoto, C., Barros, S., Cadima, J., Pinto, A. I., Coelho, V., & Bryant, D. M. (2017). Stability and change in teacher-infant interaction quality over time. Early Childhood Research Quarterly, 40, 87-97. doi:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ecresq.2016.10.003

Thomason, S. A., & La Paro, K. (2009). Measuring the quality of teacher-child interactions in toddler child care. Early Education and Development, 20, 285-304. doi: 10.1080=10409280902773351

Li, W., Farkas, G., Duncan, G., Burchinal, M. R., & Vandell, D. (2013). Timing of high quality child care and contiive, language, and preacademic development. Developmental Psychology, 49(8), 1440-1451. doi:10.1037/a0030613

2.

7th August

Challenges and debates

Read at least 3 from:

Degotardi, S. & Pearson, (2014). The relationship worlds of infants and toddlers: Multiple perspectives from early years theory and practice (Chapter 2). Maidenhead, Open University Press.

Cheeseman, S. (2017). Narratives of infants’ encounters with curriculum: Beyond the curriculum of care. Contemporary Issues in Early Childhood, 18(1), 55-66. doi:10.1177/1463949117692243

Cheeseman, S., Sumsion, J., & Press, F. (2015). Infants of the productivity agenda: Learning from birth or waiting to learn. Australasian Journal of Early Childhood, 40(3) 38-45.

Davis, B., & Degotardi, S. (2015). Who cares: Infant educators' responses to professional discourses of care. Early Child Development and Care. doi:10.1080/03004430.2015.1028385

Elfer, P., & Page, J. (2015). Pedagogy with babies: perspectives of eight nursery managers. Early Child Development and Care, 1-21. doi:10.1080/03004430.2015.1028399

Clark, R. M. & Baylis, S. (2012) 'Wasted down there': Policy and practice with the under-threes. Early Years: Journal of International Research and Development, 32, 229-242.

3.

14th August

Conceptualising curriculum 1: Play and exploration

Read at least 3 from:

Degotardi, S., & Pearson, E. (2016). Infant Play: How Interactions Build and Support Relationships. In M. Ebbeck and M. Waniganayeke (Eds.), Children’s play in early childhood education: Facilitating learning in diverse contexts, 2n Edition. Oxford University Press.  

Degotardi, S. (2013). "I think, I can": Acknowledging and promoting agency during educator-infant play. In O. F. Lillemyr, S. Dockett, & B. Perry (Eds.), Varied perspectives on play and learning: Theory and research on early years education. Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing.

Loizou, E. (2007) Humour: A different type of play. European Early Childhood Education Research Journal, 13 (2), 97-109. doi.org/10.1080/13502930585209701

Ridgway, A., Li, L., & Quiñones, G. (2016). Visual narrative methodology in educational research with babies: triadic play in babies’ room. Video Journal of Education and Pedagogy, 1(1), 1. doi:10.1186/s40990-016-0005-0

Salamon, A., & Harrison, L. (2015). Early childhood educators' conceptions of infants' capabilities: the nexus between beliefs and practice. Early Years: An International Research Journal, 35(3), 273-288. doi:10.1080/09575146.2015.1042961

Shin, M. (2012) The role of joint attention in social communication and play among infants. Journal of Early Childhood Research, 10, 309-317.

Reading Journal entry 1 due 20th August

4. 21st August

Conceptualising curriculum 2: Routines, rituals and interactions

Read at least 3 from:

Albon, G., & Barnes, J. (2009). Investigating sleep routines in early childhood care and education centres. The First Years Tga Tua Tuatahi: New Zealand Journal of Infant and Toddler Education, 11(1), 16-18

Degotardi, S., Torr, J., & Nguyen, N.T (2016). Infant-toddler educator’ language support practices during snack-time. Australasian Journal of Early Childhood, 41(4), 52-62

Degotardi, S. (2010). High-quality interactions with infants: Relationships with early childhood practitioners’ interpretations and qualification levels in play and routine contexts. International Journal of Early Years Education, 18(1), 27-41.

Girolametto, L., Weitzman, E., van Lieshout, R., & Dawna, D. (2000). Directiveness in teachers' language input to toddlers and preschoolers in day care. Journal of Speech, Language and Hearing Research, 43, 1101-1114.

Hallam, R. A., Fouts, H. N., Bargreen, K. N., & Perkins, K. (2016). Teacher-child interactions during mealtimes: Observations of toddlers in high subsidy child care centres. Early Childhood Educaiton Journal, 44, 51-59. doi:10.1007/s10643-014-0678-x

 

5. 

28th August

Relationship-based pedagogy 1

 

 

 

 

Read at least 6 from:

Degotardi, S. & Pearson, (2014). The relationship worlds of infants and toddlers: Multiple perspectives from early years theory and practice (Chapter 3, 4, 5 or 6 – up to p.81) . Maidenhead, Open University Press.

Degotardi, S., & Pearson, E. (2008). Relationship theory in the nursery: Attachment and beyond. Contemporary Issues in Early Childhood, 10(2), 144-145.

Degotardi, S. (2015). Mind mindedness: Forms, features and implications for infant-toddler pedagogy. In S. Robson & S. F. Quinn (Eds.), Routledge International Handbook of Young Children's Thinking. London: Routledge.

Elfer, P. (2006) Exploring children's expressions of attachment in nursery. European Early Childhood Education Research Journal, 14, 81-95.

Lee, S. Y. (2006). A journey to a close, secure, and synchronous relationship. Infant-caregiver relationship development in a childcare context. Journal of Early Childhood Research, 4(2), 133-151.

Lokken, G. (2000). Tracing the social style of toddler peers. Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, 44(2), 163-176.

McGaha, C. G., Cummings, R., Lippard, B. & Dallas, K. (2012) Relationship building: infants, toddlers, and 2-year-olds. Early Childhood Research & Practice, 13(1).

Shin, M. (2010). Peeking at the relationship world of infant friends and caregivers. Journal of early childhood research, 8(3), 294-302. doi: 10.1177/1476718X10366777

Williams, S. T., Mastergeorge, A. M. & Ontai, L. L. (2010) Caregiver involvement in infant peer interactions: Scaffolding in a social context. Early Childhood Research Quarterly, 25, 251-266.

6.

4th Sept

Relationship-based pedagogy 2 

Reading Journal entry 2 due 10th September

11th Sept

Professionalism and professionalisation

Read at least 3 from:

Degotardi, S., & Pearson, E (2014), The relationship worlds of infants and toddlers: Multiple perspectives from early years theory and practice (Chapter 6, pp.81-end or Chapter 7) . Maidenhead, Open University Press.

Elfer, P. (2012). Emotion in nursery work: Work discussion as a model of critical professional reflection. Early Years: An International Journal of Research and Development, 32(2), 129-141. doi: 10.1080/09575146.2012.697877

Insley, K., & Lucas, S. (2009). Making the most of the relationship between two adults to impact on early childhood pedagogy: Raising standards and narrowing attainment. In T. Papatheodorou & J. Moyles (Eds.), Learning together in the early years: Exploring relational pedagogy (pp. 157-168). London, UK: Routledge.

Recchia, S. L., & Loizou, E. (2002). Becoming an infant caregiver: Three profiles of personal and professional growth. Journal of Research in Childhood Education, 16(2), 133-147.

Tomlin, A. M., Sturm, L., & Koch, S. M. (2009). Observe, listen, wonder, and respond: A preliminary exploration of reflective function skills in early care providers. Infant mental Health Journal, 30(6), 634-647.

Virmani, E. A., & Ontai, L. L. (2010). Supervision and training in child care: Does reflective supervision foster caregiver insightfulness? Infant Mental Health Journal, 31(1), 16-32. doi: 10.1002/imhj.20240

Consultation session 1 on the 17th September: Assignment 2 Due on that day

18th  Sept – 1st Oct

Mid session recess 

Assignment 3 due 24th September

8.     2nd  October

 

 

Project implementation

9.     9th October

10.  16th October

11. 23rd October

12. 30th October

13. 7th November

Prepare for second consultation session

Second consultation session on the weekend of the 11th November: Assignment 4 presentation due at ths time, with peer feedback due 1 day post the consultation session

14. 14th November

Project completion

Assignment 5 due Sunday 19th November

           

 

Learning and Teaching Activities

On-going convener and peer support

This unit has been developed on the understanding that students will recieve regular support from the unit convener and their peers. The following structured and incidental learning and teaching activities are used: 1. Compulsory small group consultation sessions (students can choose face-to-face or online participation) 2. Individual consultations, as arranged with the unit convener 3. Student arranged peer support 4. Online seminars and meetings, arranged as required 5. Written guidance provided on the iLearn site 6. Short podcasts, arranged and supplied as required, if requested by students Students are invited to make full use of all of these teaching and learning activities so that they can gain the most learning benefit from this unit.

Policies and Procedures

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central. Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Academic Honesty Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/academic_honesty/policy.html

Assessment Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/assessment/policy_2016.html

Grade Appeal Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/gradeappeal/policy.html

Complaint Management Procedure for Students and Members of the Public http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/complaint_management/procedure.html​

Disruption to Studies Policy (in effect until Dec 4th, 2017): http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/disruption_studies/policy.html

Special Consideration Policy (in effect from Dec 4th, 2017): https://staff.mq.edu.au/work/strategy-planning-and-governance/university-policies-and-procedures/policies/special-consideration

In addition, a number of other policies can be found in the Learning and Teaching Category of Policy Central.

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/support/student_conduct/

Results

Results shown in iLearn, or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent. For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au.

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Learning Skills

Learning Skills (mq.edu.au/learningskills) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to improve your marks and take control of your study.

Student Enquiry Service

For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at ask.mq.edu.au

Equity Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

IT Help

For help with University computer systems and technology, visit http://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/information_technology/help/

When using the University's IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use of IT Resources Policy. The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network including students.

Graduate Capabilities

PG - Discipline Knowledge and Skills

Our postgraduates will be able to demonstrate a significantly enhanced depth and breadth of knowledge, scholarly understanding, and specific subject content knowledge in their chosen fields.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Demonstrate an advanced and critical understanding of the range of philosophical and theoretical approaches that inform infant-toddler services.
  • Identify the implications of these approaches for specialised infant-toddler services and practitioners.
  • Design and implement an inquiry project to enhance their theoretical and practical understanding of a chosen approach.

Assessment tasks

  • Reading journal
  • Project ideas consultation
  • Research Project Proposal
  • Project progress report
  • Project final report

PG - Research and Problem Solving Capability

Our postgraduates will be capable of systematic enquiry; able to use research skills to create new knowledge that can be applied to real world issues, or contribute to a field of study or practice to enhance society. They will be capable of creative questioning, problem finding and problem solving.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Demonstrate an advanced and critical understanding of the range of philosophical and theoretical approaches that inform infant-toddler services.
  • Identify the implications of these approaches for specialised infant-toddler services and practitioners.
  • Design and implement an inquiry project to enhance their theoretical and practical understanding of a chosen approach.

Assessment tasks

  • Project ideas consultation
  • Research Project Proposal
  • Project progress report
  • Project final report

PG - Critical, Analytical and Integrative Thinking

Our postgraduates will be capable of utilising and reflecting on prior knowledge and experience, of applying higher level critical thinking skills, and of integrating and synthesising learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments. A characteristic of this form of thinking is the generation of new, professionally oriented knowledge through personal or group-based critique of practice and theory.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Demonstrate an advanced and critical understanding of the range of philosophical and theoretical approaches that inform infant-toddler services.
  • Identify the implications of these approaches for specialised infant-toddler services and practitioners.
  • Design and implement an inquiry project to enhance their theoretical and practical understanding of a chosen approach.

Assessment tasks

  • Reading journal
  • Project ideas consultation
  • Project progress report
  • Project final report

PG - Effective Communication

Our postgraduates will be able to communicate effectively and convey their views to different social, cultural, and professional audiences. They will be able to use a variety of technologically supported media to communicate with empathy using a range of written, spoken or visual formats.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Demonstrate an advanced and critical understanding of the range of philosophical and theoretical approaches that inform infant-toddler services.
  • Identify the implications of these approaches for specialised infant-toddler services and practitioners.
  • Design and implement an inquiry project to enhance their theoretical and practical understanding of a chosen approach.
  • Demonstrate professional responsibility of their own and others’ learning by providing and responding to supportive, informed and reflective feedback.

Assessment tasks

  • Reading journal
  • Project ideas consultation
  • Research Project Proposal
  • Project progress report
  • Project final report

PG - Engaged and Responsible, Active and Ethical Citizens

Our postgraduates will be ethically aware and capable of confident transformative action in relation to their professional responsibilities and the wider community. They will have a sense of connectedness with others and country and have a sense of mutual obligation. They will be able to appreciate the impact of their professional roles for social justice and inclusion related to national and global issues

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Demonstrate an advanced and critical understanding of the range of philosophical and theoretical approaches that inform infant-toddler services.
  • Identify the implications of these approaches for specialised infant-toddler services and practitioners.
  • Design and implement an inquiry project to enhance their theoretical and practical understanding of a chosen approach.
  • Demonstrate professional responsibility of their own and others’ learning by providing and responding to supportive, informed and reflective feedback.

Assessment tasks

  • Project ideas consultation
  • Project progress report
  • Project final report

PG - Capable of Professional and Personal Judgment and Initiative

Our postgraduates will demonstrate a high standard of discernment and common sense in their professional and personal judgment. They will have the ability to make informed choices and decisions that reflect both the nature of their professional work and their personal perspectives.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Demonstrate an advanced and critical understanding of the range of philosophical and theoretical approaches that inform infant-toddler services.
  • Identify the implications of these approaches for specialised infant-toddler services and practitioners.
  • Design and implement an inquiry project to enhance their theoretical and practical understanding of a chosen approach.
  • Demonstrate professional responsibility of their own and others’ learning by providing and responding to supportive, informed and reflective feedback.

Assessment tasks

  • Reading journal
  • Project ideas consultation
  • Research Project Proposal
  • Project progress report
  • Project final report