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ANTH701 – Core Issues in Anthropological Theory I

2017 – S1 Day

General Information

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Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit Convenor
Chris Houston
Contact via chris.houston@mq.edu.au
W6A 605
Tuesdays 3.00pm - 5.00pm
Payel Ray
Credit points Credit points
4
Prerequisites Prerequisites
Admission to MRes
Corequisites Corequisites
Co-badged status Co-badged status
Unit description Unit description
The core unit in the Master of Research specialisation in anthropology provides a grounding in theoretical, methodological and interpretive issues that are currently being debated by anthropologists. These issues will vary from year to year according to contemporary developments in anthropology and the interests of the course convenor. Others may be more enduring, such as the theoretical issues related to kinship, to politics and power, the "writing culture" debate, "Orientalism" the problem of the "other," cultural relativism, and and the relationship between individual and society. This year the ANTH 701 seminar will focus on the last of these ‘enduring’ issues. The works of Bourdieu, Jackson, Castoriadis and Rapport focus on different aspects of this relationship: on social reproduction and domination; on the creation of subjectivity through intercultural encounter; on the self-institution of society; and on the individual as creator of their world beyond their conditioning by pre-existing cultural frameworks.

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at http://students.mq.edu.au/student_admin/enrolmentguide/academicdates/

Learning Outcomes

  1. Students who have successfully done this unit will be able to demonstrate a significantly enhanced depth and breadth of knowledge, scholarly understanding, and specific subject content knowledge in the field of social theory.
  2. Students will be able to utilize and reflect on prior knowledge and experience, of applying higher level critical thinking skills, and of integrating and synthesising learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments.
  3. Students will be able to synthesize and analyze information from a variety of sources.
  4. Students will be able to articulate clearly a coherent argument in written and oral form to a variety of audiences. Students will develop a high level of oral and written skills, with specialisation for the specific needs of a discipline.
  5. Students will be ethically aware and capable of confident transformative action in relation to their and the wider community. They will have a sense of connectedness with others and have a sense of mutual obligation. They will be able to appreciate the impact of their ethnographic writing for social justice and inclusion related to national and global issues.

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Due
Major Essay 70% Friday, July 26th.
Seminar Participation 10% July 26
Minor Essay 10% 29 April
Literature review 10% 17May

Major Essay

Due: Friday, July 26th.
Weighting: 70%

This essay counts for 100% of your grade and is required to be approximately 5,000 words in length. The essay should relate, compare and critically assess the work of two or more of the authors to the major themes of the unit – cultural creativity, agency (agents), and world-making. In your essay, critically focus on where the authors identify sources of creativity or change, and how the texts articulate society and the individual – or in what terms. This essay is due on Friday, July 26th. Two typed copies must be submitted on this date. 


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Students who have successfully done this unit will be able to demonstrate a significantly enhanced depth and breadth of knowledge, scholarly understanding, and specific subject content knowledge in the field of social theory.
  • Students will be able to utilize and reflect on prior knowledge and experience, of applying higher level critical thinking skills, and of integrating and synthesising learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments.
  • Students will be able to synthesize and analyze information from a variety of sources.
  • Students will be able to articulate clearly a coherent argument in written and oral form to a variety of audiences. Students will develop a high level of oral and written skills, with specialisation for the specific needs of a discipline.
  • Students will be ethically aware and capable of confident transformative action in relation to their and the wider community. They will have a sense of connectedness with others and have a sense of mutual obligation. They will be able to appreciate the impact of their ethnographic writing for social justice and inclusion related to national and global issues.

Seminar Participation

Due: July 26
Weighting: 10%

Over the duration of the seminar, each student will give one or two brief introductions to the week’s reading(s), drawing out its main themes and selecting a number of questions or puzzles for the seminar to discuss. These introductory remarks are intended merely to get the seminar rolling – students might wish to focus on something interesting, maddening or confusing about the reading for example.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Students who have successfully done this unit will be able to demonstrate a significantly enhanced depth and breadth of knowledge, scholarly understanding, and specific subject content knowledge in the field of social theory.
  • Students will be able to utilize and reflect on prior knowledge and experience, of applying higher level critical thinking skills, and of integrating and synthesising learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments.
  • Students will be able to synthesize and analyze information from a variety of sources.
  • Students will be able to articulate clearly a coherent argument in written and oral form to a variety of audiences. Students will develop a high level of oral and written skills, with specialisation for the specific needs of a discipline.
  • Students will be ethically aware and capable of confident transformative action in relation to their and the wider community. They will have a sense of connectedness with others and have a sense of mutual obligation. They will be able to appreciate the impact of their ethnographic writing for social justice and inclusion related to national and global issues.

Minor Essay

Due: 29 April
Weighting: 10%

Students will write a draft of their major essay


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Students who have successfully done this unit will be able to demonstrate a significantly enhanced depth and breadth of knowledge, scholarly understanding, and specific subject content knowledge in the field of social theory.
  • Students will be able to utilize and reflect on prior knowledge and experience, of applying higher level critical thinking skills, and of integrating and synthesising learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments.
  • Students will be able to synthesize and analyze information from a variety of sources.
  • Students will be able to articulate clearly a coherent argument in written and oral form to a variety of audiences. Students will develop a high level of oral and written skills, with specialisation for the specific needs of a discipline.
  • Students will be ethically aware and capable of confident transformative action in relation to their and the wider community. They will have a sense of connectedness with others and have a sense of mutual obligation. They will be able to appreciate the impact of their ethnographic writing for social justice and inclusion related to national and global issues.

Literature review

Due: 17May
Weighting: 10%

Students will write a small review of their thesis literature


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Students who have successfully done this unit will be able to demonstrate a significantly enhanced depth and breadth of knowledge, scholarly understanding, and specific subject content knowledge in the field of social theory.
  • Students will be able to utilize and reflect on prior knowledge and experience, of applying higher level critical thinking skills, and of integrating and synthesising learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments.
  • Students will be able to synthesize and analyze information from a variety of sources.
  • Students will be able to articulate clearly a coherent argument in written and oral form to a variety of audiences. Students will develop a high level of oral and written skills, with specialisation for the specific needs of a discipline.
  • Students will be ethically aware and capable of confident transformative action in relation to their and the wider community. They will have a sense of connectedness with others and have a sense of mutual obligation. They will be able to appreciate the impact of their ethnographic writing for social justice and inclusion related to national and global issues.

Delivery and Resources

Lecture/meeting: Wednesday Afternoons, in Building W6A, Room 708

There will be a required list of reading and recommended resources that will be made

available in iLearn

 

The ANTH 701 Convenor in 2013 is Christopher Houston, Room 605. I am available on extension 8471 and the email address is chris.houston@mq.edu.au. Please contact me about problems of any nature that affects your studies this year. 

Unit Schedule

ANTH 701 class seminars will run from the second week of the first semester until mid-June. The seminar will be devoted to a discussion of course readings, but we will consider essay and thesis research strategies as well. Students are expected to follow the set readings and to participate in discussion. Over the duration of the seminar, each student will give one or two brief introductions to the week’s reading(s), drawing out its main themes and selecting a number of questions or puzzles for the seminar to discuss. These introductory remarks are intended merely to get the seminar rolling – students might wish to focus on something interesting, maddening or confusing about the reading for example. The seminar is designed to provide a supportive environment in which students can assist each other in conceptualising their essay and thesis, and in planning their study.

SEMINAR SCHEDULE & CONTENT

Session One,   

Reading: ‘Agent and Agency’; ‘Classification’ ‘Individuality’, ‘Interpretation’; in N. Rapport and J. Overing (2000) Social and Cultural Anthropology: The Key Concepts.

 

Session Two,   

Reading: Bourdieu, P. (1962) The Algerians

 

Session Three,   

Reading: Bourdieu, P. (2001) Masculine Domination

 

Session Four, 

Reading: Bourdieu, P. (1972) Outline of a Theory of Practice, Chapters One and Two

 

Session Five,    

Reading: Bourdieu, P. (1972) Outline of a Theory of Practice, Chapters Three and Four.

 

Session Six, 

Reading: de Certeau, M. (1984) ‘Part Two: Theories of the Art of Practice’, in Practice of Everyday Life.  

Alexander, G. (1995) ‘The Reality of Reduction: the Failed Synthesis of Pierre Bourdieu’ in Fin de Siecle Social Theory.

Reed-Danahay, D. (1995) ‘The Kabyle and the French: Occidentalism in Bourdieu’s Theory of Practice,’ in J. Carrier (ed) Occidentalism: Images of the West.

Dosse, F.  (1997) ‘Durkheim gets a Second Wind: Pierre Bourdieu’ & ‘A Middle Path: The Habitus’, in History of Structuralism, Volume 2: The Sign Sets, 1967-Present.

Bourdieu, P. (2000) ‘Making the Economic Habitus: Algerian Workers Revisited’, in Ethnography

 

Session Seven,  

Reading: Jackson, M. (1996) ‘Introduction’, in Things As They Are: New Directions in Phenomenological Anthropology.

 

Session Eight, 

Jackson, M. (1998) ‘Preamble’, ‘Returns’ & ‘Here/Now’, in Minima Ethnographica: Intersubjectivity and the Anthropological Project.

 

Session Nine

Reading

Jackson, M. (1996) Antipodes (Poems)

 

Session Ten

Reading: Castoriadis, C. (1991) ‘Power, Politics and Autonomy’, in Philosophy, Politics, Autonomy.

(1997) ‘The Imaginary: Creation in the Social-Historical Domain’, in World in Fragments: Writings on Politics, Society, Pyschoanalysis and the Imagination.

  

Session Eleven, 

Reading: Castoriadis, C. (1997) ‘Institution of Society and Religion’, in World in Fragments: Writings on Politics, Society, Pyschoanalysis and the Imagination.

Castoriadis, C. (1997) ‘Phusis and Autonomy’, in World in Fragments: Writings on Politics, Society, Pyschoanalysis and the Imagination.

 

Session Twelve, 

Reading:Rapport, N. (1997) ‘Manifesto’ & Chapters One-Five, in Transcendent Individual: Towards a Literary and Liberal Anthropology.

 

Session Thirteen, 

Reading: Rapport, N. (2001) ‘Random Mind: Towards  an Appreciation of Openess in Individual, Society and Anthropology’, plus Replies and Response by Friedman, Gray, Kapfarer, Samuual, Sokefeld, Toren and Rapport, in Australian Journal of Anthropology, 12: 2.

Rapport, N. (2003) ‘Nihilistic and Democratic Violence’ in I am Dynamite: An Alternative Anthropology of Power .

See also Rapport, N. (2008) ‘Gratiotusness: Notes Towards an Anthropology of Interiority’, in The Australian Journal of Anthropology 19, 3.

 

Policies and Procedures

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central. Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Academic Honesty Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/academic_honesty/policy.html

Assessment Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/assessment/policy_2016.html

Grade Appeal Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/gradeappeal/policy.html

Complaint Management Procedure for Students and Members of the Public http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/complaint_management/procedure.html​

Disruption to Studies Policy http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/disruption_studies/policy.html The Disruption to Studies Policy is effective from March 3 2014 and replaces the Special Consideration Policy.

In addition, a number of other policies can be found in the Learning and Teaching Category of Policy Central.

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/support/student_conduct/

Results

Results shown in iLearn, or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent. For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au.

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Learning Skills

Learning Skills (mq.edu.au/learningskills) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to improve your marks and take control of your study.

Student Enquiry Service

For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at ask.mq.edu.au

Equity Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

IT Help

For help with University computer systems and technology, visit http://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/information_technology/help/

When using the University's IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use of IT Resources Policy. The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network including students.

Graduate Capabilities

PG - Critical, Analytical and Integrative Thinking

Our postgraduates will be capable of utilising and reflecting on prior knowledge and experience, of applying higher level critical thinking skills, and of integrating and synthesising learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments. A characteristic of this form of thinking is the generation of new, professionally oriented knowledge through personal or group-based critique of practice and theory.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Students who have successfully done this unit will be able to demonstrate a significantly enhanced depth and breadth of knowledge, scholarly understanding, and specific subject content knowledge in the field of social theory.
  • Students will be able to utilize and reflect on prior knowledge and experience, of applying higher level critical thinking skills, and of integrating and synthesising learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments.
  • Students will be able to synthesize and analyze information from a variety of sources.
  • Students will be able to articulate clearly a coherent argument in written and oral form to a variety of audiences. Students will develop a high level of oral and written skills, with specialisation for the specific needs of a discipline.
  • Students will be ethically aware and capable of confident transformative action in relation to their and the wider community. They will have a sense of connectedness with others and have a sense of mutual obligation. They will be able to appreciate the impact of their ethnographic writing for social justice and inclusion related to national and global issues.

Assessment tasks

  • Major Essay
  • Seminar Participation
  • Minor Essay
  • Literature review

PG - Effective Communication

Our postgraduates will be able to communicate effectively and convey their views to different social, cultural, and professional audiences. They will be able to use a variety of technologically supported media to communicate with empathy using a range of written, spoken or visual formats.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Students who have successfully done this unit will be able to demonstrate a significantly enhanced depth and breadth of knowledge, scholarly understanding, and specific subject content knowledge in the field of social theory.
  • Students will be able to utilize and reflect on prior knowledge and experience, of applying higher level critical thinking skills, and of integrating and synthesising learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments.
  • Students will be able to synthesize and analyze information from a variety of sources.
  • Students will be able to articulate clearly a coherent argument in written and oral form to a variety of audiences. Students will develop a high level of oral and written skills, with specialisation for the specific needs of a discipline.
  • Students will be ethically aware and capable of confident transformative action in relation to their and the wider community. They will have a sense of connectedness with others and have a sense of mutual obligation. They will be able to appreciate the impact of their ethnographic writing for social justice and inclusion related to national and global issues.

Assessment tasks

  • Major Essay
  • Seminar Participation

PG - Discipline Knowledge and Skills

Our postgraduates will be able to demonstrate a significantly enhanced depth and breadth of knowledge, scholarly understanding, and specific subject content knowledge in their chosen fields.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Students who have successfully done this unit will be able to demonstrate a significantly enhanced depth and breadth of knowledge, scholarly understanding, and specific subject content knowledge in the field of social theory.
  • Students will be able to utilize and reflect on prior knowledge and experience, of applying higher level critical thinking skills, and of integrating and synthesising learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments.
  • Students will be able to synthesize and analyze information from a variety of sources.
  • Students will be able to articulate clearly a coherent argument in written and oral form to a variety of audiences. Students will develop a high level of oral and written skills, with specialisation for the specific needs of a discipline.
  • Students will be ethically aware and capable of confident transformative action in relation to their and the wider community. They will have a sense of connectedness with others and have a sense of mutual obligation. They will be able to appreciate the impact of their ethnographic writing for social justice and inclusion related to national and global issues.

Assessment tasks

  • Major Essay
  • Seminar Participation
  • Minor Essay
  • Literature review

PG - Research and Problem Solving Capability

Our postgraduates will be capable of systematic enquiry; able to use research skills to create new knowledge that can be applied to real world issues, or contribute to a field of study or practice to enhance society. They will be capable of creative questioning, problem finding and problem solving.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Students will be able to synthesize and analyze information from a variety of sources.
  • Students will be able to articulate clearly a coherent argument in written and oral form to a variety of audiences. Students will develop a high level of oral and written skills, with specialisation for the specific needs of a discipline.
  • Students will be ethically aware and capable of confident transformative action in relation to their and the wider community. They will have a sense of connectedness with others and have a sense of mutual obligation. They will be able to appreciate the impact of their ethnographic writing for social justice and inclusion related to national and global issues.

Assessment tasks

  • Major Essay
  • Seminar Participation
  • Minor Essay
  • Literature review

PG - Engaged and Responsible, Active and Ethical Citizens

Our postgraduates will be ethically aware and capable of confident transformative action in relation to their professional responsibilities and the wider community. They will have a sense of connectedness with others and country and have a sense of mutual obligation. They will be able to appreciate the impact of their professional roles for social justice and inclusion related to national and global issues

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Students who have successfully done this unit will be able to demonstrate a significantly enhanced depth and breadth of knowledge, scholarly understanding, and specific subject content knowledge in the field of social theory.
  • Students will be able to utilize and reflect on prior knowledge and experience, of applying higher level critical thinking skills, and of integrating and synthesising learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments.
  • Students will be able to synthesize and analyze information from a variety of sources.
  • Students will be able to articulate clearly a coherent argument in written and oral form to a variety of audiences. Students will develop a high level of oral and written skills, with specialisation for the specific needs of a discipline.
  • Students will be ethically aware and capable of confident transformative action in relation to their and the wider community. They will have a sense of connectedness with others and have a sense of mutual obligation. They will be able to appreciate the impact of their ethnographic writing for social justice and inclusion related to national and global issues.

Assessment tasks

  • Major Essay
  • Seminar Participation