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INED820 – Research Methods in Indigenous Education

2017 – S2 External

General Information

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Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit Convenor
Associate Professor Sandy O'Sullivan
Contact via Email
via email
Head of Department
Professor Bronwyn Carlson
Contact via Email
W3A 411
Bronwyn Carlson
Credit points Credit points
4
Prerequisites Prerequisites
Admission to MIndigenousEd or GradDipIndigenousEd or GradCertIndigenousEd
Corequisites Corequisites
Co-badged status Co-badged status
Unit description Unit description
This research unit is organised around a hypothetical research project which students begin to develop themselves without actually carrying out. This unit will facilitate the first stages of the research. Assessment tasks for this unit will produce an ethics application, research proposal and design and an annotated bibliography.

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at http://students.mq.edu.au/student_admin/enrolmentguide/academicdates/

Learning Outcomes

  1. Investigate the ethical and methodological requirements of ethical research with Indigenous Peoples, Communities and Knowledge(s)
  2. Analyse, identify and evaluate issues concerning research in Indigenous contexts.
  3. Choose an Indigenous research topic and develop your own research questions in relation to the topic.
  4. Evaluate the complexities of conducting research with Indigenous Peoples, Communities and Knowledge(s).
  5. Critically reflect on your responsibilities as a researcher in practice contexts.
  6. Critically engage with the perspectives of other students using the prescribed online technology (ilearn).

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Due
Essay 45% 09/10/2016
Research Proposal 55% 06/11/2017

Essay

Due: 09/10/2016
Weighting: 45%

Draft submission Monday 25th September 2017 

Final submission due Monday 9th October 2017

A detailed rubric for the standards and criteria against which this task will be assessed are supplied in the Assessment section in iLearn.

The essay has two parts.

Part 1 - Prepare an essay plan to be submitted in a 'weekly response'. The essay plan will need to be submitted by the 25th of September. The essay plan will replace the weekly response for that week.

Part 2 - Write an essay of 2000 words which critically engages the topic of Indigenous research in the Australian context, drawing on similar countries that have a growing movement of Indigenous researchers, academics and Indigenous research methodologies and methods.  This essay can cover any aspect of Indigenous research (does not have to be Education-focused, or can be an aspect of Indigenous Education) as put forward by you in your essay plan.

This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:

  • Analyse, identify and evaluate issues concerning research in Indigenous contexts
  • Evaluate the complexities of conducting research with Indigenous people and communities.
  • Critically engage with the perspectives of other students using the prescribed online technology (ilearn). 

This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Investigate the ethical and methodological requirements of ethical research with Indigenous Peoples, Communities and Knowledge(s)
  • Analyse, identify and evaluate issues concerning research in Indigenous contexts.
  • Evaluate the complexities of conducting research with Indigenous Peoples, Communities and Knowledge(s).
  • Critically reflect on your responsibilities as a researcher in practice contexts.
  • Critically engage with the perspectives of other students using the prescribed online technology (ilearn).

Research Proposal

Due: 06/11/2017
Weighting: 55%

You are required to write a 2000 (up to 2500) word research proposal for a hypothetical doctoral research project focused on an aspect of Indigenous education in an Australian context. A detailed rubric for the standards and criteria against which this task will be assessed are supplied in the Assessment section in iLearn.

The research proposal is an integral component to all research projects even outside of postgraduate studies. Breaking the study down into smaller sections makes the overall task appear less daunting and will make them more manageable. Designing your research provides an avenue for you to unpack your ideas and identify areas where there may be gaps in terms of understanding and development. The research proposal is a means of planning and structuring your research, and articulating what you hope to achieve, and how you plan to go about it. With this kind of proposal you are not required to do any actual research. This assessment is only the design of a project, and it's formed proposal.

Some of you may be thinking of undertaking Higher Degree Research (HDR) in the future: this task will prove highly beneficial to this cohort. The following headings should guide your thinking and are standard across most research proposals. However, if there are any additional headings you believe are integral to your research you may include them in the research proposal. There will be many useful resources online to assist you in writing a generic proposal, however there will be attention paid to the way that you acknowledge and incorporate Indigenous Peoples, Communities and Knowledge(s) in your project, following on from what you learned in your essay. Your essay will have given you an grounding of ethical and cultural considerations in conducting research alongside Indigenous peoples.

 

COMPONENTS OF A RESEARCH PROPOSAL MAY LOOK LIKE THIS

Title

Provide a short title for your project. If you can, give it a memorable/catchy title. For example,  leading Torres Strait Islander academic Professor Martin Nakata wrote a book called ‘Disciplining the savages: Savaging the Disciplines’.

Introduction (approx. 200 words)

Provide a brief introduction to the research, including an introduction to who you are; position yourself. Provide a brief background about your research topic without going directly into what you plan to do. Here you need to include some references!

Research Aim /Questions (approx. 100 words)

Describe the key aims of the research. What questions do you seek to answer? These questions often include words such as identify, establish, develop; and phrases such as “how do…” “what are…” “how can…”.

Significance (approx. 200 words)

Explain why your research will be significant. All research should anticipate some benefits but as you will have learned in your preparations toward writing your essay, Indigenous research has specific requirements regarding who benefits, and how you demonstrate this benefit.

Literature Review (approx. 600 words)

Any research project is expected to fill a gap in existing research.  Usually a topic or area of study no one has fully covered, or, a new way of looking at something other research has covered. You need to locate literature in the areas related to your research question – including research findings written by Indigenous people throughout the world either specifically on the topic or across similar topics that relate and strengthen your argument. Your literature review needs to convince the reader/examiner that you already know what others have found across your topic. 

Methodology (approx. 300 words)

This is the “process” as well as the underpinning beliefs and the way that you go about your research. It also includes the research tools, or methods, you intend to use to gain data in your project.

Here you need to convince the reader that you have a clear process in terms of how you will go about your research. You need to describe in detail the steps you will take in the project.  How will you collect your data? Will you be relying on publicly accessible information (such as literature or archival evidence), will you speak with participants?  Here you also need to mention details relating to participants, including how you will recruit them, the numbers of people you intend to engage in the study, and demographic . Data collection – Will you be recording the data, if so how (audio, visual etc)?

Ethical Issues (approx. 150 words)

Describe any ethical dilemmas you may have in undertaking your project. These are particularly important, especially when working with young people, those at risk, Indigenous people, or vulnerable communities. Your essay will assist in the cultural issues you will also note in this section, such as appropriateness of gender, age and questions.

Note: Remember the AIATSIS and NHMRC Ethics Guidelines when writing your methodology and your ethics area.

Timeline (approx. 150 words)

Provide a detailed summary of your plan to undertake your project. Your timeline must include all parts of the project, fro the literature review you must conduct, through to actually going out into the field and conducting interviews or related activities, through to data analysis and writing up. Most PhD research programs stretch from 2.5 to 5 years in length, to give one example of how long a timeline might be.

Communication of Results (approx. 150 words)

It is normal practice for research results to be disseminated to research participants and academic peers. Explain how you plan to

communicate the results of your research project. This includes peer-reviewed articles, publications, presentations, monographs, exhibitions and or a thesis.

References

Provide at least 15 references.  

Word Count

Between 2000-2500 words (References included).

This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:

• Investigate the ethical and methodological requirements of ethical research with Indigenous Peoples, Communities and Knowledge(s).

• Analyse, identify and evaluate issues concerning research in Indigenous contexts.

• Choose an area of Indigenous research and develop your own research questions in relation to the topic.

• Evaluate the complexities of conducting research with Indigenous People and Communities and Knowledge(s).

• Critically reflect on your responsibilities as a researcher in practice contexts.

 


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Investigate the ethical and methodological requirements of ethical research with Indigenous Peoples, Communities and Knowledge(s)
  • Analyse, identify and evaluate issues concerning research in Indigenous contexts.
  • Choose an Indigenous research topic and develop your own research questions in relation to the topic.
  • Evaluate the complexities of conducting research with Indigenous Peoples, Communities and Knowledge(s).
  • Critically reflect on your responsibilities as a researcher in practice contexts.

Delivery and Resources

Unit Requirements

During the unit students will be required to access the Learning Management System to:

  • Submit the required assessment tasks  in a timely manner.
  • Complete all the required readings for the unit.
  • Contribute to online discussions and activities.
  • Engage with the course materials

Online Participation Guidelines

A significant part of your online learning experience involves learning with and from other students and the teacher in the online discussions and activities. Active participation means sharing information and resources, posting your own ideas, and critiquing or expanding on the ideas of others in a respectful and collegial fashion. You are expected to follow accepted standards of English spelling, grammar and punctuation, when you are participating in web discussions or sending emails. These discussions are for you to exchange your reflections with your classmates and teacher about what you are learning. The discussions will be organised into forums around the particular themes you are studying.

As an online student in an advanced degree, you will be taking a proactive approach to your learning. The Unit Convenor’s role is to support your learning, your role is to engage your own learning. You will be managing your own time so that you can complete the readings, activities and assignments for the unit. It is anticipated that if you have genuine difficulties that you will approach the Unit Convenor, and also that you use the opportunity to ask questions and share some of your thoughts and ideas within the collaborative online learning space.

Submission of Assignment

All work is to be submitted via the Turnitin function inside the ilearn site.

Return of marked work

Marked work will be returned to students electronically via ilearn.

Electronic Submissions

Information about how to submit work online can be accessed through the ilearn unit. 

Examinations

There are no examinations in this unit.

Completion of Assessment Tasks

Please email the unit convenor (Sandy) if you find yourself unable to meet the submission dates for assessments.

Technology

Online units can be accessed at: https://ilearn.mq.edu.au/login/MQ/

1. For technical support with passwords or to check if the Learning Management System (LMS) is down, go tohttp://informatics.mq.edu.au/help/

2. This unit is taught fully on line and access to the internet and a computer are essentail (mobile technology such as an iphone or ipad are not sufficent for this course).

3. For Learning & Teaching issues e.g. how to access your online materials such as readings, i-lecture, please contact the Unit Convenor.

4. For basic training in how to use the LMS, please go to http://mq.edu.au/iLearn/student_info/index.htm

Policies and Procedures

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central. Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Academic Honesty Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/academic_honesty/policy.html

Assessment Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/assessment/policy_2016.html

Grade Appeal Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/gradeappeal/policy.html

Complaint Management Procedure for Students and Members of the Public http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/complaint_management/procedure.html​

Disruption to Studies Policy http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/disruption_studies/policy.html The Disruption to Studies Policy is effective from March 3 2014 and replaces the Special Consideration Policy.

In addition, a number of other policies can be found in the Learning and Teaching Category of Policy Central.

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/support/student_conduct/

Results

Results shown in iLearn, or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent. For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au.

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Learning Skills

Learning Skills (mq.edu.au/learningskills) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to improve your marks and take control of your study.

Student Enquiry Service

For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at ask.mq.edu.au

Equity Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

IT Help

For help with University computer systems and technology, visit http://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/information_technology/help/

When using the University's IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use of IT Resources Policy. The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network including students.

Graduate Capabilities

PG - Discipline Knowledge and Skills

Our postgraduates will be able to demonstrate a significantly enhanced depth and breadth of knowledge, scholarly understanding, and specific subject content knowledge in their chosen fields.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Investigate the ethical and methodological requirements of ethical research with Indigenous Peoples, Communities and Knowledge(s)
  • Analyse, identify and evaluate issues concerning research in Indigenous contexts.
  • Choose an Indigenous research topic and develop your own research questions in relation to the topic.
  • Evaluate the complexities of conducting research with Indigenous Peoples, Communities and Knowledge(s).
  • Critically reflect on your responsibilities as a researcher in practice contexts.

Assessment tasks

  • Essay
  • Research Proposal

PG - Critical, Analytical and Integrative Thinking

Our postgraduates will be capable of utilising and reflecting on prior knowledge and experience, of applying higher level critical thinking skills, and of integrating and synthesising learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments. A characteristic of this form of thinking is the generation of new, professionally oriented knowledge through personal or group-based critique of practice and theory.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Analyse, identify and evaluate issues concerning research in Indigenous contexts.
  • Evaluate the complexities of conducting research with Indigenous Peoples, Communities and Knowledge(s).
  • Critically reflect on your responsibilities as a researcher in practice contexts.
  • Critically engage with the perspectives of other students using the prescribed online technology (ilearn).

Assessment tasks

  • Essay
  • Research Proposal

PG - Research and Problem Solving Capability

Our postgraduates will be capable of systematic enquiry; able to use research skills to create new knowledge that can be applied to real world issues, or contribute to a field of study or practice to enhance society. They will be capable of creative questioning, problem finding and problem solving.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Investigate the ethical and methodological requirements of ethical research with Indigenous Peoples, Communities and Knowledge(s)
  • Analyse, identify and evaluate issues concerning research in Indigenous contexts.
  • Choose an Indigenous research topic and develop your own research questions in relation to the topic.
  • Evaluate the complexities of conducting research with Indigenous Peoples, Communities and Knowledge(s).
  • Critically reflect on your responsibilities as a researcher in practice contexts.

Assessment tasks

  • Essay
  • Research Proposal

PG - Effective Communication

Our postgraduates will be able to communicate effectively and convey their views to different social, cultural, and professional audiences. They will be able to use a variety of technologically supported media to communicate with empathy using a range of written, spoken or visual formats.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Investigate the ethical and methodological requirements of ethical research with Indigenous Peoples, Communities and Knowledge(s)
  • Analyse, identify and evaluate issues concerning research in Indigenous contexts.
  • Choose an Indigenous research topic and develop your own research questions in relation to the topic.
  • Evaluate the complexities of conducting research with Indigenous Peoples, Communities and Knowledge(s).
  • Critically reflect on your responsibilities as a researcher in practice contexts.
  • Critically engage with the perspectives of other students using the prescribed online technology (ilearn).

Assessment tasks

  • Essay
  • Research Proposal

PG - Engaged and Responsible, Active and Ethical Citizens

Our postgraduates will be ethically aware and capable of confident transformative action in relation to their professional responsibilities and the wider community. They will have a sense of connectedness with others and country and have a sense of mutual obligation. They will be able to appreciate the impact of their professional roles for social justice and inclusion related to national and global issues

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Investigate the ethical and methodological requirements of ethical research with Indigenous Peoples, Communities and Knowledge(s)
  • Analyse, identify and evaluate issues concerning research in Indigenous contexts.
  • Choose an Indigenous research topic and develop your own research questions in relation to the topic.
  • Evaluate the complexities of conducting research with Indigenous Peoples, Communities and Knowledge(s).
  • Critically reflect on your responsibilities as a researcher in practice contexts.
  • Critically engage with the perspectives of other students using the prescribed online technology (ilearn).

Assessment tasks

  • Essay
  • Research Proposal

PG - Capable of Professional and Personal Judgment and Initiative

Our postgraduates will demonstrate a high standard of discernment and common sense in their professional and personal judgment. They will have the ability to make informed choices and decisions that reflect both the nature of their professional work and their personal perspectives.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Investigate the ethical and methodological requirements of ethical research with Indigenous Peoples, Communities and Knowledge(s)
  • Analyse, identify and evaluate issues concerning research in Indigenous contexts.
  • Choose an Indigenous research topic and develop your own research questions in relation to the topic.
  • Evaluate the complexities of conducting research with Indigenous Peoples, Communities and Knowledge(s).
  • Critically reflect on your responsibilities as a researcher in practice contexts.
  • Critically engage with the perspectives of other students using the prescribed online technology (ilearn).

Assessment tasks

  • Essay
  • Research Proposal