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GEOP330 – Asia-Pacific Development

2017 – S2 External

General Information

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Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit Convenor and Tutor
Dr Ann El Khoury
Contact via Email and iLearn forum
W3A 434
During term, Wednesdays 11:00 am-1:00 pm or by appointment
Fiona Miller
Credit points Credit points
3
Prerequisites Prerequisites
(39cp at 100 level or above including 3cp in GEOP or ANTH units at 300 level) or admission to GDipArts
Corequisites Corequisites
Co-badged status Co-badged status
Unit description Unit description
The Asia–Pacific is a highly differentiated and dynamic region undergoing rapid social, spatial and political transformation. Communities and governments within the Asia–Pacific region are continually dealing with dilemmas associated with development, economic, political and environmental change and contestation by various stakeholders over resources at various scales (international, national and local level). Aid organisations, national bodies and foreign affairs departments in the Asia–Pacific region require graduates with the appropriate knowledge and skills to work in these areas. This unit explores the processes and consequences of development in the Asia–Pacific region and aims to give students a perspective on working professionally within an international context by gaining communication, research, critical thinking, negotiation and decision-making skills, and an appreciation of cultural differences and approaches.

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at http://students.mq.edu.au/student_admin/enrolmentguide/academicdates/

Learning Outcomes

  1. An advanced understanding of development theory, context, practice and methods;
  2. An ability to critically reflect upon and relate development theory to empirical examples from the Asia Pacific region;
  3. A demonstrated understanding of contemporary development issues and development practice in the Asia Pacific region;
  4. An ability to research development issues and identify, assess, and synthesise complex information;
  5. An ability to communicate clearly about development issues in both oral and written formats.

General Assessment Information

Assignment submission

To successfully complete GEOP330 students must complete all assessment tasks. Failure to complete any single assessment task may result in failure of the unit. The final grade is based on the total mark accumulated from all four assessment tasks.

All students must keep a clean electronic copy of all assignments (preferably as a PDF) submitted for assessment.

For both internal and external students all assignments in ENVG330 must be submitted via Turnitin by midnight on the due date as part of the submission process, and the Turnitin receipt number recorded on the coversheet of each assignment. You will be able to access the result of the Turnitin scan and be able to review your assignments in light of this result. Not everything that Turnitin picks up as comparable to other work is plagiarised. Use this process constructively to ensure you are referencing correctly and effectively. Instructions for submitting assignment to Turnitin can be found at: http://mq.edu.au/iLearn/student_info/assignments.htm

Your assignment must be submitted with a cover sheet. Please use the barcoded coversheets which can be downloaded from the web at: http://www.arts.mq.edu.au/current_students/undergraduate/coversheet

Students must complete all the details on the cover sheet and sign the declaration regarding academic honesty that is part of the cover sheet. You must attach a copy of the email approval or medical certificates to justify any late submission.

Turnitin

Both internal and external students must submit a copy of their assignments via Turnitin – accessed via the iLearn site.  Macquarie University promotes student awareness of information management and information ethics. As well as training and the provision of general information, the University tackles the issue of academic honesty through use of an online text matching tool - Turnitin. This software is used in conjunction with a set of procedures to ensure its use is equitable. Your assessment task will automatically be compared to work of your classmates, previous students from Macquarie and other universities, with material available on the Internet, both freely available and subscription-based electronic journals. The results will be sent only to your lecturer, who will analyse these in reference to the University's standard Policy on Academic Honesty: http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/academic_honesty/policy.html.

Extensions and penalties

Extensions will be granted only in unforeseen or exceptional circumstances and only by the unit convenor. Written evidence of illness or misadventure will normally be the only grounds on which extensions will be given. Essays submitted after the due date and without extension will be penalised 10% per day or part thereof. This penalty will be applied unless you are granted an extension by the unit convenor and provide appropriate supporting documentation. Please talk to (or email) the convenor about any circumstances that affect your assignments before the due date. Late essays will not be accepted once marked essays have been returned.

Returning Assessment Tasks

Marked assignments will be returned within approximately 3 weeks of submission through Grademark in Turnitin. Feedback will include a grade range (no numerical mark), extensive in-text comments, overall comments and a detailed rubric.

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Hurdle Due
Critical Reflection Paper 20% 21/08/2017 (midnight)
Issues Brief 30% 16/10/2017 (midnight)
Class participation 10% Weeks 1-13
Exam 40% TBA

Critical Reflection Paper

Due: 21/08/2017 (midnight)
Weighting: 20%

Assessment task: The aim of this 1500 word paper is to critically engage with and reflect upon the position of major aid actors in development by linking theory to development practice. This assessment requires you to undertake research about ONE donor development agency. The paper should critically reflect upon the development ethos of the organisation and its programs, and include a specific case study example of the organisation's activities in the Asia Pacific region to illustrate your argument.

Detailed Explanation: Weeks 2 - 3 of GEOP330 will provide an overview of various theoretical frameworks that have influenced development theory and practice over time. This assignment provides an opportunity to apply this theory to the analysis of the development ethos of ONE donor development agency (see examples below). You are encouraged to include in your paper a specific case study example (e.g., project, program) from the organisation to illustrate your argument, and draw upon examples from the Asia-Pacific region.

In order to complete the assignment you should first select from the list of possible agencies given below, then research the organisation as deeply as possible, drawing on information available publicly through the organisation’s web site, as well as scholarly articles, media coverage etc. The critical reflection paper should:

  1. Analyse and explain the organisation’s approach to development through discussion of particular theories of development referred to in the unit.
  2. Consider how the organisation’s public profile reflects their approach to development.
  3. Discuss how the organisation’s programs reflect their particular development approach (such as the kinds of programs they fund, the way the funding is distributed, the requirements they place on partner agencies, etc.).
  4. Discuss how the organisation’s development ethos shapes the ways in which they represent and portray the people and regions that they work with.

Some examples of donor agencies to choose from:

  • Australian Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade - Australian Aid (formerly AusAID)
  • Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA)
  • Oxfam Australia
  • ActionAid Australia
  • World Vision
  • International Women’s Development Agency (IWDA)
  • Asian Development Bank (ADB)
  • Government of China
  • Fairtrade Australia New Zealand

This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • An advanced understanding of development theory, context, practice and methods;
  • An ability to critically reflect upon and relate development theory to empirical examples from the Asia Pacific region;
  • A demonstrated understanding of contemporary development issues and development practice in the Asia Pacific region;
  • An ability to research development issues and identify, assess, and synthesise complex information;
  • An ability to communicate clearly about development issues in both oral and written formats.

Issues Brief

Due: 16/10/2017 (midnight)
Weighting: 30%

Assessment task: The aim of this 2000-word paper is to research and critically assess a nominated Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) as a development challenge – and opportunity – in the context of one country in the Asia Pacific. The Issues Brief should be based on a review of literature covered in the unit plus independent research on the SDG challenge in the context of ONE country in the Asia Pacific region (excluding Australia, Japan and New Zealand).

The Issues Brief should clearly identify, assess and synthesise information about the SDG as it relates to a chosen country in the regional context of the Asia-Pacific. The task requires you to appraise and communicate complex issues in a critical, analytical and succinct manner.

Detailed Explanation: The aim of this assessment is to allow you to investigate a particular development challenge and opportunity confronting the Asia Pacific region in more depth in the context of ONE country within the rubric of the seventeen stated UN SDGs. A key purpose in locating the development issue within the SDGs is to consider development targets and projections, regional and global connections, and to explore the uneven and contested nature of development across scales.

The Issues Brief should address these interrelated questions: What are the challenges and opportunities associated with your nominated SDG in the context of your chosen country? How is the uneven nature of development reflected in the ways different social groups and/or parts of the country are affected by this issue? Has your chosen country’s government taken steps to integrate the SDG into national development plans and policies and what progress has been made in meeting targets? What particular practical challenges, obstacles and opportunities does this country face in the pursuit of this goal within a regional context?

The audience of the paper are development actors (such as NGOs, aid agencies, government departments, development banks, community groups or activist networks) concerned with the chosen development challenge in a particular country. Your paper should thus identify what are the key issues of concern as well as opportunities, discuss the uneven impacts associated with the SDG, and draw connections with the theory and practice of development.

Such a paper could serve the purpose of briefing a program director or team leader on the issue as part of program planning, development of an advocacy program, as part of preparation for an upcoming country visit or meeting. The paper should not focus on a case study covered in detail in the lectures.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • An advanced understanding of development theory, context, practice and methods;
  • An ability to critically reflect upon and relate development theory to empirical examples from the Asia Pacific region;
  • A demonstrated understanding of contemporary development issues and development practice in the Asia Pacific region;
  • An ability to research development issues and identify, assess, and synthesise complex information;
  • An ability to communicate clearly about development issues in both oral and written formats.

Class participation

Due: Weeks 1-13
Weighting: 10%

Both internal and external students will be given a mark for active participation throughout the course. Both are expected to participate in the first online tutorial in Week One. This will consist of a short forum introduction.

Internal students: For internally enrolled students, attendance at tutorials is compulsory. Minimum attendance is 90% (i.e., you cannot miss more than one tutorial). If you do not meet minimum attendance requirements, you will receive a zero grade.

In the first in-situ tutorial in Week 2, internal students will be asked to nominate to lead tutorial discussion on two occasions of their choosing, from Weeks 3 to 13. While presenters each week will lead the discussion with a 5-minute talk on one of the essential readings, all students are expected to actively engage and participate. Students must come to class prepared every week ready to discuss the essential readings, as you may be called upon to present any one of them to the class in any given week. Numbers permitting, each student will give a 5-minute talk twice over the semester, as well as participate in online forums.

Presenters will be expected to jointly lead class discussion on the tutorial topic, based on the issues and questions that have been raised across each of the student 5 min talks. The 5-minute talk by internal students or online posting by external students should:

  • identify the main point(s) of the reading
  • critically reflect upon issues/debates raised in the reading and relate to wider development issues
  • pose at least one question to prompt further discussion and debate
  • link the topic to a current issue in the media

For external students, it is expected that they will make at least four brief postings (150–300 words) on the unit’s iLearn website in response to the questions posted by the tutor and based on the readings, as well as respond to others’ comments each week.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • An advanced understanding of development theory, context, practice and methods;
  • An ability to critically reflect upon and relate development theory to empirical examples from the Asia Pacific region;
  • A demonstrated understanding of contemporary development issues and development practice in the Asia Pacific region;
  • An ability to communicate clearly about development issues in both oral and written formats.

Exam

Due: TBA
Weighting: 40%

Two hour exam (plus ten minutes reading time)

You are expected to present yourself for examination at the time and place designated in the University Examination Timetable. The timetable will be available in Draft form approximately eight weeks before the commencement of the examinations and in Final form approximately four weeks before the commencement of the examinations. http://students.mq.edu.au/student_admin/exams/


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • An advanced understanding of development theory, context, practice and methods;
  • An ability to critically reflect upon and relate development theory to empirical examples from the Asia Pacific region;
  • A demonstrated understanding of contemporary development issues and development practice in the Asia Pacific region;
  • An ability to communicate clearly about development issues in both oral and written formats.

Delivery and Resources

Lectures:

Internal Students: There will be one two-hour lecture session every week on Wednesdays from 1.00pm–3.00pm in W6B 325.

External Students: Lectures will be recorded using Echo-360 and can be accessed through iLearn.

Tutorials:

Internal students:  One hour tutorials will be held every week on Wednesdays at 3:00–4.00pm (W5A 201) and 4:00–5.00pm (W5A 201). Internal students are required to register for one of these two time-slots by the beginning of semester.

iLearn:

It is very important that all students are familiar with the iLearn site for GEOP330 and check it on a regular basis. Please see the unit convenor immediately if you can foresee any problems.

Required and recommended resources:

There is no required text for GEOP330; however, the required weekly tutorial readings are available through multi-search via the Library's homepage (http://www.mq.edu.au/on_campus/library/) or via the link off the unit’s iLearn site. There are several books that will be useful as general reference and background reading. The list below provides recommended general resources for the course. Macquarie University Library (MQL) call numbers are indicated in italics. These books have been either placed in Reserve or are available online by logging in to the MQL website:

  • Adams, W (2001) Green Development: environment and sustainability in the Third World 2nd ed. HC59.7.A714 2001
  • Connell, J. and Waddell, E. Eds. (2007) Environment, development and change in rural Asia-Pacific: between local and global, London, Routledge. HC460.5.Z9 E544 2007
  • Connors, M, Davison, R. and Dosch, J. (2004) The new global politics of the Asia-Pacific, New York and London, Routledge. DS35.2.C68 2004
  • Crump, T. (2007) Asia-Pacific, Hambledon Continuum, London and New York DS35.C78 2007
  • McGregor, A (2008). Southeast Asian Development, London, Routledge. MQL Available online http://www.crcnetbase.com/isbn/9780203086001 (after library log-in)
  • Rahnema, M. and Bawtree, V. (2003) The post-development reader, London, Zed Books. GN448.2.P67/1997 (1997 ed in RESERVE)
  • Sachs, W. (1992 and 2010 2nd ed) The development dictionary: a guide to knowledge as power London & New Jersey, Zed Books. HC60.D398/1992 2nd ed 2010 available online via MQL
  • Simon, D. (2006) Fifty key thinkers on development, London & New York, Routledge. HD87.55.F53 2006
  • Willis, K. (2011) Theories and Practices of Development, London & New York, Routledge. Full-text available online via MQL http://ebookcentral.proquest.com.simsrad.net.ocs.mq.edu.au/lib/mqu/detail.action?docID=668589

Unit Schedule

W

Date

Lecture Title

Lect.

Tutorials and Assessment Tasks

Module I – Introduction

1

2/8

L1 – Introduction: Development issues in the Asia-Pacific

AE

T1 – Online introduction and check-in exercise, no face-to-face class tutorial

Module II - Development Theory

2

9/8

L2 – Framing the development paradigm

Part 1: ‘Classic’ development Part 2: Alternative development

AE

T2 – Framing the development paradigm: Economic growth, modernisation and alternatives

3

16/8

L3 – New directions in development theory Part 3: Postdevelopment Part 4: Political ecology

AE

T3 – New directions in development theory: Post-structuralism and power

Module IIITheory and Practice in Context: Themes, Issues and Case Studies

4

23/8

L4 – Dragons and tigers: economic growth and development in East Asia

AE

T4 – Globalisation, inequality and livelihoods

*Assessment 1 Due Mon 21 August *

5

30/8

L5 – Urban/rural transformations, migration and mobility

AE

T5 – Urban/rural transformations, migration and mobility

6

6/9

L6 – Food security

FM

T6 – Regional food security

7

13/9

L7 – Water values, rights and privatisation

FM

T7 – Water values, rights and privatisation

BREAK 18 September – 2 October

8

4/10

L8 – Doing development research

(Panel of development professionals)

FM

T8 – Doing development: power, participation and research

Module IV – Regional Prospects and Futures

9

11/10

L9 – Rebuilding lives: vulnerability, post-crisis transformation, resilience and disasters

FM

T9 Vulnerability, disasters and post-crisis transformation

10

18/10

L10 – Climate change adaptation and development

FM

T10 – Climate change adaptation

*Assessment 2 Due Mon 16 October*

11

25/10

L11 – ‘Planet Chindia’: the rising regional and global influence of China and India

AE

T11 – Planet Chindia? Changing regional dynamics            

12

1/11

L12 – Social movements

AE

T12 – Hopeful geographies of development

Module V – Overview and Revision

13

8/11

L13 – Asian Pacific development futures – whole of unit overview and revision

AE

T13 – Rethinking development in the Anthropocene –what comes next?

EXAM PERIOD 13 November to 1 December – exam date TBA

Learning and Teaching Activities

Lectures

A series of weekly 2 hour lectures covering development theory and case studies of development theory and practice in context.

Tutorials

A series of weekly 1 hour tutorials focused on readings covering development theory and case studies of theory and practice in context as well as a series of interactive learning activities.

Online discussion

Through a series of weekly discussion questions online discussion mirroring the tutorial program will be available for all students, especially external students.

Assessment tasks

Four main assessment tasks

Policies and Procedures

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central. Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Academic Honesty Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/academic_honesty/policy.html

Assessment Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/assessment/policy_2016.html

Grade Appeal Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/gradeappeal/policy.html

Complaint Management Procedure for Students and Members of the Public http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/complaint_management/procedure.html​

Disruption to Studies Policy (in effect until Dec 4th, 2017): http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/disruption_studies/policy.html

Special Consideration Policy (in effect from Dec 4th, 2017): https://staff.mq.edu.au/work/strategy-planning-and-governance/university-policies-and-procedures/policies/special-consideration

In addition, a number of other policies can be found in the Learning and Teaching Category of Policy Central.

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/support/student_conduct/

Results

Results shown in iLearn, or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent. For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au.

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Learning Skills

Learning Skills (mq.edu.au/learningskills) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to improve your marks and take control of your study.

Student Enquiry Service

For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at ask.mq.edu.au

Equity Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

IT Help

For help with University computer systems and technology, visit http://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/information_technology/help/

When using the University's IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use of IT Resources Policy. The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network including students.

Graduate Capabilities

Discipline Specific Knowledge and Skills

Our graduates will take with them the intellectual development, depth and breadth of knowledge, scholarly understanding, and specific subject content in their chosen fields to make them competent and confident in their subject or profession. They will be able to demonstrate, where relevant, professional technical competence and meet professional standards. They will be able to articulate the structure of knowledge of their discipline, be able to adapt discipline-specific knowledge to novel situations, and be able to contribute from their discipline to inter-disciplinary solutions to problems.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • An advanced understanding of development theory, context, practice and methods;
  • An ability to critically reflect upon and relate development theory to empirical examples from the Asia Pacific region;
  • A demonstrated understanding of contemporary development issues and development practice in the Asia Pacific region;
  • An ability to research development issues and identify, assess, and synthesise complex information;
  • An ability to communicate clearly about development issues in both oral and written formats.

Assessment tasks

  • Critical Reflection Paper
  • Issues Brief
  • Class participation
  • Exam

Critical, Analytical and Integrative Thinking

We want our graduates to be capable of reasoning, questioning and analysing, and to integrate and synthesise learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments; to be able to critique constraints, assumptions and limitations; to be able to think independently and systemically in relation to scholarly activity, in the workplace, and in the world. We want them to have a level of scientific and information technology literacy.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • An advanced understanding of development theory, context, practice and methods;
  • An ability to critically reflect upon and relate development theory to empirical examples from the Asia Pacific region;
  • A demonstrated understanding of contemporary development issues and development practice in the Asia Pacific region;
  • An ability to research development issues and identify, assess, and synthesise complex information;
  • An ability to communicate clearly about development issues in both oral and written formats.

Assessment tasks

  • Critical Reflection Paper
  • Issues Brief
  • Class participation
  • Exam

Problem Solving and Research Capability

Our graduates should be capable of researching; of analysing, and interpreting and assessing data and information in various forms; of drawing connections across fields of knowledge; and they should be able to relate their knowledge to complex situations at work or in the world, in order to diagnose and solve problems. We want them to have the confidence to take the initiative in doing so, within an awareness of their own limitations.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • A demonstrated understanding of contemporary development issues and development practice in the Asia Pacific region;
  • An ability to research development issues and identify, assess, and synthesise complex information;

Assessment tasks

  • Critical Reflection Paper
  • Issues Brief
  • Class participation
  • Exam

Creative and Innovative

Our graduates will also be capable of creative thinking and of creating knowledge. They will be imaginative and open to experience and capable of innovation at work and in the community. We want them to be engaged in applying their critical, creative thinking.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • A demonstrated understanding of contemporary development issues and development practice in the Asia Pacific region;
  • An ability to research development issues and identify, assess, and synthesise complex information;
  • An ability to communicate clearly about development issues in both oral and written formats.

Assessment tasks

  • Critical Reflection Paper
  • Issues Brief
  • Class participation

Effective Communication

We want to develop in our students the ability to communicate and convey their views in forms effective with different audiences. We want our graduates to take with them the capability to read, listen, question, gather and evaluate information resources in a variety of formats, assess, write clearly, speak effectively, and to use visual communication and communication technologies as appropriate.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • A demonstrated understanding of contemporary development issues and development practice in the Asia Pacific region;
  • An ability to research development issues and identify, assess, and synthesise complex information;
  • An ability to communicate clearly about development issues in both oral and written formats.

Assessment tasks

  • Critical Reflection Paper
  • Issues Brief
  • Class participation
  • Exam

Engaged and Ethical Local and Global citizens

As local citizens our graduates will be aware of indigenous perspectives and of the nation's historical context. They will be engaged with the challenges of contemporary society and with knowledge and ideas. We want our graduates to have respect for diversity, to be open-minded, sensitive to others and inclusive, and to be open to other cultures and perspectives: they should have a level of cultural literacy. Our graduates should be aware of disadvantage and social justice, and be willing to participate to help create a wiser and better society.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • An advanced understanding of development theory, context, practice and methods;
  • An ability to critically reflect upon and relate development theory to empirical examples from the Asia Pacific region;
  • A demonstrated understanding of contemporary development issues and development practice in the Asia Pacific region;
  • An ability to communicate clearly about development issues in both oral and written formats.

Assessment tasks

  • Critical Reflection Paper
  • Issues Brief
  • Class participation

Socially and Environmentally Active and Responsible

We want our graduates to be aware of and have respect for self and others; to be able to work with others as a leader and a team player; to have a sense of connectedness with others and country; and to have a sense of mutual obligation. Our graduates should be informed and active participants in moving society towards sustainability.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • An advanced understanding of development theory, context, practice and methods;
  • An ability to critically reflect upon and relate development theory to empirical examples from the Asia Pacific region;
  • A demonstrated understanding of contemporary development issues and development practice in the Asia Pacific region;

Assessment tasks

  • Issues Brief
  • Class participation

Capable of Professional and Personal Judgement and Initiative

We want our graduates to have emotional intelligence and sound interpersonal skills and to demonstrate discernment and common sense in their professional and personal judgement. They will exercise initiative as needed. They will be capable of risk assessment, and be able to handle ambiguity and complexity, enabling them to be adaptable in diverse and changing environments.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • A demonstrated understanding of contemporary development issues and development practice in the Asia Pacific region;
  • An ability to research development issues and identify, assess, and synthesise complex information;

Assessment tasks

  • Class participation
  • Exam

Commitment to Continuous Learning

Our graduates will have enquiring minds and a literate curiosity which will lead them to pursue knowledge for its own sake. They will continue to pursue learning in their careers and as they participate in the world. They will be capable of reflecting on their experiences and relationships with others and the environment, learning from them, and growing - personally, professionally and socially.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • A demonstrated understanding of contemporary development issues and development practice in the Asia Pacific region;
  • An ability to research development issues and identify, assess, and synthesise complex information;

Assessment tasks

  • Issues Brief
  • Class participation

Changes from Previous Offering

A number of changes were made to the unit in 2017 by the current convenor and lecturer, who have both taught into and convened the unit in past years respectively.

  • Structure: The unit is structured into three substantive modules as well as an introductory and review module.
  • Content: A number of new lecture topics readings have been added as well as new readings. These new topics reflect an updated emphasis on the development prospects for the region as well as gains and challenges faced, and greater influence wielded by, China and India.
  • Assessment: The weighting of the first and second assessment task have been modified to give more emphasis to an application of research skills to current issues (the Sustainable Development Goals) in the second written assessment, allowing students to build on their first written assessment which now has a slightly reduced weighting. 
  • Delivery: The tutorial program will include a number of updated interactive and practice-oriented learning activities, including use of the ECHO 360 Active Learning Platform in both lectures and tutorials.