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INED804 – Global Indigenous Education

2017 – S1 External

General Information

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Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff Lecturer
Danielle Montgomery
Contact via danielle.montgomery@mq.edu.au
Level 4, W3A room 409
By appointment please email to arrange
Bronwyn Carlson
Credit points Credit points
4
Prerequisites Prerequisites
Admission to MIndigenousEd or GradDipIndigenousEd or GradCertIndigenousEd
Corequisites Corequisites
Co-badged status Co-badged status
Unit description Unit description
Education issues that influence Indigenous people in Australia, New Zealand and the United States are examined in this unit. Students will gain a solid understanding of the education similarities and differences that Indigenous communities around the globe face. This unit challenges students to analyse ways that legislation has shaped the education of such communities from a historical and contemporary context.

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at http://students.mq.edu.au/student_admin/enrolmentguide/academicdates/

Learning Outcomes

  1. Critically examine the Declaration of Human Rights and develop a solid understanding of its impact on Indigenous people throughout the world
  2. Develop a strong theoretical basis to understand historical injustices Indigenous people throughout the world have faced and the impact this has had on their education
  3. Evaluate the impact language has had on education opportunities of Indigenous people throughout the world
  4. Examine how the Treaty of Waitangi has influenced education outcomes of Māori people in Aotearoa, New Zealand
  5. Demonstrate advanced knowledge of education issues that relate to minority groups in the United States of America
  6. Critically compare the education experiences of Indigenous Australians to those of other First Nation People and demonstrate the ability to communicate them to others
  7. Critically engage with the perspectives of other students using the prescribed online technology (i.e. iLearn)

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Hurdle Due
Regular Online Activity 30% Regularly
Digital Storytelling Piece 30% Sunday, 16 April 2017
Research Essay 40% Sunday, 28th May 2017

Regular Online Activity

Due: Regularly
Weighting: 30%

Students are required to provide a response of approximately 250 words to the weekly online activity. There are 13 weeks in the semester and each week will be given a mark out of 10. The best 10 weeks will then be added together to give you a total mark out of 100. This will then be reduced to a percentage of 30% which will contribute to your final grade.

Late submissions require disruption to study approval

 

Weekly Topics and Weekly Assessment Questions

Week

Due Date

Topic / Activity

1

23rd April 2017

Examining the United Nations Declaration of Human Rights of Indigenous Peoples

Familiarise yourself with iLearn site. Post a brief introduction about yourself. Begin by telling us about yourself (including your ancestry if you wish), what you do and where you do it. Please also share with us what you wanted to be or do with your life when you were growing up. Reflect on, and share how, this coursework (and any other courses you are completing) relates to your personal and/or professional aspirations.

If you have not already done so, please upload a digital image of yourself in the image upload section of your iLearn profile as well as update your iLearn profile (use the Tools box located on the left side of the page to update your iLearn profile).

While we cannot see each other in person these images are helpful in establishing a vibrant online learning community.

2

23rd April 2017

Māori Education in New Zealand

Provide an overview of the evolution and components of the Treaty of Waitangi.

3

23rd April 2017

The Native American (American Indian) Experience: Pre-Colonization and the Invasion

Provide a summary of Newcomb's ideas about Cognitive theory and how it relates to federal Indian law.

4

23rd April 2017

The Difference and Similarities between Indigenous educational experiences in Australia, New Zealand and the United States of America

Discuss either the most striking similarity or difference between the educational histories of the Indigenous people based in Australia, New Zealand and the United States of America.

5

23rd April 2017

Cultural Relativism vs. Universal Human Rights

Should Dreamtime be included in the science curriculum? Using the information you have read this week explain the pros and cons of including this topic in an educational curriculum.

6

23rd April 2017

Citizenship Education: A Global Perspective on Assimilation and Multiculturalism

Define in your own words each of these terms and explain how they differ from each other: assimilation, melting pot, differentialism, multiculturalism and pluralism.

7

23rd April 2017

An overview of Global Citizenship Education

Based on the readings and lecture materials, provide and elaborate on 5 characteristics of a global citizen.

8

16th July 2017

Bilingualism, Multilingualism and the Preservation of Dying Languages

Describe some of the challenges and benefits of creating a bilingual education program for Indigenous peoples.

9

16th July 2017

Indigenous Canadian American Resistance and Reconciliation

Based on the weekly readings what are some of the concerns of First Peoples (in Canada) in their efforts towards self-determination?

10

16th July 2017

Native American Resistance and Reconciliation

What are Pewewardy and Hammer’s recommendations for culturally responsive teaching for American Indian students? Which ones overlap with TribCrit?

11

16th July 2017

Intersecting Discourses: Closing the Gaps, Social Justice and the Treaty of Waitangi

Describe how the education of the Maori people was impacted by the Treaty of Waitangi.

12

16th July 2017

Indigenous People, Internet Communication Technologies and Popular Culture

Describe some of the concerns and benefits of using ICTs to archive Indigenous language and culture.

13

16th July 2017

Based on the lectures and discussions in the course, explain how you define what it means to be a global Indigenous citizen. Use the information in the provided in the previous lessons to justify your definition.

Assignment 1 Marking Criteria

  • It is imperative that the response be provided by to the Sunday of each week.

  • Demonstrates a clear understanding of topic.

  • Evidence that student has read the related materials.

  • Structure of response (i.e. a clear introduction, body and conclusion).

  • Presentation (i.e. grammar and formatting).

  • Make(s) (a) compelling point(s) supported by academic sources. Referencing in this activity is appropriate. When you reference in text, make sure you have a reference list at the bottom. The reference list will not be included in your word count for this activity.

  • Restrict your responses to around 250 words (applying a 10% flexibility rule this means that responses can be between 225-275 words). Marks will be deducted for fewer or more words than this.

  • Feedback will be provided at the end of semester along with a final grade for this assessment piece. You will receive a grade each week but will not receive feedback on a weekly basis unless you attempt a weekly question and do not achieve a pass grade.

  • You will be able to see what the other students post for their responses only after you have posted your own response. This is to enhance student engagement and learning while ensuring a fair process for all.

     


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Critically examine the Declaration of Human Rights and develop a solid understanding of its impact on Indigenous people throughout the world
  • Develop a strong theoretical basis to understand historical injustices Indigenous people throughout the world have faced and the impact this has had on their education
  • Evaluate the impact language has had on education opportunities of Indigenous people throughout the world
  • Examine how the Treaty of Waitangi has influenced education outcomes of Māori people in Aotearoa, New Zealand
  • Demonstrate advanced knowledge of education issues that relate to minority groups in the United States of America
  • Critically compare the education experiences of Indigenous Australians to those of other First Nation People and demonstrate the ability to communicate them to others
  • Critically engage with the perspectives of other students using the prescribed online technology (i.e. iLearn)

Digital Storytelling Piece

Due: Sunday, 16 April 2017
Weighting: 30%

Assignment 2: Digital Storytelling Piece

Rosemary van den Berg, a Nyoongar Elder of the south-west people in Western Australia, notes:

‘Aboriginal culture is an oral culture and for forty thousand years or more, it has been passed down from generation to generation. Traditionally Aboriginal story telling had many functions, and it still does. It reinforced the Aboriginal people’s ideological beliefs in the Dreamtime – the Creation and other cultural stories of the Rainbow Serpent and their environment … Aboriginal story telling gave information of where the best game and water sources were to be found; where people could venture and where they weren’t permitted to go, such places as sacred sites and where men’s and women’s businesses were conducted that was off-limits to the uninitiated. So storytelling was a learning process – children learnt from an early age how to survive their environment by listening to their elders. Aboriginal Elders, the Holders of their Culture, or Keepers of the Stories both men and women, passed their knowledge on to the younger generations and because Aboriginal cultures were oral cultures, retaining what they learned was just as important as the learning process. With no written material to refer to, Aborigines relied on memory to store all the information they gathered. Through learning and retaining what they learned through memory, they became expert in surviving their diverse environments… Over the last few decades, Aboriginal people have found a new ‘voice’ for keeping their stories alive and that is through literature: printed storytelling.’

Van den Berg, R 2005, ‘Aboriginal storytelling and writing’, Australian Public Intellectual Network, p.2011.

This assignment affords you the opportunity to engage in 21st century storytelling.

What is a Digital Story? From 7 Things You Should Know About Digital Storytelling Digital storytelling is the practice of combining narrative with digital content, including images, sound, and video to create a short movie, typically with a strong emotional component. Sophisticated digital stories can be interactive movies that include highly produced audio and visual effects, but a set of slides with corresponding narration or music constitutes a basic digital story. Digital stories can be instructional, persuasive, historical, or reflective. The resources available to incorporate into a digital story are virtually limitless, giving the storyteller enormous creative latitude. Some learning theorists believe that as a pedagogical technique, storytelling can be effectively applied to nearly any subject. Constructing a narrative and communicating it effectively require the storyteller to think carefully about the topic and consider the audience’s perspective. Digital storytelling is grounded in creativity. It is a digital literacy that blends images, text, first- person narration, and music.

Purpose: The purpose of this assignment is for you to create your own digital story for the purposes of reflecting on topics related to global Indigenous education. The reason for this assignment is two-fold. When we explore the experiences of Indigenous people and internet communications technology, we will see there are several arguments made for the importance of digital literacy among Indigenous people. Additionally, we will learn in Week 10, the importance of incorporating narratives into educational practices.

Directions:

  • Read Chapter 1 of: Archibald, J 2008 Indigenous Storywork: Educating the Heart, Mind, Body, and Spirit, UBC Press, Vancouver (in Week 5 readings). 
  • Create a digital story that explores one of the following topics:
    • cultural relativism, universalism, assimilation or multiculturalism by focussing on Indigenous peoples from Australia, New Zealand, Canada or the United States of America;
    • the relevance of the Declaration of Human Rights and/or the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples on Indigenous peoples education in Australia, New Zealand, Canada or the United States of America;     
    • how an Indigenous practice has been acculturated by (or appropriated) and practiced by non-Indigenous communities;
    • the educational significance of the Treaty of Waitangi; or
    • choose your own topic and submit this topic for approval to the Unit Convenor prior to the end of week 4 (26 March 2017) of semester.
  •  There are a few ways you can present this digital story:

What to include in your digital story: 

  • A title and your name 
  • 30-45 photographs or 5-8 minutes of video content
  • Voice narration that explains and narrates the images in a story format (i.e. a beginning introduction, a middle, an ending conclusion)
  • Important:  As you create your digital story be sure to check, listen to, and edit your narration volume. I recommend narrating and previewing a couple of test slides to be sure the narration is at a consistently loud volume. This is especially true if you are going to use the computer's built-in microphone. You want to speak clearly and at a ‘conversation with friends in a crowded coffee shop’ volume level. This does not mean you have to shout, but your volume should be loud enough to consistently hear your voice over any background music. Loud narration is preferable to soft narration keeping in mind if your marker cannot hear the story it cannot be marked.
  • Include appropriate acknowledgements for all images, videos, text, music etc (a small text box is sufficient in each instance and/or a reference page at the end of the presentation) 
  • Music (optional but recommended) 

 

 

 

 

Digital Storytelling Rubric

             

Category 

Advanced/Proficient

Competent

Functional  

Developing 

   

Purpose of Story 

Establishes a purpose early on and maintains a clear focus throughout. 

Establishes a purpose early on and maintains focus for most of the presentation. 

There are a few lapses in focus, but the purpose is fairly clear. 

It is difficult to figure out the purpose of the presentation.           

   

Point of View 

The point of view is well developed and contributes to the overall meaning of the story. 

 

The point of view is stated but does not connect with each part of the story, although an attempt is made to connect it to the overall meaning of the story. 

The point of view is stated but no attempt is made to connect it to the overall meaning of the story. 

The point of view is only hinted at, or is difficult to discern. 

   

Choice of Content 

Contents create a distinct atmosphere or tone that matches different parts of the story. The images may communicate symbolism and/or metaphors. Provides documentation for claims.

 

Contents create an atmosphere or tone that matches some parts of the story. The images may communicate symbolism and/or metaphors. Provides some documentation for claims

An attempt was made to use contents to create an atmosphere/tone but it needed more work. Image choice is logical. 

Little or no attempt to use contents to create an appropriate atmosphere/tone. 

   

Clarity of Voice 

Voice quality is clear and consistently audible throughout the presentation. 

 

Voice quality is clear and consistently audible throughout the majority (85-95%) of the presentation. 

Voice quality is clear and consistently audible through some (70-84%)of the presentation. 

Voice quality needs more attention. 

   

Pacing of Narrative 

The pace (rhythm and voice punctuation) fits the story line and helps the audience really "get into" the story. 

Occasionally speaks too fast or too slowly for the story line. The pacing (rhythm and voice punctuation) is relatively engaging for the audience. 

Tries to use pacing (rhythm and voice punctuation), but it is often noticeable that the pacing does not fit the story line. Audience is not consistently engaged. 

No attempt to match the pace of the storytelling to the story line or the audience. 

   

Quality of Images 

Images create a distinct atmosphere or tone that matches different parts of the story. The images may communicate symbolism and/or metaphors. 

 

Images create an atmosphere or tone that matches some parts of the story. The images may communicate symbolism and/or metaphors. 

An attempt was made to use images to create an atmosphere/tone but it needed more work. Image choice is logical. 

Little or no attempt to use images to create an appropriate atmosphere/tone. 

   

Economy of Story Detail 

 

The story is told with exactly the right amount of detail throughout. It does not seem too short - at least 5 minutes- nor does it seem too long - no longer than 8 minutes.

 

The story composition is typically good, though it seems to drag somewhat OR need slightly more detail in one or two sections.

 

The story seems to need more editing. It is noticeably too long or too short in more than one section. 

The story needs extensive editing. It is too long or too short to be interesting. 

   

Grammar and Language Usage 

Grammar and usage were correct (for the dialect chosen) and contributed to clarity, style and character development. 

 

Grammar and usage were typically correct (for the dialect chosen) and errors did not detract from the story. 

Grammar and usage were typically correct but errors detracted from story 

Repeated errors in grammar and usage distracted greatly from the story.

   

Organization

Clear introduction, body, and conclusion. Story flows in a logical manner 

 

Introduction, body, and conclusion. Story flows in a somewhat logical manner 

Introduction, body, and conclusion. Story flow does not flow in a logical manner 

No introduction, body, and conclusion.. Little or no clear flow to the 

   

Late submissions require approval through the disruption to study process


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Critically examine the Declaration of Human Rights and develop a solid understanding of its impact on Indigenous people throughout the world
  • Develop a strong theoretical basis to understand historical injustices Indigenous people throughout the world have faced and the impact this has had on their education
  • Evaluate the impact language has had on education opportunities of Indigenous people throughout the world
  • Examine how the Treaty of Waitangi has influenced education outcomes of Māori people in Aotearoa, New Zealand
  • Demonstrate advanced knowledge of education issues that relate to minority groups in the United States of America

Research Essay

Due: Sunday, 28th May 2017
Weighting: 40%

 

Assignment 3: Research Paper—4,000 words 

Write a 4,000 word research paper answering one of the following four questions:

  • Examine the educational context, language preservation efforts and self-determination efforts that have been/are being undertaken in Australia, Canada, New Zealand or the United States of America (choose one country only). On the basis of this examination develop a set of recommendations for how Government can advance Indigenous peoples right to education in accordance with international human rights standards (e.g. the Declaration on Human Rights, the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples).

 

  • Drawing primarily on Indigenous peoples perspectives examine and evaluate the impact of education related legislation and/or policies on Indigenous peoples in Australia, Canada, New Zealand or the United States of America (choose one country only). Your response may consider historical or contemporary legislation and/or policies, or a mix of both. Include an analysis of the socio-political underpinnings of these legislative and policy measures.   

 

  • Evaluate how multiculturalism and global citizenship education could be considered as ‘two sides of the same coin’.  How do these concepts interact with the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous People? What parallels and contradictions exist?

 

  • Based on the lessons from class, please describe three specific barriers to preserving "dying languages".  Also, based on your own research, please describe three specific interventions that are currently being used to preserve dying languages. This can include computer programs, games or websites. Provide information on any results of the intervention that are available as well as your ideas (based on the documentation you have provided). 

Use Times or Times New Roman 12 point font. Include reference to at least 7 scholarly sources (i.e. academic sources such as journal articles or academic books). Government reports, non-government agency reports and newspaper articles for example are secondary sources and are not considered scholarly sources. Secondary sources may be used to support your arguments however, academic sources must be used as the primary basis for your arguments.  

 

Rubric for choices listed above

 

Advanced

Proficient

Competent

Functional

Developing

Thesis

There is a clearly defined thesis presented in the introduction of the paper

There is a clearly defined thesis presented in the paper

The thesis is not fully developed

Poorly defined thesis

Not applicable

Content

Concrete, relevant details support the  thesis throughout the paper. The information presented is relevant, appropriate in scope, and demonstrates a complex understanding of the topic 

Content support is present but not perfected.

Content support is present but scope is too broad or too narrow

General information provided, supports are not specific

Not applicable

Organization-Structural Development of the Idea 

Writer demonstrates logical and subtle sequencing of ideas through well-developed paragraphs; transitions are used to enhance organization. 

Paragraph development present but not perfected. 

Logical organization; organization of ideas not fully developed. 

No evidence of structure or organization. 

Not applicable

Conclusion 

The conclusion is engaging and restates the thesis. 

The conclusion restates the thesis. 

The conclusion does not adequately restate the thesis. 

Incomplete and/or unfocused. 

Absent 

Mechanics 

No errors in punctuation, capitalization and spelling. 

Almost no errors in punctuation, capitalization and spelling. 

Many errors in punctuation, capitalization and spelling. 

Numerous and distracting errors in punctuation, capitalization and spelling. 

Not applicable

Usage 

No errors sentence structure and word usage. 

Almost no errors in sentence structure and word usage. 

Many errors in sentence structure and word usage. 

Numerous and distracting errors in sentence structure and word usage. 

Not applicable

Citation 

All cited works, both text and visual, are done in the correct format with no errors. 

Some cited works, both text and visual, are done in the correct format. Inconsistencies evident. 

Few cited works, both text and visual, are done in the correct format. 

Absent 

Not applicable

Bibliography

Done in the correct format with no errors. Includes more than 7 major references (e.g. academic journal articles, books, but no more than two internet sites. Periodicals available on-line are not considered internet sites.)

Done in the correct format with few errors. . Includes 7 major references (e.g. academic journal articles, books, but no more than two internet sites. Periodicals available on-line are not considered internet sites.)

Done in the correct format with some errors. Includes 5 major references (e.g. academic journal articles, books, but no more than two internet sites. Periodicals available on-line are not considered internet sites.)

Done in the correct format with many errors. Includes 3 major references (e.g. academic journal articles, books, but no more than two internet sites. Periodicals available on-line are not considered internet sites.)

Absent or the only sites are internet sites.

OR instead of answering one of the four questions above:

Provide a summary and critique of four journal articles published in academic journals between 2012 and 2017 dealing with any of the Global Indigenous Education topics addressed in this course. Each article should address one of the following locations with no duplication of locations: New Zealand, the United States, Canada and Australia. Explain the implications the article has for Indigenous education, as well as Indigenous languages, multiculturalism, and/or Reconciliation. Your critique should include some basic information:

1. Name(s) of the author(s)

2. Title of article

3. Title of journal, volume number, date, month and page numbers

4. Include a link to the article reviewed

5. The author’s purpose, approach or methods, hypothesis, and major conclusions.

The bulk of your critique, however, should consist of your qualified opinion (supported with academic references) of the article. Read the article you are to critique once to get an overview. Then read it again, critically.  At this point you may want to make some notes to yourself that allow you to address the following:

1. Is the title of the article appropriate and clear?

2. Is the abstract specific, representative of the article, and in the correct form?

3. What is the purpose of the article?

4. What are the main claims the article makes?

5. What is the relationship between evidence and claims?

6. What is the rhetorical effectiveness of the article—logical, ethical, political, pedagogical, and aesthetic?

Late submissions require approval through the disruption to study process.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Critically examine the Declaration of Human Rights and develop a solid understanding of its impact on Indigenous people throughout the world
  • Develop a strong theoretical basis to understand historical injustices Indigenous people throughout the world have faced and the impact this has had on their education
  • Evaluate the impact language has had on education opportunities of Indigenous people throughout the world
  • Examine how the Treaty of Waitangi has influenced education outcomes of Māori people in Aotearoa, New Zealand
  • Demonstrate advanced knowledge of education issues that relate to minority groups in the United States of America
  • Critically compare the education experiences of Indigenous Australians to those of other First Nation People and demonstrate the ability to communicate them to others

Delivery and Resources

This unit is delivered externally. There are no on-campus sessions.

Reference list:

Week 1 – Required Readings

The United Nations 2008, The Universal Declaration of Human Rights,  The United Nations, Geneva, viewed September 2011, http://www.un.org/events/humanrights/udhr60/hrphotos/declaration%20_eng.pdf

The United Nations 2007, The Declaration of Rights for Indigenous Peoples, The United Nations, Geneva, viewed September 2011, http://www.un.org/esa/socdev/unpfii/en/drip.html

Week 1 - Optional Readings

May, S & Aikman, S 2003, ‘Indigenous Education: Addressing Current Issues and Developments’ Comparative Education, vol. 39, no. 2, May, pp. 139-145

Week 2:

Week 3 – Required Readings

The United States Senate Subcommittee on Indian Education 1969, Part I – A National Tragedy: Subcommittee Findings , The United States Senate, viewed September 2011, http://www.tedna.org/pubs/Kennedy/toc.htm

Ellis, H C, 1987, ‘From the Battle in the Classroom to the Battle for the Classroom’ American Indian Quarterly, vol. 11, no. 3 Summer, pp. 255-264

Lomawaima, KT, 1993, They Called it Prairie Light: The Story of the Chilocco Indian School, The University of Nebraska Press, Lincoln.

Newcomb, S. T. (2008). Pagans in the Promised Land: Decoding the Doctrine of Christian Discovery. Golden, CO: Fulcrum.

Hill, J. S., Lau, M. Y., & Sue, D. W. (2010). Integrating trauma psychology and cultural psychology: Indigenous perspectives on theory, research, and practice. Traumatology16(4), 39-47.

Week 4 – Required Readings

Cole, W., & ebrary, I. (2011). Uncommon schools: The global rise of postsecondary institutions for indigenous peoples. Stanford, Calif.: Stanford University Press.

Cornell, S. 2006, Indigenous Peoples, Poverty and Self-Determination in Australia, New Zealand, Canada and the United States,  The Native Nations Institute for Leadership, Management, and Policy (NNI), Tucson, and The Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development (Harvard Project), Cambridge, Viewed  September 2011, http://www.jopna.net/pubs/jopna%202006_02_coverandinside.pdf

Week 4 - Optional Readings

Smith, A 2009, Indigenous Peoples and Boarding Schools: A Comparative Study, The United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues. September 2011, http://www.un.org/esa/socdev/unpfii/documents/E_C_19_2009_crp1.pdf

Welch, AR 2006, ‘Aboriginal Education as Internal Colonialism: The Schooling of an Indigenous Minority in Australia’ Comparative Education, Vol. 24, No. 2, pp. 203-215

Week 5 – Required Readings

Archibald, J 2008 Indigenous Storywork: Educating the Heart, Mind, Body, and Spirit, UBC Press, Vancouver (read Chapter 1).

Little Bear, L. (2000). Jagged worldviews colliding. In M. Battiste (Ed.), Reclaiming Indigenous voice and vision. Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press.

Little Bear, L., (2009). Naturalizing Indigenous Knowledge, Synthesis Paper. (ISBN: 978-1-

926612-32-4) University of Saskatchewan, Aboriginal Education Research Centre, Saskatoon, Sask. and First Nations and Adult Higher Education Consortium, Calgary, Alta.Retrieved 13/01/2014 from  www.ccl-cca.ca.

Donnelly, J  1984, ‘Cultural Relativism and Universal Human Rights’ Human Rights Quarterly, vol. 6, no.4, Nov, pp. 400-419

Pewewardy, C 2002,’ Learning Styles of American Indian/Alaskan Native Students: A Review of the Literature and Implications for Practice’ Journal of American Indian Education, vol. 41, no. 3,

Week 5 – Optional Readings

Bowen, JR 2000, ‘Should We Have a Universal Concept of 'Indigenous Peoples' Rights'?: Ethnicity and Essentialism in the Twenty-First Century’ Anthropology Today, vol. 16, no. 4, August, pp. 12-16

Gibson, MA 1976, ‘Approaches to Multicultural Education in the United States: Some Concepts and Assumptions’ Anthropology and Education Quarterly, vol 7,  no. 4, November , pp. 7-18.

Lewis, BF & Aikenhead, GS 2000, Introduction: Shifting Perspectives from Universalism to Cross-Culturalism

Semali  L M & J L Kincheloe,  L M.1999, ‘Introduction: What is Indigenous Knowledge and Why Should We Study it?’ in LM  Semali &  J L Kincheloe (eds ) What Is Indigenous Knowledge? : Voices from the Academy, Garland Science Publishing,  London

Tsolidis, G 2008, ‘Australian Multicultural Education: Revisiting and Resuscitating’ in G. Wan (ed.), The Education of Diverse Student Populations: A Global Perspective.

Week 6 – Required Readings

May, S 2002, ‘Accommodating Multiculturalism and Biculturalism in Aotearoa New Zealand: Implications for Language Education’ Waikato Journal of Education vol 8 pp. 5-26

Richardson, T. A. (2012). Indigenous Political Difference, Colonial Perspectives and the Challenge of Diplomatic Relations: Toward a Decolonial Diplomacy in Multicultural Educational Theory. Educational Studies48(5), 465-484.

St. Denis, V. (2011). Silencing Aboriginal curricular content and perspectives through multiculturalism:“There are other children here”. Review of Education, Pedagogy, and Cultural Studies33(4), 306-317.

Week 6 – Optional Readings

Good, A 2009, ‘Framing American Indians as the “First Americans”: Using Critical Multiculturalism to  Trouble the Normative American Story’ Social Studies Research and Practice, vol 4, no.2, July, pp. 49-66.

Week 7 – Required Readings

Shultz, L 2007, ‘Educating for Global Citizenship: Conflicting Agenda and Understandings’ The Alberta Journal of Educational Research, vol. 53, no 3, Fall, p 248

Lam, WSE 2006, ‘Culture and Learning in the Context of Globalization:  Research Directions’ American Educational Research Association Review of Research in Education, Washington DC, viewed October, 2011, http://rre.sagepub.com/content/30/1/213

Townsend-Cross, M. (2011) Global Citizenship : No Guarantees: oppressed knowledges and privileged learners. In Townsend-Cross, M., & BA, S. (2011). Global Citizenship–No Guarantees: oppressed knowledges and privileged learners. Global Vision, Local Action: Education for Sustainable Development and Global Citizenship, 97.

Writer, J. H. (2010). Broadening the Meaning of Citizenship Education: Native Americans and Tribal Nationhood. Action in Teacher Education32(2), 70-81.

Week 7– Optional Readings

McLaren P, & Farahmandpur R, 2001, ‘Teaching Against Globalization and the New Imperialism: Toward a Revolutionary Pedagogy’, American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education, Washington DC, viewed on October, 2011, http://jte.sagepub.com/content/52/2/136

Olneck, M R, 1993, ‘Terms of Inclusion: Has Multiculturalism Redefined Equality in American Education?’ American Journal of Education, Vol. 101, No. 3 May, pp. 234-260

Week 8 – Required Readings

Montgomery-Anderson, 2008 ‘A Model for Indigenous Language Revival’ Indigenous Nations Journal, Vol. 6, No. 1, Spring p. 23 – 44

May, S, 2005 ‘Language Rights: Moving the Debate Forward’, Journal of Sociolinguistics vol 9 no 3, pp, 319-347

McCarty, TL, 2008, ‘Language Education Planning and Policies by and for Indigenous Peoples’ in S. May and N. H. Hornberger (eds), Encyclopedia of Language and Education, 2nd Edition, Volume 1: Language Policy and Political Issues in Education, 137–150. Springer Science + Business Media LLC.

Simpson, J. Caffery, J, & McConvell, P 2009, Gaps in Australia’s Indigenous Language Policy: Dismantling bilingual education in the Northern Territory, Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies, Canberra, viewed on October, 2011, <www.aiatsis.gov.au/research_program/publications/discussion_papers>

Week 9 – Required Readings

Maina, F, 1991,  ‘Cultural Relevant Pedagogy: First Nations Education in Canada’, The Canadian Journal of Native Studies vol 17, no2, pp, 293-314.

Atelo, S. 2011, ‘Pursuing First Nation Self-Determination: Realizing Our Rights And Responsibilities’, Assembly of First Nations, viewed on October, 2011, http://www.afn.ca/uploads/files/aga/pursuing_self-determination_aga_2011_eng[1].pdf

Alia, V. (2010). Chapter 3: Lessons From Canada: Amplifying Indigenous Voice: In The new media nation: Indigenous peoples and global communication (Vol. 2). Berghahn Books.

Week 9 – Optional Readings

Mendelson, M, 2006, ‘Aboriginal Peoples and Postsecondary Education in Canada’, The Caledon Institute of Social Policy, viewed on October 2011, www.caledoninst.org/Publications/PDF/595ENG.pdf

Week 10 – Required Readings

Brayboy, B., 2005. ‘Toward a Tribal Critical Race Theory in Education’, The Urban Review, Vol. 37, No. 5, pp, 425-434.

Pewewardy, C, and Hammer, P.C. 2003,  ‘Culturally Responsive Teaching for American Indian Students’, Charleston WV ERIC Clearinghouse on Rural Education and Small Schools, viewed on October 2011.

Tatum, B. D. 1999,’Beyond Black and White: What Do We Mean When We Say Indian?’ in B.D. Tatum,  "Why are all the Black kids sitting together in the cafeteria?": and other conversations about race. New York: BasicBooks

Week 11 – Required Readings

Hook, G R. 2006 A future for Maori education Part I: The dissociation of culture and education. Mai Review, 1(2), pp.1-14. Retrieved from http://www.review.mai.ac.nz/index.php/MR/article/view/8/197

Lourie, M., 2016. Biculturalism in education: Haere whakamua, hoki whakamuri/Going forward, thinking back. New Zealand Journal of Teachers' Work, 12(2), pp.131-148. Retrieved from https://teachworkojs.aut.ac.nz/autojs/index.php/nzjtw/article/view/33

Week 12 – Required Readings

Boyle, A. & Wallace, R. (2011). Indigenous People and E-nabling Technologies: An Analysis of Recent Experiences in Northern and Central Australia. Kulumun. Journal of the Wollotuka Institute, 1(1), 1-14. Retrieved from https://novaojs.newcastle.edu.au/ojs/index.php/kulumun/article/view/53/39

Johnson, G. M. & Oliver, R. (2013). Cognition, Literacy and Mobile  Technology: A Conceptual Model of the Benefits of Smartphones for Aboriginal Students in Remote Communities. EdMedia 2013, Victoria, British Columbia. Retrieved from http://m.edmedia.aace.org/papers/38038/

Shirazi, F., Ngwenyama, O., & Morawczynski, O. (2010). ICT expansion and the digital divide in democratic freedoms: An analysis of the impact of ICT expansion, education and ICT filtering on democracy.Telematics and Informatics, 27, 21-31. doi:10.1016/j.tele.2009.05.001

Week 12 – Optional Readings

L´opez, A, 2008, ‘Circling the Cross: Bridging Native America, Education, and Digital Media.’ In A, Everett (ed) Learning Race and Ethnicity: Youth and Digital Media. Cambridge: MIT Press.

Ginsburg, F,  2008, ‘Rethinking the Digital Divide.; In P. Wilson and M. Stewart (eds) Global Indigenous Media: Cultures, Poetics, and Politics. Duke University Press.

Greenwood, J. Harata Te Aika, L, and Davis N. 2011, ‘Creating Virtual Marae:An Examination of How Digital Technologies Have Been Adopted by Māori in Aotearoa New Zealand’ In P. R. Leigh (ed) International Exploration of Technology Equity and the Digital Divide: Critical, Historical and Social Perspectives. IGI Global

Week 13 – Required Reading

Echo-Hawk, W. R. (2013). Chapter 10 In the light of justice: The rise of human rights in Native America and the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. Golden, Colorado: Fulcrum Publishing.

Trask, M.B. (2012). Implementing the Declaration. In Pulitano, E., & Trask, M. (2012). Indigenous rights in the age of the UN declaration. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge, UK : Cambridge University Press, 2012.

Anaya, SJ (2000) Indigenous Peoples in International Law. Oxford University Press.

 

Unit Schedule

Week

Date

Topic

MODULE 1: INTRODUCTION and HISTORICAL OVERVIEW

1

Sun 5 March 2017

Examining the United Nations Declaration of Human Rights of Indigenous Peoples

2

Sun 12 March 2017

Māori Education in New Zealand

3

Sun 19 March 2017

The Native American (American Indian) Experience: Pre-Colonization and the Invasion

4

Sun 26 March 2017

The Difference and Similarities between Indigenous educational experiences in Australia, New Zealand and the United States of America

MODULE 2: LANGUAGE, CULTURE and GLOBALISATION

5

Sun 2 April 2017

Cultural Relativism vs. Universal Human Rights

6

Sun 9 April 2017

Citizenship Education: A Global Perspective on Assimilation and Multiculturalism

7

Sun 16 April 2017

An overview of Global Citizenship Education

Assessment 2—Digital Storytelling Piece is due.

MID-SEMESTER BREAK (17-28 April 2017)

8

Sun 7 May 2017

Bilingualism, Multilingualism and the Preservation of Dying Languages

MODULE 3: INDIGENOUS ASSIMILATION, RESISTENCE, RECONCILIATION and SELF-DETERMINATION

9

Sun 14 May 2017

Indigenous Canadian American Resistance and Reconciliation

10

Sun 21 May 2017

Native American Resistance and Reconciliation

11

Sun 28 May 2017

Intersecting Discourses: Closing the Gaps, Social Justice and the Treaty of Waitangi

Assessment 3—4,000 word essay is due.

12

Sun 4 June 2017

Indigenous People, Internet Communication Technologies and Popular Culture

REFLECTIONS and CONCLUSIONS

13

Sun 11 June 2017

 

Policies and Procedures

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central. Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Academic Honesty Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/academic_honesty/policy.html

Assessment Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/assessment/policy_2016.html

Grade Appeal Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/gradeappeal/policy.html

Complaint Management Procedure for Students and Members of the Public http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/complaint_management/procedure.html​

Disruption to Studies Policy (in effect until Dec 4th, 2017): http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/disruption_studies/policy.html

Special Consideration Policy (in effect from Dec 4th, 2017): https://staff.mq.edu.au/work/strategy-planning-and-governance/university-policies-and-procedures/policies/special-consideration

In addition, a number of other policies can be found in the Learning and Teaching Category of Policy Central.

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/support/student_conduct/

Results

Results shown in iLearn, or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent. For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au.

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Learning Skills

Learning Skills (mq.edu.au/learningskills) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to improve your marks and take control of your study.

Student Enquiry Service

For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at ask.mq.edu.au

Equity Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

IT Help

For help with University computer systems and technology, visit http://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/information_technology/help/

When using the University's IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use of IT Resources Policy. The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network including students.

Graduate Capabilities

PG - Discipline Knowledge and Skills

Our postgraduates will be able to demonstrate a significantly enhanced depth and breadth of knowledge, scholarly understanding, and specific subject content knowledge in their chosen fields.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Critically examine the Declaration of Human Rights and develop a solid understanding of its impact on Indigenous people throughout the world
  • Develop a strong theoretical basis to understand historical injustices Indigenous people throughout the world have faced and the impact this has had on their education
  • Evaluate the impact language has had on education opportunities of Indigenous people throughout the world
  • Examine how the Treaty of Waitangi has influenced education outcomes of Māori people in Aotearoa, New Zealand
  • Demonstrate advanced knowledge of education issues that relate to minority groups in the United States of America
  • Critically compare the education experiences of Indigenous Australians to those of other First Nation People and demonstrate the ability to communicate them to others
  • Critically engage with the perspectives of other students using the prescribed online technology (i.e. iLearn)

Assessment tasks

  • Regular Online Activity
  • Digital Storytelling Piece
  • Research Essay

PG - Critical, Analytical and Integrative Thinking

Our postgraduates will be capable of utilising and reflecting on prior knowledge and experience, of applying higher level critical thinking skills, and of integrating and synthesising learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments. A characteristic of this form of thinking is the generation of new, professionally oriented knowledge through personal or group-based critique of practice and theory.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Critically examine the Declaration of Human Rights and develop a solid understanding of its impact on Indigenous people throughout the world
  • Develop a strong theoretical basis to understand historical injustices Indigenous people throughout the world have faced and the impact this has had on their education
  • Evaluate the impact language has had on education opportunities of Indigenous people throughout the world
  • Examine how the Treaty of Waitangi has influenced education outcomes of Māori people in Aotearoa, New Zealand
  • Demonstrate advanced knowledge of education issues that relate to minority groups in the United States of America
  • Critically compare the education experiences of Indigenous Australians to those of other First Nation People and demonstrate the ability to communicate them to others
  • Critically engage with the perspectives of other students using the prescribed online technology (i.e. iLearn)

Assessment tasks

  • Regular Online Activity
  • Digital Storytelling Piece
  • Research Essay

PG - Research and Problem Solving Capability

Our postgraduates will be capable of systematic enquiry; able to use research skills to create new knowledge that can be applied to real world issues, or contribute to a field of study or practice to enhance society. They will be capable of creative questioning, problem finding and problem solving.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Critically examine the Declaration of Human Rights and develop a solid understanding of its impact on Indigenous people throughout the world
  • Evaluate the impact language has had on education opportunities of Indigenous people throughout the world
  • Examine how the Treaty of Waitangi has influenced education outcomes of Māori people in Aotearoa, New Zealand
  • Critically compare the education experiences of Indigenous Australians to those of other First Nation People and demonstrate the ability to communicate them to others
  • Critically engage with the perspectives of other students using the prescribed online technology (i.e. iLearn)

Assessment tasks

  • Digital Storytelling Piece
  • Research Essay

PG - Effective Communication

Our postgraduates will be able to communicate effectively and convey their views to different social, cultural, and professional audiences. They will be able to use a variety of technologically supported media to communicate with empathy using a range of written, spoken or visual formats.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Critically examine the Declaration of Human Rights and develop a solid understanding of its impact on Indigenous people throughout the world
  • Develop a strong theoretical basis to understand historical injustices Indigenous people throughout the world have faced and the impact this has had on their education
  • Critically compare the education experiences of Indigenous Australians to those of other First Nation People and demonstrate the ability to communicate them to others
  • Critically engage with the perspectives of other students using the prescribed online technology (i.e. iLearn)

Assessment tasks

  • Regular Online Activity
  • Digital Storytelling Piece
  • Research Essay

PG - Engaged and Responsible, Active and Ethical Citizens

Our postgraduates will be ethically aware and capable of confident transformative action in relation to their professional responsibilities and the wider community. They will have a sense of connectedness with others and country and have a sense of mutual obligation. They will be able to appreciate the impact of their professional roles for social justice and inclusion related to national and global issues

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Critically examine the Declaration of Human Rights and develop a solid understanding of its impact on Indigenous people throughout the world
  • Develop a strong theoretical basis to understand historical injustices Indigenous people throughout the world have faced and the impact this has had on their education
  • Evaluate the impact language has had on education opportunities of Indigenous people throughout the world
  • Examine how the Treaty of Waitangi has influenced education outcomes of Māori people in Aotearoa, New Zealand
  • Demonstrate advanced knowledge of education issues that relate to minority groups in the United States of America
  • Critically compare the education experiences of Indigenous Australians to those of other First Nation People and demonstrate the ability to communicate them to others
  • Critically engage with the perspectives of other students using the prescribed online technology (i.e. iLearn)

Assessment task

  • Regular Online Activity

PG - Capable of Professional and Personal Judgment and Initiative

Our postgraduates will demonstrate a high standard of discernment and common sense in their professional and personal judgment. They will have the ability to make informed choices and decisions that reflect both the nature of their professional work and their personal perspectives.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Develop a strong theoretical basis to understand historical injustices Indigenous people throughout the world have faced and the impact this has had on their education
  • Critically compare the education experiences of Indigenous Australians to those of other First Nation People and demonstrate the ability to communicate them to others
  • Critically engage with the perspectives of other students using the prescribed online technology (i.e. iLearn)

Assessment task

  • Digital Storytelling Piece