Logo Students

GEOP462 – Social Impact Assessment

2017 – S2 Day

General Information

Pdf icon Download as PDF
Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit Convenor
Alison Ziller
Contact via alison.ziller@mq.edu.au
W3A428
by appointment
Credit points Credit points
3
Prerequisites Prerequisites
39cp at 100 level or above
Corequisites Corequisites
Co-badged status Co-badged status
Unit description Unit description
Social impact assessment (SIA) is an important tool with wide application – to planning, policy development and service delivery. This unit provides a broad overview of SIA in urban and regional environments. it addresses both the processes needed to accomplish a diligent assessment and the resources – academic research and public agency data - available to inform a range of likely scenarios and assist the assessment process. The unit provides students with several ways to facilitate stakeholder participation in and response to proposals that may affect them. It provides a theoretical understanding of the role of SIA in planning practice and, through the use of case studies, an insight into practical difficulties, common mistakes and ethical issues that are frequently encountered.

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at http://students.mq.edu.au/student_admin/enrolmentguide/academicdates/

Learning Outcomes

  1. On successful completion of this unit students will be able to : 1 Demonstrate an understanding of the practices and requirements of social impact assessment as a tool in planning systems and as a tool for community and regional development;
  2. 2 Demonstrate a knowledge of social impact issues in key planning procedures;
  3. 3 Apply knowledge and key concepts from social impact assessment to critical evaluation of planning decisions;
  4. 4 Identify and discuss different ways of integrating social issues into planning discourses and practices;
  5. 5 Express and discuss complex ideas about social change, social process and the evaluation, monitoring and mitigation of negative social impacts and enhancement of positive impacts arising from planning decisions;
  6. 6 Recognise ethical issues in planning procedures and articulate a reasoned and reflective position on appropriate standards of impact assessment in planning.

General Assessment Information

You must submit all three assignments to pass this course.

All written assignments must be submitted both electronically via the Turn-it-in system and in hard copy in class on the due date.

An assignment not submitted by the due date will attract a penalty of 5% per day (including weekend days) off the total mark of that specific course component after marking.

An extension may be granted in particular circumstances, such as verifiable illness or family misadventure. Documentation is required and the request must be made, before the due date if possible, via Ask.mq.edu.au.

Attendance at all classes is critical and the roll will be marked at each session. In the event that you are at a grade boundary in your result in this unit (including the Pass/Fail boundary) good attendance will be taken into consideration in finalising your grade. 

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Hurdle Due
Social Profile 30% 7/9/2017
Literature review 40% 12/10/2017
Short questionnaire design 30% 02/11/2017

Social Profile

Due: 7/9/2017
Weighting: 30%

Description.

The population of the City of Sydney (Sydney local government area) is forecast to grow by 45.96% between 2017 and 2036. Using the resources available on the City’s social profile and atlas, as well as data from BOCSAR, PHIDU and Health Statistics NSW, provide a social profile of three (3) current population groups in the LGA that you consider are likely to be vulnerable to this rapid rate of increase.

Tasks

1  From your reading and lectures, identify a small number of indicators to use as criteria of vulnerability for this assignment.

2  Carefully examine the social data available on the above sites for the City of Sydney local government area.

3  Identify three (3) population groups likely to be vulnerable to rapid population growth.

4  Document the current demographic or social profile and location of three (3) groups identified.

5  Explain their likely vulnerability.

Assessment criteria

i             Choice and justification of the indicators of vulnerability

ii            Presentation of the social profile

iii           Clarity of explanation of the vulnerability of each group identified

iv           Structure and succinctness of the report.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • On successful completion of this unit students will be able to : 1 Demonstrate an understanding of the practices and requirements of social impact assessment as a tool in planning systems and as a tool for community and regional development;
  • 2 Demonstrate a knowledge of social impact issues in key planning procedures;
  • 3 Apply knowledge and key concepts from social impact assessment to critical evaluation of planning decisions;
  • 4 Identify and discuss different ways of integrating social issues into planning discourses and practices;
  • 5 Express and discuss complex ideas about social change, social process and the evaluation, monitoring and mitigation of negative social impacts and enhancement of positive impacts arising from planning decisions;
  • 6 Recognise ethical issues in planning procedures and articulate a reasoned and reflective position on appropriate standards of impact assessment in planning.

Literature review

Due: 12/10/2017
Weighting: 40%

Choose one aspect of climate change for this literature review, for example, rising temperatures, drought, sea level rises, increased storm events. Conduct a literature search on the social impacts of this anticipated climate change so as to present a summary of what is currently available in the literature on this subject. Identify patterns, for example of emphasis and/or omission, in the literature you review.

Assessment criteria

i             extensiveness of research

ii            structure of the literature review

iii           clarity of presentation of themes and concerns

iv           identification of patterns and emphasis in the literature reviewed.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • On successful completion of this unit students will be able to : 1 Demonstrate an understanding of the practices and requirements of social impact assessment as a tool in planning systems and as a tool for community and regional development;
  • 2 Demonstrate a knowledge of social impact issues in key planning procedures;
  • 3 Apply knowledge and key concepts from social impact assessment to critical evaluation of planning decisions;
  • 4 Identify and discuss different ways of integrating social issues into planning discourses and practices;
  • 5 Express and discuss complex ideas about social change, social process and the evaluation, monitoring and mitigation of negative social impacts and enhancement of positive impacts arising from planning decisions;
  • 6 Recognise ethical issues in planning procedures and articulate a reasoned and reflective position on appropriate standards of impact assessment in planning.

Short questionnaire design

Due: 02/11/2017
Weighting: 30%

Assignment 3 will be developed in tutorial activities during the semester from week 9 onwards.

Students will work in small groups in class to

i) select a social impact topic suited to a short factual survey

ii) prepare 5 questions

iii) pilot the questionnaire

iv) administer the questionnaire, as approved by the course convenor, on campus

iv) present the results in class on 2 November, and

v) on 2 November submit the results (in table form say 300 words) and a brief reflection (max 500 words) on the learning process.

Assessment criteria

Criterion 1 applies to group work and Criteria 2 & 3 apply to individual work

1  clarity of questions as finally administered

2  quality of presentation of results

3  clarity and depth of reflection on learning.

 


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • On successful completion of this unit students will be able to : 1 Demonstrate an understanding of the practices and requirements of social impact assessment as a tool in planning systems and as a tool for community and regional development;
  • 2 Demonstrate a knowledge of social impact issues in key planning procedures;
  • 3 Apply knowledge and key concepts from social impact assessment to critical evaluation of planning decisions;
  • 4 Identify and discuss different ways of integrating social issues into planning discourses and practices;
  • 5 Express and discuss complex ideas about social change, social process and the evaluation, monitoring and mitigation of negative social impacts and enhancement of positive impacts arising from planning decisions;
  • 6 Recognise ethical issues in planning procedures and articulate a reasoned and reflective position on appropriate standards of impact assessment in planning.

Delivery and Resources

This unit is delivered in weekly lectures with associated class room learning activities.

Lectures are recorded on the Echo system and Powerpoint presentations will be available on iLearn

Additional resources, including some examples of similar work will be available on the Department's GeoCommons site

Detailed information about the schedule of topics will be available to students on the iLearn site for this Unit

Required readings

Textbook: The new social impact assessment handbook, by Alison Ziller is available in the Macquarie bookshop and library.

Atkinson, R. ,2015, Limited Exposure: Social Concealment, Mobility and Engagement with Public Space by the Super-Rich in London, Environment and Planning: A, pp. 1-16.

Baker W, R Bentley, L Lester and A Beer, 2016, Housing affordability and residential mobility as drivers of locational inequality, Applied Geography, 72, July 65-75

Banks, Nick, 2014, Climate Change and social justice: an evidence review, Joseph Rowntree Foundation, 18 February, http://www.jrf.org.uk/publications/climate-change-and-social-justice-evidence-review

Bradshaw, Ted K, 2008, The Post-Place Community: Contributions to the Debate about the Definition of Community, Community Development, 39:1, 5-16.

Burdge, R J, 2002, Why is social impact assessment the orphan of the assessment process? Impact Assessment and Project Appraisal, 20(1): 3-9.

Charlesworth Simon J, Paul Gilfillan and Richard Wilkinson, 2004, Living Inferiority, British Medical Bulletin, 69: 49-60, http://bmb.oxfordjournals.org/content/69/1/49.full?sid=87b77ac6-1a05-48dc-a568-6f064143534e

Ellis Hugh, 2015, The re-creation of social town planning?, Planning Theory & Practice, 16:3, 436-440, DOI: 10.1080/14649357.2015.1059062

Esteves, Ana Maria, Daniel Franks and Frank Vanclay, 2012, Social Impact Assessment: the state of the art, Impact Assessment and Project Appraisal, 30:1, 34-42

Finsterbusch, K, 1995, In praise of SIA - a personal review of the field of social impact assessment: feasibility, justification, history, methods, issues. Impact Assessment 13(3): 229-252.

Groenhart, Lucy, 2014, Understanding the spatial impacts of direct and indirect government housing expenditure, AHURI Final report no 234, Nov: http://www.ahuri.edu.au/

Holm, Daniel, Lisa Ritchie, Kirsten Snyman and Chris Sunderland, 2013, Social impact management, a review of current practice in Queensland, Australia, Impact Assessment and Project Appraisal Vol31, No3, 214-219 http://ds.doi.org/10.1080/14615517.2013.782704

Laslett A-M and others, 2015, The hidden harm, Alcohol’s impact on children and families, Foundation for Alcohol Research and Education, February: http://www.fare.org.au/wp-content/uploads/2015/02/01-ALCOHOLS-IMPACT-ON-CHILDREN-AND-FAMILIES-web.pdf

Leonardsen D, 2007, Planning of Mega Events: Experiences and Lessons, Planning Theory and Practice, 8:1, 11-30

Livingston, Michael, The social gradient of alcohol availability in Victoria, Australia, 2012, Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 36, 1, pp 41-47.

McCartney G, Hanlon P, Bond L., 2013, How will the 2014 Commonwealth Games impact on Glasgow’s health, and how will we know? Evaluation,19:24-39.

Miller Peter and Alex Wodak, FactCheck: can you change a violent drinking culture by changing how people drink? The Conversation, 10 Mar 2015: http://theconversation.com/factcheck-can-you-change-a-violent-drinking-culture-by-changing-how-people-drink-38426

Miller, Peter, Alcohol and violence: a complex issue in search of leadership, The Conversation, 14 Jan 2014: https://theconversation.com/alcohol-and-violence-a-complex-issue-in-search-of-leadership-21886 This short summary also contains links to key background reports.

Parham, Paul, 2015, Hard Evidence: will climate change affect the spread of tropical diseases?  The Conversation, 17 February: http://theconversation.com/hard-evidence-will-climate-change-affect-the-spread-of-tropical-diseases-37566

Phibbs P, and P Young, 2005, Housing assistance and non-shelter outcomes, AHURI, Final Report No. 74, February: http://www.ahuri.edu.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0010/2026/AHURI_Final_Report_No74_Housing_assistance_and_non_shelter_outcomes.pdf

Planning Institute of Australia: Social Impact Assessment Policy Position Statement: http://www.planning.org.au/policy/policy-platform

Pope, J., Bond, A., Morrison-Saunders, A., Retrief F., 2013, Advancing the theory and practice of impact assessment: Setting the research agenda, Environmental Impact Assessment Review, 41:1-9.

Randolph Bill and Andrew Tice, 2014, Suburbanizing disadvantage in Australian cities: socio-spatial change in an era of neoliberalism, Journal of Urban Affairs, vol 36, issue s1, May 2014: DOI: 10.1111/juaf.12108; http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com.simsrad.net.ocs.mq.edu.au/enhanced/doi/10.1111/juaf.12108/ 

Suh v Liverpool City Council and Casula Community Group for Responsible Planning Inc No. 2 [2016] NSWLEC: https://www.caselaw.nsw.gov.au/decision/5850cfb3e4b0e71e17f55f10

Taylor Elizabeth, Andrew Butt, and Marco Amati, Making the Blood Broil: Conflicts Over Imagined Rurality in Per-Urban Australia, Planning Practice and Research, Vol. 32 , Iss. 1, 2017

Vanclay, F and others, 2015, Social Impact Assessment: Guidance for assessing and managing the social impacts of projects, IAIA, April: www.socialimpactassessment.com/documents/IAIA%202015%20Social%20Impact%20Assessment%20guidance%20document.pdf    

Walton J, 2016, The ways of the world: Implications of political donations for the integrity of planning systems, The Henry Halloran Trust, Practitioner in Residence Program, Final Report 2015: http://sydney.edu.au/halloran/publications/WALTON_theWaysOfTheWorld.pdf

Walsh D, G McCartney, C Collins, M Taulbut and G D Batty, 2016, History, politics and vulnerability: explaining excess mortality, Glasgow Centre for Population Health, May: http://www.gcph.co.uk/publications/635_history_politics_and_vulnerability_explaining_excess_mortality

Ziller A, B Rosen and S Walsh, 2015, “Alcohol is a planning issue”, Local Government Law Journal 20, 168-183.

Ziller, Alison, 2013, The question of locality: Case study - development application for a bulk discount liquor outlet at East Nowra, NSW, Local Government Law Journal, 18, 196-207.

Ziller Alison, The community is not a place and why it matters, case study Green Square, 2004, Urban Policy and Research, 22,4, 465-479.

Ziller, Alison and Peter Phibbs, 2003, Integrating social impacts into cost-benefit analysis, a participative method: case study: the NSW area assistance scheme, Impact Assessment and Project Appraisal, vol. 21, no. 2 June, pp. 141-146.

Recommended readings:

Boniface S and Nicola Shelton, 2013, “How is alcohol consumption affected if we account for under-reporting? A hypothetical scenario”, Eur J Public Health, 23 (6): 1076-1081.doi: 10.1093/eurpub/ckt016: http://eurpub.oxfordjournals.org/content/early/2013/02/25/eurpub.ckt016.full.pdf+html

Carrington K, Hogg, R, McIntosh A, Scott J, 2012, Crime Talk, FIFO workers and Cultural Conflict on the Mining Boom Frontier. Australian Humanities Review, 53, November: http://www.australianhumanitiesreview.org/archive/Issue-November-2012/carrington_etal.html

Charlesworth Simon J, Paul Gilfillan and Richard Wilkinson, 2004, Living Inferiority, British Medical Bulletin, 69: 49-60, http://bmb.oxfordjournals.org/content/69/1/49.full?sid=87b77ac6-1a05-48dc-a568-6f064143534e

Dee, J. (2002) The Western Sydney Orbital Road: impact assessment or project justification?, Urban Policy and Research 20(4): 443-448.

Inner Sydney Regional Social Development Council, 2016, Inner Sydney Voice, winter: http://www.innersydneyvoice.org.au/editorial-winter-2016/ This edition of Inner Sydney Voice, has a series of articles on Public Housing

K2Planning, 2011, “City North Study Area, Community Infrastructure Assessment” Report for City of Melbourne Council, May: http://www.melbourne.vic.gov.au/sitecollectiondocuments/c208-community-infrastructure-assessment.pdf

Kearns Ade, Elise Whitley, Lyndal Bond, Matt Egan and Carol Tannahill, 2013, The psychosocial pathway to mental well-being at the local level: investigating the effects of perceived relative position in a deprived area context, J Epidemiology and Community Health, 67, 87-94

Leonard R, 2016, Design issues for social infrastructure in established areas: vertical schools case study, Presentation to SGS seminar on delivering social infrastructure in established areas of Melbourne, 9 March: http://www.sgsep.com.au/about/latest-news/sgs-seminar-delivering-social-infrastructure-established-areas-melbourne

Liang W and Chikritzhs T 2011 Revealing the link between licensed outlets and violence: Counting venues versus measuring alcohol availability, Drug and Alcohol Review,30 524-535

Lynch, J, G A Kaplan, et al., 1998, ‘Income Inequality and Mortality in Metropolitan Areas of the United States,’ American Journal of Public Health 88: 1074–80. 

McIntosh A, 2012, Thinking Space: Ten Truths about Australia’s Rush to Mine and the Mining Workforce, Australian Geographer, 43:4, 331-337

Nicholson, Alistair and others, 2012, Listening but not hearing: a response to the NTER Stronger Futures Consultations June to August 2011, Jumbunna Indigenous House of Learning Research Institute, 9 March: most easily accessed via http://apo.org.au/node/28591 Executive Summary.

Ombudsman NSW, 2012, Natural Justice/Procedural Fairness, Public Agency Fact Sheet, 14, March: https://www.ombo.nsw.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0017/3707/FS_PSA_14_Natural_justice_Procedural_fairness.pdf

Perrine L, 2012, Role of social infrastructure in rural and regional economic development, Presentation to RDSA Regional Infrastructure Summit, SGS Economics and Planning: http://www.sgsep.com.au/assets/20130332-Linda-Perrine-presentation-130719.pdf

Phibbs P, and P Young, 2005, Housing assistance and non-shelter outcomes, AHURI, Final Report No. 74, February: http://www.ahuri.edu.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0010/2026/AHURI_Final_Report_No74_Housing_assistance_and_non_shelter_outcomes.pdf

Portillo-Castro H, 2016, Domestic and family violence initiatives and funding across Australian jurisdictions in 2016-17, a quick guide, Australian Parliamentary Library, 28 Oct: http://www.aph.gov.au/About_Parliament/Parliamentary_Departments/Parliamentary_Library/pubs/rp/rp1617/Quick_Guides/Domestic_and_family_violence_initiatives

Ramesh, Randeep, Hélène Mulholland and Peter Walker, 2012, London looks to export council tenants, The Guardian, 24 April: http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk/2012/apr/24/london-exporting-council-tenants

Searle G, 2012, The long-term urban impacts of the Sydney Olympic Games, Australian Planner 49:3, 195-202

SGS Economics and Planning Pty Ltd, n.d., The current and future State of Victoria: a spatial perspective, See especially pp 53-59: https://www.sgsep.com.au/application/files/5214/5551/6226/150331_Final_Report_v4_160212_low_res.pdf

Smith, Katherine E., Gary Fooks, Gary, Jeff Collin, Heide Weishaar, and Anne B Gilmore, 2010, Is the increasing policy use of Impact Assessment in Europe likely to undermine efforts to achieve healthy public policy? Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, 64,4, 478-487

Walters, P and Rosenblatt, T, 2008, Cooperation or Co-presence? The Comforting Ideal of Community in a Master Planned Estate, Urban Policy and Research, 26,4, 397-413

Waitt, G. 2003, Social Impacts of the Sydney Olympics, Annals of Tourism Research 30 (1): 194-215.

Wilkinson Richard and Kate Pickett, 2012, The Spirit Level: Why More Equal Societies Almost Always Do Better, London, Penguin.

WHO Regional Office for Europe, 2009 Evidence for the effectiveness and cost effectiveness of interventions to reduce alcohol-related harm, http://www.euro.who.int/en/publications/abstracts/evidence-for-the-effectiveness-and-costeffectiveness-of-interventions-to-reduce-alcohol-related-harm Foreword, pp 65-67 and pp 76-83

Unit Schedule

A schedule of lecture topics will be provided on the iLearn site for this unit.

Policies and Procedures

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central. Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Academic Honesty Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/academic_honesty/policy.html

Assessment Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/assessment/policy_2016.html

Grade Appeal Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/gradeappeal/policy.html

Complaint Management Procedure for Students and Members of the Public http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/complaint_management/procedure.html​

Disruption to Studies Policy (in effect until Dec 4th, 2017): http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/disruption_studies/policy.html

Special Consideration Policy (in effect from Dec 4th, 2017): https://staff.mq.edu.au/work/strategy-planning-and-governance/university-policies-and-procedures/policies/special-consideration

In addition, a number of other policies can be found in the Learning and Teaching Category of Policy Central.

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/support/student_conduct/

Results

Results shown in iLearn, or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent. For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au.

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Learning Skills

Learning Skills (mq.edu.au/learningskills) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to improve your marks and take control of your study.

Student Enquiry Service

For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at ask.mq.edu.au

Equity Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

IT Help

For help with University computer systems and technology, visit http://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/information_technology/help/

When using the University's IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use of IT Resources Policy. The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network including students.

Graduate Capabilities

Discipline Specific Knowledge and Skills

Our graduates will take with them the intellectual development, depth and breadth of knowledge, scholarly understanding, and specific subject content in their chosen fields to make them competent and confident in their subject or profession. They will be able to demonstrate, where relevant, professional technical competence and meet professional standards. They will be able to articulate the structure of knowledge of their discipline, be able to adapt discipline-specific knowledge to novel situations, and be able to contribute from their discipline to inter-disciplinary solutions to problems.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • On successful completion of this unit students will be able to : 1 Demonstrate an understanding of the practices and requirements of social impact assessment as a tool in planning systems and as a tool for community and regional development;
  • 2 Demonstrate a knowledge of social impact issues in key planning procedures;
  • 3 Apply knowledge and key concepts from social impact assessment to critical evaluation of planning decisions;
  • 4 Identify and discuss different ways of integrating social issues into planning discourses and practices;
  • 5 Express and discuss complex ideas about social change, social process and the evaluation, monitoring and mitigation of negative social impacts and enhancement of positive impacts arising from planning decisions;

Assessment tasks

  • Social Profile
  • Literature review
  • Short questionnaire design

Critical, Analytical and Integrative Thinking

We want our graduates to be capable of reasoning, questioning and analysing, and to integrate and synthesise learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments; to be able to critique constraints, assumptions and limitations; to be able to think independently and systemically in relation to scholarly activity, in the workplace, and in the world. We want them to have a level of scientific and information technology literacy.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • On successful completion of this unit students will be able to : 1 Demonstrate an understanding of the practices and requirements of social impact assessment as a tool in planning systems and as a tool for community and regional development;
  • 2 Demonstrate a knowledge of social impact issues in key planning procedures;
  • 3 Apply knowledge and key concepts from social impact assessment to critical evaluation of planning decisions;
  • 4 Identify and discuss different ways of integrating social issues into planning discourses and practices;
  • 5 Express and discuss complex ideas about social change, social process and the evaluation, monitoring and mitigation of negative social impacts and enhancement of positive impacts arising from planning decisions;
  • 6 Recognise ethical issues in planning procedures and articulate a reasoned and reflective position on appropriate standards of impact assessment in planning.

Assessment tasks

  • Social Profile
  • Literature review
  • Short questionnaire design

Problem Solving and Research Capability

Our graduates should be capable of researching; of analysing, and interpreting and assessing data and information in various forms; of drawing connections across fields of knowledge; and they should be able to relate their knowledge to complex situations at work or in the world, in order to diagnose and solve problems. We want them to have the confidence to take the initiative in doing so, within an awareness of their own limitations.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • On successful completion of this unit students will be able to : 1 Demonstrate an understanding of the practices and requirements of social impact assessment as a tool in planning systems and as a tool for community and regional development;
  • 2 Demonstrate a knowledge of social impact issues in key planning procedures;
  • 3 Apply knowledge and key concepts from social impact assessment to critical evaluation of planning decisions;
  • 4 Identify and discuss different ways of integrating social issues into planning discourses and practices;
  • 5 Express and discuss complex ideas about social change, social process and the evaluation, monitoring and mitigation of negative social impacts and enhancement of positive impacts arising from planning decisions;
  • 6 Recognise ethical issues in planning procedures and articulate a reasoned and reflective position on appropriate standards of impact assessment in planning.

Assessment tasks

  • Social Profile
  • Literature review
  • Short questionnaire design

Creative and Innovative

Our graduates will also be capable of creative thinking and of creating knowledge. They will be imaginative and open to experience and capable of innovation at work and in the community. We want them to be engaged in applying their critical, creative thinking.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • On successful completion of this unit students will be able to : 1 Demonstrate an understanding of the practices and requirements of social impact assessment as a tool in planning systems and as a tool for community and regional development;
  • 4 Identify and discuss different ways of integrating social issues into planning discourses and practices;

Assessment task

  • Short questionnaire design

Effective Communication

We want to develop in our students the ability to communicate and convey their views in forms effective with different audiences. We want our graduates to take with them the capability to read, listen, question, gather and evaluate information resources in a variety of formats, assess, write clearly, speak effectively, and to use visual communication and communication technologies as appropriate.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • On successful completion of this unit students will be able to : 1 Demonstrate an understanding of the practices and requirements of social impact assessment as a tool in planning systems and as a tool for community and regional development;
  • 2 Demonstrate a knowledge of social impact issues in key planning procedures;
  • 3 Apply knowledge and key concepts from social impact assessment to critical evaluation of planning decisions;
  • 4 Identify and discuss different ways of integrating social issues into planning discourses and practices;
  • 5 Express and discuss complex ideas about social change, social process and the evaluation, monitoring and mitigation of negative social impacts and enhancement of positive impacts arising from planning decisions;

Assessment tasks

  • Social Profile
  • Literature review
  • Short questionnaire design

Engaged and Ethical Local and Global citizens

As local citizens our graduates will be aware of indigenous perspectives and of the nation's historical context. They will be engaged with the challenges of contemporary society and with knowledge and ideas. We want our graduates to have respect for diversity, to be open-minded, sensitive to others and inclusive, and to be open to other cultures and perspectives: they should have a level of cultural literacy. Our graduates should be aware of disadvantage and social justice, and be willing to participate to help create a wiser and better society.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • On successful completion of this unit students will be able to : 1 Demonstrate an understanding of the practices and requirements of social impact assessment as a tool in planning systems and as a tool for community and regional development;
  • 2 Demonstrate a knowledge of social impact issues in key planning procedures;
  • 3 Apply knowledge and key concepts from social impact assessment to critical evaluation of planning decisions;
  • 4 Identify and discuss different ways of integrating social issues into planning discourses and practices;
  • 5 Express and discuss complex ideas about social change, social process and the evaluation, monitoring and mitigation of negative social impacts and enhancement of positive impacts arising from planning decisions;
  • 6 Recognise ethical issues in planning procedures and articulate a reasoned and reflective position on appropriate standards of impact assessment in planning.

Assessment tasks

  • Literature review
  • Short questionnaire design

Socially and Environmentally Active and Responsible

We want our graduates to be aware of and have respect for self and others; to be able to work with others as a leader and a team player; to have a sense of connectedness with others and country; and to have a sense of mutual obligation. Our graduates should be informed and active participants in moving society towards sustainability.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • On successful completion of this unit students will be able to : 1 Demonstrate an understanding of the practices and requirements of social impact assessment as a tool in planning systems and as a tool for community and regional development;
  • 2 Demonstrate a knowledge of social impact issues in key planning procedures;
  • 3 Apply knowledge and key concepts from social impact assessment to critical evaluation of planning decisions;
  • 4 Identify and discuss different ways of integrating social issues into planning discourses and practices;
  • 6 Recognise ethical issues in planning procedures and articulate a reasoned and reflective position on appropriate standards of impact assessment in planning.

Assessment tasks

  • Social Profile
  • Literature review
  • Short questionnaire design

Capable of Professional and Personal Judgement and Initiative

We want our graduates to have emotional intelligence and sound interpersonal skills and to demonstrate discernment and common sense in their professional and personal judgement. They will exercise initiative as needed. They will be capable of risk assessment, and be able to handle ambiguity and complexity, enabling them to be adaptable in diverse and changing environments.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • On successful completion of this unit students will be able to : 1 Demonstrate an understanding of the practices and requirements of social impact assessment as a tool in planning systems and as a tool for community and regional development;
  • 2 Demonstrate a knowledge of social impact issues in key planning procedures;
  • 3 Apply knowledge and key concepts from social impact assessment to critical evaluation of planning decisions;
  • 4 Identify and discuss different ways of integrating social issues into planning discourses and practices;
  • 5 Express and discuss complex ideas about social change, social process and the evaluation, monitoring and mitigation of negative social impacts and enhancement of positive impacts arising from planning decisions;
  • 6 Recognise ethical issues in planning procedures and articulate a reasoned and reflective position on appropriate standards of impact assessment in planning.

Assessment tasks

  • Social Profile
  • Literature review
  • Short questionnaire design

Changes from Previous Offering

Assignments, readings and the selection of contemporary social issues are updated each year.