Logo Students

GEOP111 – Geographies of Global Change

2017 – S1 Day

General Information

Pdf icon Download as PDF
Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff Convenor and Lecturer
Jessica McLean
Contact via email: jessica.mclean@mq.edu.au
W3A, room 416
Tuesday mornings, 10am-12pm.
Credit points Credit points
3
Prerequisites Prerequisites
Corequisites Corequisites
Co-badged status Co-badged status
Unit description Unit description
This is an introductory unit that explores local impacts of global change from three perspectives, the socio-cultural, the political and the economic. It seeks reasons for differences between places and groups of people in the impacts of globalisation. Global-local interactions are examined with specific reference to: population change and migration; urbanisation and the emergence of 'global' cities; local cultural identity in the context of global change; development and inequality; changing geopolitics of the post-Cold War era; and the implications of global economic change with special reference to the Asia–Pacific region.

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at http://students.mq.edu.au/student_admin/enrolmentguide/academicdates/

Learning Outcomes

  1. Identify key process of global change and their historical and geographical contexts.
  2. Explain the role of place and space in recent and current global processes of economic, political, social and cultural change.
  3. Outline and suggest explanations for the uneven geographic outcomes of global changes, and the connections and disconnections between places around the globe.
  4. Research, read and critically interpret the work of geographers.
  5. Produce different kinds of academic compositions that are clear, well-structured, referenced and relevant.
  6. Describe and interpret maps, geographical distributions and tables.

General Assessment Information

To successfully pass GEOP111 students must complete all assessment tasks. Failure to complete any single assessment task may result in failure of the unit. The final grade is based on the total mark accumulated from all assessment tasks.

All students must keep a clean electronic copy of all assignments (preferably as a PDF) submitted for assessment.

All students must make themselves available during the official Examination Period.

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Due
Short essay 15% 24/3/2017 at 5pm
MQ Geo Challenge 10% Week 7
Research essay 30% 19/05/2017
Final Exam 35% Exam period starts 12th June
Participation and engagement 10% Throughout the semester

Short essay

Due: 24/3/2017 at 5pm
Weighting: 15%

Critically describe three important aspects of geographies of global change. To do so, read the following readings ONLY:

Crang, P. 2014. ‘Local-global’ in (eds) P. Cloke, P. Crang & Goodwin, M. Introducing Human Geographies, Routledge: London, pp 7-22. (available as online text through www.library.mq.edu.au )

Knox, P. & Marston, S. 2015. ‘Geography Matters’ in (eds) Knox, P. & Marston, S. Human Geography: Places and Regions in Global Context, Pearson: Edinburgh, pp 28-56.

Massey, D. 2014. ‘Taking on the world’, Geography 99 (1): 36-39. (available as online text through www.library.mq.edu.au )

750 word count means within 10% of 750 words, so either 75 words under or above this word count is acceptable.  The references at the end of the essay are NOT included in this word count.  

Essays will be submitted electronically through iLearn and graded by your tutor. 

In your essay, it is essential to draw on specific examples from the readings and write a coherent, clear argument.

  • Presentation should be formal academic writing, double spaced, 12pt font.
  • Fully referenced in Harvard style, with an alphabetised Reference list included at the end.
  • Reference list not included in the 750 word count.
  • Maps, figures and diagrams are acceptable, but must be relevant, referred to in text (for example: 'Figure 1 shows that...'), captioned with source, source in reference list.
  • See Hay (2006) for futher help with academic writing in geography (listed in suggested GEOP111 readings)

LATE ASSIGNMENTS will be penalised by 1 mark per day (1% of your total unit grade).  This means that an assignment worth 10% coming in 4 days late will therefore have 4 marks out of the grade deducted.  So if it is graded as P+ (6.5/10) it would be reduced to F (2.5/10). 

Extensions must be requested and granted prior to the due date. Requests must be processed through ask.mq.edu.au. 

Feedback will be available via your Turnitin submission.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Identify key process of global change and their historical and geographical contexts.
  • Explain the role of place and space in recent and current global processes of economic, political, social and cultural change.
  • Research, read and critically interpret the work of geographers.
  • Produce different kinds of academic compositions that are clear, well-structured, referenced and relevant.
  • Describe and interpret maps, geographical distributions and tables.

MQ Geo Challenge

Due: Week 7
Weighting: 10%

The Macquarie Geography Challenge is an opportunity to meet others and to learn new skills.  In the first tutorial you will be assigned to iLearn groups and given a set of questions and tasks.  You must be registered in an iLearn group to participate in this assessment. 

As a group, you will organise to complete the set tasks and arrange your answers/proof of completion in a web presentation using an easily available platform (such as prezi, tumblr, Wordpress).

In Week 7, you will present your web based presentation to your tutorial class. A rubric will be available on iLearn to detail how grades will be awarded for this assessment task. 

You will be assessed on the adequate completion of the activities, creativity, and evidence. 

The assignment will be submitted online by one group member prior to your tutorial time for week 7. 


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Identify key process of global change and their historical and geographical contexts.
  • Explain the role of place and space in recent and current global processes of economic, political, social and cultural change.
  • Outline and suggest explanations for the uneven geographic outcomes of global changes, and the connections and disconnections between places around the globe.
  • Research, read and critically interpret the work of geographers.
  • Produce different kinds of academic compositions that are clear, well-structured, referenced and relevant.
  • Describe and interpret maps, geographical distributions and tables.

Research essay

Due: 19/05/2017
Weighting: 30%

'The structures and flows of globalisation are variously embraced, resisted, subverted, and exploited as they make contact with specific places and specific communities. In the process, places and regions are reconstructed rather than effaced.’  (Knox and Marston, 2014:73). 

Critically analyse this quote from your textbook. In your essay, provide two clear examples of places and regions that have been reconstructed by the structures and flows of globalisation. 

Essay writing requirements:

In your essay, it is essential to draw on specific examples from your research, reading, lectures and tutorials.

  • Presentation should be formal academic writing, double spaced, 12pt font.
  • Fully referenced in Harvard style, with an alphabetised Reference list included at the end.
  • Reference list not included in the 2000 word count.
  • Maps, figures and diagrams are acceptable, but must be relevant, referred to in text (for example: 'Figure 1 shows that...'), captioned with source, source in reference list.
  • Must include a minimum of six academic references (academic books, journal articles, official reports).
  • Must include an introduction and conclusion, and subheadings for each new section
  • See Hay (2006) for further help with academic writing in geography (listed in suggested GEOP111 readings)

LATE ASSIGNMENTS will be penalised by 1 mark per day (1% of your total unit grade).  This means that an assignment worth 10% coming in 4 days late will therefore have 4 marks out of the grade deducted.  So if it is graded as P+ (6.5/10) it would be reduced to F (2.5/10). 

Extensions must be requested and granted prior to the due date. Requests must be processed through ask.mq.edu.au.

Feedback will be available via your Turnitin submission.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Identify key process of global change and their historical and geographical contexts.
  • Explain the role of place and space in recent and current global processes of economic, political, social and cultural change.
  • Outline and suggest explanations for the uneven geographic outcomes of global changes, and the connections and disconnections between places around the globe.
  • Research, read and critically interpret the work of geographers.
  • Produce different kinds of academic compositions that are clear, well-structured, referenced and relevant.
  • Describe and interpret maps, geographical distributions and tables.

Final Exam

Due: Exam period starts 12th June
Weighting: 35%

Exams are administered through the Examinations Office.  You will have to sit the exam at Macquarie University or an approved centre.  Timetables will be available online nearer to the exam period.  You MUST be available to sit an exam at any time during the exam period. 


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Identify key process of global change and their historical and geographical contexts.
  • Explain the role of place and space in recent and current global processes of economic, political, social and cultural change.
  • Outline and suggest explanations for the uneven geographic outcomes of global changes, and the connections and disconnections between places around the globe.
  • Research, read and critically interpret the work of geographers.
  • Produce different kinds of academic compositions that are clear, well-structured, referenced and relevant.
  • Describe and interpret maps, geographical distributions and tables.

Participation and engagement

Due: Throughout the semester
Weighting: 10%

Your class preparation and engagement will be assessed throughout the semester. Detailed instructions are available on iLearn. Ensure you read these instructions closely.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Identify key process of global change and their historical and geographical contexts.
  • Explain the role of place and space in recent and current global processes of economic, political, social and cultural change.
  • Outline and suggest explanations for the uneven geographic outcomes of global changes, and the connections and disconnections between places around the globe.
  • Research, read and critically interpret the work of geographers.
  • Produce different kinds of academic compositions that are clear, well-structured, referenced and relevant.
  • Describe and interpret maps, geographical distributions and tables.

Delivery and Resources

Classes

Unit offered:

Session 1, 2017.  Internal and External enrolments are possible.

Lectures:

Lectures (each one hour) are held at

Lectures and tutorials start at five minutes past the hour and finish at five minutes before the hour to allow you to move across campus for other classes.

Tutorials:

GEOP111 has a full schedule of tutorials that enhance your general and discipline-specific skills and knowledge. It is important that you attend all tutorials for GEOP111 if you are an internal student and complete all online activities if you are an external student. Please register for your tutorial via eStudent, and attend the same tutorial each week.  Participation grades will be allocated for student involvement in tutorials. 

Your groups for Macquarie Geography Challenge will be assigned within your first tutorial class for internal students or within the first week of semester for external students.

Required and Recommended Texts and/or Materials

Most of the readings come from the required text:

Knox, P. and Marston, S. (2016). Human Geography: Places and Regions in Global Context. New International Edition.  Pearson, Harlow.

This textbook comes with access to MasteringGeography, a useful tool for successful learning in GEOP111, but it is optional. 

Other readings will be assigned during the session which may be accessed by iLearn and eReserve.

Other recommended texts include:

Hartley, P. and Dawsom, M. (2010) Success in Groupwork, Palgrave Macmillan, New York.

Hay, I. (2006) Communicating in Geography and the Environmental Sciences.  Oxford University Press (3rd edition), Melbourne.

Unit webpage and Technology used and required

All enrolled students have access to the unit website at https://ilearn.mq.edu.au/login/MQ/ .  Access to the website is essential to complete GEOP111.  External students complete the entire unit online. 

Unit webpage - GEOP111

The webpage for this unit can be found at iLearn, the Macquarie University online learning system at https://ilearn.mq.edu.au.  iLearn has both a discussion board and an internal email system.  The webpage will provide you with access to lectures through the University's echo360 lecture recording facility, as well as to follow-up discussion, links, readings supplied by teachers of GEOP111 and forum discussions. 

Late Assignments

Please note that the penalty for late submission of assignments is 1 mark per day (i.e. 1% of your total unit grade) calculated from 5pm on the due date listed. A weekend will be counted as two days in calculating the late penalty imposed. 

An assignment worth 10% coming in 4 days late will therefore have 4 marks of the grade deducted. This means if it was graded as a P+ (6.5/10), it would be reduced to F (2.5/10).  An assignment worth 30% coming in 4 days late would have 4 marks of the grade deducted. This means it would go from P+ (19/30) to P- (15/30). One day later and it would fail!  Several capable students have failed this and other papers because their assignments were handed in so late, with no communication with a lecturer or tutor. 

 

Unit Schedule

Semester week

Lecture

Required reading

Tutorial class

 

Module 1: Introducing ‘Geographies of Global Change’

 

Week 1

27th February

L1: Unit introduction

L2: Geographies of Global Change

 

‘Geography Matters’ in textbook – pp 28-56.

Technology for GEOP111 and starting MQ Geo Challenge

Week 2

6th March

L3: Contemporary Globalisation/

Preparing first assessment task

L4: Geography and Planning experts

‘The Changing Global Context’ in textbook pp 56-90

Why am I studying geographies of global change?

Module 2: Cultural geographies

 

Week 3

13th March

L5: Cultural geographies

L6: Unsettling colonisation: Indigenous culture and change

‘Cultural Geographies’ in textbook pp 178-212.

‘Sense of Place’: The global in the local

Week 4

20th March

L7: Geographies of music

L8: Sex, gender and geography

 

McLean, J. Maalsen, S. and Grech, A. 2016. ‘Learning from Feminism in Digital Spaces:

digital spaces: Online methodologies and participatory mapping’, Australian Geographer. DOI: 10.1080/00049182.2016.1138842.

 

Geography and gender

Module 3: Urban Geography

 

Week 5

27th March

L9: Urbanisation and global change

L10: The rise of global cities

 

‘Urbanisation and the Global Urban System’ in textbook pp 418-454 

Critical writing

Week 6

3rd April

L11: Sustainable cities

L12: Urban planning

TBC

Census data

 

Week 7

10th April

 

No face-to-face lectures: public holiday on 14th April

 

No reading

No tutorials

Module 4: Environmental Humanities

 

Week 8

1st May

 

L13: What are the Environmental Humanities? (Dr Emily O’Gorman)

L14: Nature, people and culture

 

 

Cronon, W. The Trouble with Wilderness; Or, Getting Back to the Wrong Nature

Environmental History, 1996, Vol. 1(1), pp.7-28.

 

 

Developing research skills

 

Week 9

8th May

 

L15: Human-animal geographies/relations

L16: Politics of Conservation

 

Plumwood, V. 1996. ‘Being Prey’, Terra Nova: Nature and Culture, 1(3): 33-44.

 

Content tutorial: The politics of food

Week 10

15th May

L17: Into the Anthropocene?

L18: Panel on the Anthropocene

 

‘People and Nature’ in textbook pp 132-178

Critical reading skills

Module 5: Geographies of Development

 

Week 11

22nd May

L19: Economic Geographies

L20: Economic Geographies

‘Geographies of Economic Development’ in textbook pp 284-300.

Mapping micro-geographies of power

 

Week 12

29th May

L21: Geographies of Development

L22: Geographies of consumption

 

Continue ‘Geographies of Economic Development’ chapter in textbook pp 301-324

Exam tutorial

Reviewing ‘Geographies of Global Change’ and looking to future studies and work

 

Week 13

5th June

L23: Careers and future studies in Geography and Planning

L24: Unit Review

 

No new readings

No tutorial

Learning and Teaching Activities

Lectures

Most weeks of the semester we will have two lectures of one hour duration, covering core unit content and sharing assessment task information and tips. Some weeks we will only have one face-to-face lecture and students will do online activities such as watch a short pre-recorded video and discuss these in tutorials.

Tutorials

Tutorials will comprise of a series of weekly 1 hour activities, focused on skills and content-specific tasks, to extend and apply the ideas shared in lectures and from your readings.

Assessment tasks

The assessment tasks of GEOP111 are designed to help you meet the learning outcomes for the unit. The unit is designed to support your critical thinking and writing skills as well as enhance your skills in oral presentation, web-based presentation and group-based work.

Policies and Procedures

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central. Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Academic Honesty Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/academic_honesty/policy.html

Assessment Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/assessment/policy_2016.html

Grade Appeal Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/gradeappeal/policy.html

Complaint Management Procedure for Students and Members of the Public http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/complaint_management/procedure.html​

Disruption to Studies Policy http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/disruption_studies/policy.html The Disruption to Studies Policy is effective from March 3 2014 and replaces the Special Consideration Policy.

In addition, a number of other policies can be found in the Learning and Teaching Category of Policy Central.

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/support/student_conduct/

Results

Results shown in iLearn, or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent. For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au.

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Learning Skills

Learning Skills (mq.edu.au/learningskills) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to improve your marks and take control of your study.

Student Enquiry Service

For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at ask.mq.edu.au

Equity Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

IT Help

For help with University computer systems and technology, visit http://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/information_technology/help/

When using the University's IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use of IT Resources Policy. The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network including students.

Graduate Capabilities

Discipline Specific Knowledge and Skills

Our graduates will take with them the intellectual development, depth and breadth of knowledge, scholarly understanding, and specific subject content in their chosen fields to make them competent and confident in their subject or profession. They will be able to demonstrate, where relevant, professional technical competence and meet professional standards. They will be able to articulate the structure of knowledge of their discipline, be able to adapt discipline-specific knowledge to novel situations, and be able to contribute from their discipline to inter-disciplinary solutions to problems.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Identify key process of global change and their historical and geographical contexts.
  • Explain the role of place and space in recent and current global processes of economic, political, social and cultural change.
  • Outline and suggest explanations for the uneven geographic outcomes of global changes, and the connections and disconnections between places around the globe.
  • Research, read and critically interpret the work of geographers.
  • Describe and interpret maps, geographical distributions and tables.

Assessment tasks

  • Short essay
  • MQ Geo Challenge
  • Research essay
  • Final Exam
  • Participation and engagement

Critical, Analytical and Integrative Thinking

We want our graduates to be capable of reasoning, questioning and analysing, and to integrate and synthesise learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments; to be able to critique constraints, assumptions and limitations; to be able to think independently and systemically in relation to scholarly activity, in the workplace, and in the world. We want them to have a level of scientific and information technology literacy.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Identify key process of global change and their historical and geographical contexts.
  • Explain the role of place and space in recent and current global processes of economic, political, social and cultural change.
  • Outline and suggest explanations for the uneven geographic outcomes of global changes, and the connections and disconnections between places around the globe.
  • Research, read and critically interpret the work of geographers.
  • Produce different kinds of academic compositions that are clear, well-structured, referenced and relevant.
  • Describe and interpret maps, geographical distributions and tables.

Assessment tasks

  • Short essay
  • MQ Geo Challenge
  • Research essay
  • Final Exam
  • Participation and engagement

Problem Solving and Research Capability

Our graduates should be capable of researching; of analysing, and interpreting and assessing data and information in various forms; of drawing connections across fields of knowledge; and they should be able to relate their knowledge to complex situations at work or in the world, in order to diagnose and solve problems. We want them to have the confidence to take the initiative in doing so, within an awareness of their own limitations.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Identify key process of global change and their historical and geographical contexts.
  • Explain the role of place and space in recent and current global processes of economic, political, social and cultural change.
  • Outline and suggest explanations for the uneven geographic outcomes of global changes, and the connections and disconnections between places around the globe.
  • Research, read and critically interpret the work of geographers.
  • Produce different kinds of academic compositions that are clear, well-structured, referenced and relevant.
  • Describe and interpret maps, geographical distributions and tables.

Assessment tasks

  • Short essay
  • MQ Geo Challenge
  • Research essay
  • Final Exam
  • Participation and engagement

Creative and Innovative

Our graduates will also be capable of creative thinking and of creating knowledge. They will be imaginative and open to experience and capable of innovation at work and in the community. We want them to be engaged in applying their critical, creative thinking.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Explain the role of place and space in recent and current global processes of economic, political, social and cultural change.
  • Outline and suggest explanations for the uneven geographic outcomes of global changes, and the connections and disconnections between places around the globe.
  • Research, read and critically interpret the work of geographers.
  • Produce different kinds of academic compositions that are clear, well-structured, referenced and relevant.

Assessment tasks

  • Short essay
  • MQ Geo Challenge
  • Research essay
  • Participation and engagement

Effective Communication

We want to develop in our students the ability to communicate and convey their views in forms effective with different audiences. We want our graduates to take with them the capability to read, listen, question, gather and evaluate information resources in a variety of formats, assess, write clearly, speak effectively, and to use visual communication and communication technologies as appropriate.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Identify key process of global change and their historical and geographical contexts.
  • Explain the role of place and space in recent and current global processes of economic, political, social and cultural change.
  • Outline and suggest explanations for the uneven geographic outcomes of global changes, and the connections and disconnections between places around the globe.
  • Research, read and critically interpret the work of geographers.
  • Produce different kinds of academic compositions that are clear, well-structured, referenced and relevant.
  • Describe and interpret maps, geographical distributions and tables.

Assessment tasks

  • Short essay
  • MQ Geo Challenge
  • Research essay
  • Final Exam
  • Participation and engagement

Engaged and Ethical Local and Global citizens

As local citizens our graduates will be aware of indigenous perspectives and of the nation's historical context. They will be engaged with the challenges of contemporary society and with knowledge and ideas. We want our graduates to have respect for diversity, to be open-minded, sensitive to others and inclusive, and to be open to other cultures and perspectives: they should have a level of cultural literacy. Our graduates should be aware of disadvantage and social justice, and be willing to participate to help create a wiser and better society.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Identify key process of global change and their historical and geographical contexts.
  • Explain the role of place and space in recent and current global processes of economic, political, social and cultural change.
  • Outline and suggest explanations for the uneven geographic outcomes of global changes, and the connections and disconnections between places around the globe.
  • Research, read and critically interpret the work of geographers.
  • Produce different kinds of academic compositions that are clear, well-structured, referenced and relevant.
  • Describe and interpret maps, geographical distributions and tables.

Assessment tasks

  • Short essay
  • MQ Geo Challenge
  • Research essay
  • Final Exam
  • Participation and engagement

Socially and Environmentally Active and Responsible

We want our graduates to be aware of and have respect for self and others; to be able to work with others as a leader and a team player; to have a sense of connectedness with others and country; and to have a sense of mutual obligation. Our graduates should be informed and active participants in moving society towards sustainability.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Explain the role of place and space in recent and current global processes of economic, political, social and cultural change.
  • Outline and suggest explanations for the uneven geographic outcomes of global changes, and the connections and disconnections between places around the globe.
  • Research, read and critically interpret the work of geographers.
  • Produce different kinds of academic compositions that are clear, well-structured, referenced and relevant.
  • Describe and interpret maps, geographical distributions and tables.

Assessment tasks

  • MQ Geo Challenge
  • Research essay
  • Final Exam
  • Participation and engagement

Capable of Professional and Personal Judgement and Initiative

We want our graduates to have emotional intelligence and sound interpersonal skills and to demonstrate discernment and common sense in their professional and personal judgement. They will exercise initiative as needed. They will be capable of risk assessment, and be able to handle ambiguity and complexity, enabling them to be adaptable in diverse and changing environments.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Explain the role of place and space in recent and current global processes of economic, political, social and cultural change.
  • Outline and suggest explanations for the uneven geographic outcomes of global changes, and the connections and disconnections between places around the globe.
  • Research, read and critically interpret the work of geographers.
  • Produce different kinds of academic compositions that are clear, well-structured, referenced and relevant.
  • Describe and interpret maps, geographical distributions and tables.

Assessment tasks

  • Short essay
  • MQ Geo Challenge
  • Research essay
  • Final Exam
  • Participation and engagement

Commitment to Continuous Learning

Our graduates will have enquiring minds and a literate curiosity which will lead them to pursue knowledge for its own sake. They will continue to pursue learning in their careers and as they participate in the world. They will be capable of reflecting on their experiences and relationships with others and the environment, learning from them, and growing - personally, professionally and socially.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Identify key process of global change and their historical and geographical contexts.
  • Explain the role of place and space in recent and current global processes of economic, political, social and cultural change.
  • Outline and suggest explanations for the uneven geographic outcomes of global changes, and the connections and disconnections between places around the globe.
  • Research, read and critically interpret the work of geographers.
  • Produce different kinds of academic compositions that are clear, well-structured, referenced and relevant.
  • Describe and interpret maps, geographical distributions and tables.

Assessment tasks

  • Short essay
  • MQ Geo Challenge
  • Research essay
  • Final Exam
  • Participation and engagement

Changes from Previous Offering

The MQ Geo Challenge is now able to be undertaken by all students, internal and external. External students are able to submit their completed work online rather than present in a classroom setting.

The research essay question has been redesigned to help students construct a clear essay and think critically about complex local and global forces of change.

In 2017 there is a 10% participation grade for internal students to assess their contribution to tutorial discussions. This will reward students for contributing to valuable conversations that will advance their learning.    

Three modules now have blended learning activities that aim to support students in discovering what future careers they may undertake in geography and planning and how their current studies are relevant to everyday planning and governance issues.