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GEOP215 – Geographies of Development

2017 – S2 Day

General Information

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Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff Convenor
Sara Fuller
W3A 414
Lecturer/Tutor
Matalena Tofa
Lecturer
Sunita Chaudhary
Credit points Credit points
3
Prerequisites Prerequisites
ENVG111 or GEOS111 or GEOP111
Corequisites Corequisites
Co-badged status Co-badged status
Unit description Unit description
This unit provides a geographical perspective on social, cultural, economic, political and environmental development at a variety of scales from the global to the local, drawing evidence from around the world. Topics include: the legacies of colonialism and imperialism; international trade, debt and foreign aid; regional change in rural areas; impacts of industrialisation, transnational corporations and technological change; the changing nature of work; and the role of governments in regional and local development.

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at http://students.mq.edu.au/student_admin/enrolmentguide/academicdates/

Learning Outcomes

  1. Demonstrate an understanding of international development issues at a variety of scales from global to local drawing on evidence from regions around the world.
  2. Critically assess the concept of development, and the range of theories and approaches to development geography.
  3. Interrelate theory and concepts in development studies with contemporary change processes that are taking place in a range of regional contexts.
  4. Communicate effectively and present an argument in written and verbal forms.
  5. Demonstrate research skills by evaluating and synthesising information from a variety of sources

General Assessment Information

Assignment requirements and submission

Detailed requirements and marking rubrics for each assessment are available from the iLearn site. All written assignments should be submitted online to Turnitin via the relevant links provided in iLearn. You are not required to submit a hardcopy of any assignments. Instructions for assignment submission using Turnitin are available at http://mq.edu.au/iLearn/student_info/assignments.htm

Assessment extensions and late penalties

Circumstances that affect your ability to complete assignments by the deadline must be discussed with the convenor (Sara) prior to the due date. Extensions will be granted only in unforeseen or exceptional circumstances. Appropriate supporting documentation as detailed in the University Disruption to Studies Policy will be required. The penalty for late submission of assignments is 1 mark per day (i.e. 1% of your total unit grade). An assignment worth 10% coming in 4 days late will therefore have 4 marks of the grade deducted. This means if it was graded as a P+ (6.5/10), it would be reduced to F (2.5/10). An assignment worth 30% coming in 4 days late would have 4 marks of the grade deducted. This means it would go from a P+ (19/30) to P- (15/30). Late assignments will not be accepted after the bulk of marked assignments have been returned to students.

Assessment feedback

All written assignments will be marked online and your grades will be returned to you through Turnitin. The grade will be in the form of a letter as consistent with University policy (HD, D, Cr, P, F) alongside individual written feedback. The standard return period for assessments is 3 weeks.

Tutorial participation

More details about tutorial participation and the group presentation is available on iLearn and will be explained in the first tutorial in week 2. All internal students are expected to attend tutorials. If you are ill and cannot make a tutorial, please contact the convenor. You will be required to present supporting evidence (e.g. medical certificates) for non-attendance.

Exams

Details of University exam conditions and exam timetables can be found at: http://www.exams.mq.edu.au/ It is very important to note that the final exam period includes weekdays and weekends and all students (including international exchange students) are expected to present themselves for the GEOP215 exam at the time and place designated in the exam timetable. The timetable will be available in Draft form approximately eight weeks before the commencement of the exams and in Final form approximately four weeks before the commencement of the exams.

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Due
Participation & presentation 15% Ongoing
Review Essay 15% Fri 25th Aug (midnight)
Research essay 35% Fri 20th Oct (midnight)
Exam 35% Exam period

Participation & presentation

Due: Ongoing
Weighting: 15%

This assessment task is comprised of two elements: a) attendance at tutorials throughout semester and active participation in discussions based on assigned readings and b) group presentation based on a specific case study.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Demonstrate an understanding of international development issues at a variety of scales from global to local drawing on evidence from regions around the world.
  • Critically assess the concept of development, and the range of theories and approaches to development geography.
  • Interrelate theory and concepts in development studies with contemporary change processes that are taking place in a range of regional contexts.
  • Communicate effectively and present an argument in written and verbal forms.
  • Demonstrate research skills by evaluating and synthesising information from a variety of sources

Review Essay

Due: Fri 25th Aug (midnight)
Weighting: 15%

Length: 1000 words

Write a review essay using only the readings provided. The essay should explain what you think are the most important aspects of development and why.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Demonstrate an understanding of international development issues at a variety of scales from global to local drawing on evidence from regions around the world.
  • Critically assess the concept of development, and the range of theories and approaches to development geography.
  • Communicate effectively and present an argument in written and verbal forms.

Research essay

Due: Fri 20th Oct (midnight)
Weighting: 35%

Length: 2500 words

Write a formal essay in response to one of the questions provided. Your essay should construct a coherent argument in response to the question, provide evidence based on rigorous research to back up each point, and utilise a case study (or studies).


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Demonstrate an understanding of international development issues at a variety of scales from global to local drawing on evidence from regions around the world.
  • Critically assess the concept of development, and the range of theories and approaches to development geography.
  • Interrelate theory and concepts in development studies with contemporary change processes that are taking place in a range of regional contexts.
  • Communicate effectively and present an argument in written and verbal forms.
  • Demonstrate research skills by evaluating and synthesising information from a variety of sources

Exam

Due: Exam period
Weighting: 35%

A compulsory two hour examination in the end-of-semester examination period. It will examine your grasp of material provided across the unit, including readings, lectures, tutorials and assessment tasks.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Demonstrate an understanding of international development issues at a variety of scales from global to local drawing on evidence from regions around the world.
  • Critically assess the concept of development, and the range of theories and approaches to development geography.
  • Interrelate theory and concepts in development studies with contemporary change processes that are taking place in a range of regional contexts.
  • Communicate effectively and present an argument in written and verbal forms.

Delivery and Resources

Classes

Weekly classes involve 2 hours of lectures and a 1 hour tutorial.

  • Lectures: Thursday 9-11
  • Tutorials: Thursday 11-12, 12-1, 2-3

Required and recommended reading

Required reading

The core text for this unit is:

  • Williams, G., Meth., P and Willis, K. (2014) Geographies of Developing Areas: The Global South in a Changing World. London: Routledge (2nd edition)

Access to this text is essential for completing the requirements of this unit. The text is available for purchase through the Co-op Bookshop on campus. Copies are also available in the Library. In addition there are a range of journal articles and chapters that are required reading for tutorials. These will be listed on iLearn and available via MultiSearch.

Recommended reading

In addition to the core text, the texts listed below provide information on many of the general themes covered in the unit. Copies can be found in the Library.

  • Desai, V. and Potter, RB. (eds) (2014) The companion to development studies, London: Hodder Arnold (3rd Edition)
  • Potter, RB., Conway, D., Evans R. and Lloyd-Evans, S. (2012) Key concepts in development geography, Sage: London.
  • Potter, RB., Binns, T., Elliott, JA. and Smith, D. (2008) Geographies of Development: An introduction to development studies. Essex: Pearson Education. (3rd Edition)
  • Willis, K. (2011) Theories and Practices of Development. London: Routledge. (2nd Edition)

The below text is also a helpful resource and is available in the library:

  • Hay, I. (2012) Communicating in Geography and the Environmental Sciences. Melbourne: Oxford University Press (4th Edition).

Technology used and required

All enrolled students have access to the GEOP215 website via iLearn. iLearn will provide access to lectures (powerpoint presentations for download and recordings through the University's echo360 lecture recording facility) as well as readings, links and forum discussions. Regular access to iLearn is required in order to complete the unit.

Unit Schedule

Week w/c Lecture Tutorial and Assessment
Module 1: Introducing the Global South
1 31st July Development geography and the Global South (SF) No tutorial
2 7th Aug Approaches to development (SF) Tutorial: Representing the Global South
Module 2: The South in a global world
3 14th Aug A changing world order (SF) Tutorial: Legacies of colonialism
4 21st Aug

A globalising economy (SF)

Tutorial: Globalisation and the environment

Review essay due Fri 25th Aug

5 28th Aug Social and cultural change (SF)

Tutorial: Urbanisation and informality

6 4th Sept Global environmental change  (SF) Tutorial: Climate justice
Module 3: Living in the South
7 11th Sept Political lives (SC) Tutorial: Group presentations
Learning and Teaching Break 18th-29th Sept
8 2nd Oct

Making a living (SC)

Tutorial: Livelihood strategies and the diverse economy

9 9th Oct Ways of living (SC)

Tutorial: Modernity and consumption

Module 4: Making a difference
10 16th Oct Governing development (MT)

Tutorial: Aid and good governance

Research essay due Fri 20th Oct

11 23rd Oct Markets and development (MT) Tutorial: Fair trade and ethical consumption
12 30th Oct Grassroots development (MT)

Tutorial: Participation and civil society

13 6th Nov Unit overview (SF) Tutorial: Exam revision
Exam period 13th Nov-1st Dec

Teaching staff: Dr Sara Fuller (SF); Dr Matalena Tofa (MT); Sunita Chaudhary (SC).

Policies and Procedures

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central. Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Academic Honesty Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/academic_honesty/policy.html

Assessment Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/assessment/policy_2016.html

Grade Appeal Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/gradeappeal/policy.html

Complaint Management Procedure for Students and Members of the Public http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/complaint_management/procedure.html​

Disruption to Studies Policy http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/disruption_studies/policy.html The Disruption to Studies Policy is effective from March 3 2014 and replaces the Special Consideration Policy.

In addition, a number of other policies can be found in the Learning and Teaching Category of Policy Central.

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/support/student_conduct/

Results

Results shown in iLearn, or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent. For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au.

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Learning Skills

Learning Skills (mq.edu.au/learningskills) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to improve your marks and take control of your study.

Student Enquiry Service

For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at ask.mq.edu.au

Equity Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

IT Help

For help with University computer systems and technology, visit http://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/information_technology/help/

When using the University's IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use of IT Resources Policy. The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network including students.

Graduate Capabilities

Discipline Specific Knowledge and Skills

Our graduates will take with them the intellectual development, depth and breadth of knowledge, scholarly understanding, and specific subject content in their chosen fields to make them competent and confident in their subject or profession. They will be able to demonstrate, where relevant, professional technical competence and meet professional standards. They will be able to articulate the structure of knowledge of their discipline, be able to adapt discipline-specific knowledge to novel situations, and be able to contribute from their discipline to inter-disciplinary solutions to problems.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Demonstrate an understanding of international development issues at a variety of scales from global to local drawing on evidence from regions around the world.
  • Critically assess the concept of development, and the range of theories and approaches to development geography.
  • Interrelate theory and concepts in development studies with contemporary change processes that are taking place in a range of regional contexts.

Assessment tasks

  • Participation & presentation
  • Review Essay
  • Research essay
  • Exam

Critical, Analytical and Integrative Thinking

We want our graduates to be capable of reasoning, questioning and analysing, and to integrate and synthesise learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments; to be able to critique constraints, assumptions and limitations; to be able to think independently and systemically in relation to scholarly activity, in the workplace, and in the world. We want them to have a level of scientific and information technology literacy.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Demonstrate an understanding of international development issues at a variety of scales from global to local drawing on evidence from regions around the world.
  • Critically assess the concept of development, and the range of theories and approaches to development geography.
  • Interrelate theory and concepts in development studies with contemporary change processes that are taking place in a range of regional contexts.

Assessment tasks

  • Participation & presentation
  • Review Essay
  • Research essay
  • Exam

Problem Solving and Research Capability

Our graduates should be capable of researching; of analysing, and interpreting and assessing data and information in various forms; of drawing connections across fields of knowledge; and they should be able to relate their knowledge to complex situations at work or in the world, in order to diagnose and solve problems. We want them to have the confidence to take the initiative in doing so, within an awareness of their own limitations.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Critically assess the concept of development, and the range of theories and approaches to development geography.
  • Interrelate theory and concepts in development studies with contemporary change processes that are taking place in a range of regional contexts.
  • Demonstrate research skills by evaluating and synthesising information from a variety of sources

Assessment tasks

  • Participation & presentation
  • Review Essay
  • Research essay
  • Exam

Effective Communication

We want to develop in our students the ability to communicate and convey their views in forms effective with different audiences. We want our graduates to take with them the capability to read, listen, question, gather and evaluate information resources in a variety of formats, assess, write clearly, speak effectively, and to use visual communication and communication technologies as appropriate.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Communicate effectively and present an argument in written and verbal forms.
  • Demonstrate research skills by evaluating and synthesising information from a variety of sources

Assessment tasks

  • Participation & presentation
  • Review Essay
  • Research essay
  • Exam

Engaged and Ethical Local and Global citizens

As local citizens our graduates will be aware of indigenous perspectives and of the nation's historical context. They will be engaged with the challenges of contemporary society and with knowledge and ideas. We want our graduates to have respect for diversity, to be open-minded, sensitive to others and inclusive, and to be open to other cultures and perspectives: they should have a level of cultural literacy. Our graduates should be aware of disadvantage and social justice, and be willing to participate to help create a wiser and better society.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • Interrelate theory and concepts in development studies with contemporary change processes that are taking place in a range of regional contexts.

Assessment tasks

  • Participation & presentation
  • Research essay
  • Exam