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GEOP463 – Planning and Design Project

2017 – S2 Day

General Information

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Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff Convenor
Linda Kelly
Contact via email
Credit points Credit points
3
Prerequisites Prerequisites
Admission to BPlan and (39cp at 100 level or above) including ENVG370 or GEOP370
Corequisites Corequisites
Co-badged status Co-badged status
Unit description Unit description
This unit provides an opportunity for final year planning students to consolidate, integrate and synthesise prior knowledge and learning across the multiple subjects of the program. The assessment focus of the unit culminates in the development of a site master plan for a local council. The workshop format of the unit combines group and individual work and provides an opportunity to advance specific skills necessary for strategic and site master planning and how this relates to urban planning at a local to regional scale. Attendance at six full-day workshops on campus is compulsory and active participation is required. There is no final examination.

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at http://students.mq.edu.au/student_admin/enrolmentguide/academicdates/

Learning Outcomes

  1. A critical understanding of the role of planning in designing healthy built environments.
  2. Experience in the preparation of strategic planning documents.
  3. An awareness of the planner's role in communicating issues to different audiences
  4. An understanding of the interplay between planning and design and the planner's various roles in this process.
  5. An ability to present complex issues clearly and succinctly.
  6. An understanding of how to undertake various practical skills expected of a planner in the workplace.

General Assessment Information

Assessment tasks are designed to ensure you are getting something out of the unit. You have a lot to gain from completing each task well – both as a student and a soon-to-be professional planner. Please let the unit convenor know if you need clarification about the expectations for each task. Some general information:

  • Late assignments will incur a 10% penalty per day late, including weekends. This penalty will be applied unless a valid medical certificate is supplied or alternative acceptable documentation. Please contact the unit convenor as soon as possible if you are unwell and unlikely to make a deadline.
  • Familiarise yourself with the University’s policy on plagiarism.
  • Follow the guidelines provided for each assessment task carefully, taking note of the marking criteria.
  • All assignments should be well presented and properly referenced.
  • Text should be in a minimum of 11 point font, 2cm margins and use headings and subheadings as appropriate.
  • Use diagrams (maps, plans, photos, images) as appropriate – always cite them if they’re not yours; always incorporate them into your text using captions and/or descriptions; always make sure they are of a size and quality to be readable and useful.
  • Proof-read your work (more than once)
  • Use Australian English
  • Use the Harvard system of referencing.
  • Assessment tasks are to be submitted on iLearn under 'Assessments' (Turnitin) at the beginning of class in the week that they are due.
  • Examples of assessment tasks and grading rubrics are provided on iLearn as a guide to students.

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Hurdle Due
Preparing a submission 20% Week 4
Planning for Health 30% Week 8
Site planning and design 40% Week 13
Attendance and participation 10% ongoing

Preparing a submission

Due: Week 4
Weighting: 20%

The NSW Parliament has launched an inquiry into Land Release and Housing Supply in NSW. You are to prepare a submission to the Inquiry within the framework of the Committee's Terms of Reference. You may draft the submission from the perspective of either a State government authority, a local council, a property developer or developer lobby group.

https://www.parliament.nsw.gov.au/committees/inquiries/pages/inquiries.aspx


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • An awareness of the planner's role in communicating issues to different audiences
  • An ability to present complex issues clearly and succinctly.
  • An understanding of how to undertake various practical skills expected of a planner in the workplace.

Planning for Health

Due: Week 8
Weighting: 30%

You are to undertake an evaluation of the Bay Walk, a recreational path that goes around Iron Cove between Drummoyne and Lilyfield. Ideally, you should do the 7 kilometre walk at least twice – once clockwise and once anticlockwise. This task entails some observational research with you as a participant. In evaluating the Walk you need to:

  • establish your criteria for evaluation – make sure you include its role in planning for healthy environments
  • identify any gaps or weaknesses
  • make recommendations for changes or improvements

Your paper should be presented with evidential material supporting your evaluation, such as photos, maps or sketches from your walk. You could chose to do the walk as a pedestrian, cyclist, runner, pushing a stroller, walking alone or in a group. All these variables will create a different result.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • A critical understanding of the role of planning in designing healthy built environments.
  • An understanding of the interplay between planning and design and the planner's various roles in this process.
  • An ability to present complex issues clearly and succinctly.
  • An understanding of how to undertake various practical skills expected of a planner in the workplace.

Site planning and design

Due: Week 13
Weighting: 40%

Planning for redevelopment – this task centres around the potential redevelopment of a site. You need to develop a site specific plan to guide redevelopment. Parts to this task include:

  • Understanding the existing situation, eg land uses, building heights, neighbourhood character
  • Understanding the planning context
  • Identifying opportunities and constraints
  • Making recommendations for any changes to the LEP
  • Developing a plan to show development guidelines
  • preparation of a 2,000 word (maximum) background document
  • preparation of an A3 plan and guidelines (max 2 pages)

This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Experience in the preparation of strategic planning documents.
  • An understanding of the interplay between planning and design and the planner's various roles in this process.
  • An ability to present complex issues clearly and succinctly.
  • An understanding of how to undertake various practical skills expected of a planner in the workplace.

Attendance and participation

Due: ongoing
Weighting: 10%

 

Attendance is compulsory and non-attendance at workshops will require documentation in the form of a doctor's note, etc. Please refer to Macquarie University's 'Disruption to Studies' policy for appropriate forms of documentation.  The unit is being taught involving you in active learning which will require you to participate in activities each session. The activities are designed to provide you with essential skills for working as a planner. In order to achieve maximum marks for this assessment it will not be sufficient to simply turn up, you will need to demonstrate engagement and participation. Attendance will be recorded at each workshop.  Therefore failure to attend the workshops may impact upon other assessments and could lead to a fail result for the unit.  A mark of 10% has been assigned to participation and attendance and this will be recorded on the basis of attendance and active participation in class discussions.

 


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Experience in the preparation of strategic planning documents.
  • An awareness of the planner's role in communicating issues to different audiences
  • An understanding of the interplay between planning and design and the planner's various roles in this process.
  • An ability to present complex issues clearly and succinctly.
  • An understanding of how to undertake various practical skills expected of a planner in the workplace.

Delivery and Resources

GEOP463: Planning and Design Project is the capstone for the Bachelor of Planning and is valued at 3 credit points. The goal of this unit is to provide an opportunity in the final year to consolidate, integrate and synthesise prior knowledge and learning across the multiple subjects of the program.

The workshop format of the unit combines group and individual work and provides an opportunity to advance specific skills necessary for a planner in the workplace. The assessment tasks are individual, however, the workshop activities will include working on your own, in pairs and in groups. This will reinforce skills of working independently as well as working co-operatively and collaboratively.

GEOP463 is taught in block mode using seven three - four hour workshops over the course of the semester. Each session will include the following components:

  • Lecture
  • Student presentation on previous workshop activity
  • Activity – field based and classroom based  

Recommended readings:

Gehl, J (2011) Life Between Buildings, Using Public Space, Island Press, Washington DC

Leichhardt Council (2013) Development Control Plan 2013 (accessed 24 July 2017) http://www.leichhardt.nsw.gov.au/Planning---Development/Planning-Controls--DCPs--LEPs--VPAs-/DCPs

Low, S (1996) “Spatialising Cultutre: the Social Production and Social Construction of Public Space in Costa Rica” America Ethnologist 23 (4): 861-879

Madanipour, A (ed) (2010) Whose Public Space? International case studies in urban design and development, Routledge, Oxon

NSW Heritage Office and Royal Australian Institute of Architects (2005) Design in Context: Guidelines for Infill Development in the Historic Environment http://www.environment.nsw.gov.au/resources/heritagebranch/heritage/DesignInContext.pdf (Accessed 24 July 2017)

Urban Design Advisory Service (1998) Neighbourhood Character: An urban design approach for identifying neighbourhood character, Sydney, Department of Urban Affairs and Planning (in MQ Library)

Whyte, W (1980) The social life of small urban spaces,The Conservation Foundation, Washington DC

You will need to read widely to prepare for your assessment tasks.  Additional resources will be posted on iLearn as appropriate. You are expected to undertake your own research to identify appropriate materials and readings to inform your submissions.

As attendance at workshops is compulsory and there are only seven scheduled for the semester, the lectures will not be recorded. Any slides presented during the workshop will be posted in iLearn.

Unit Schedule

12noon - 4pm Mondays in Room W5C 303

 

Week #, date and time

Workshop Topic

Activity

Student Presentation

Week 1

31 July

12noon - 2pm

Introduction to unit and assessment tasks

Community profiles having regard to 2016 Census data

Introductions

Week 3

14 August

12noon – 4pm

 

 

Planning for the public domain

 

 

 

Fieldwork: Pedestrian mobility exercise

Individual presentation of research data: Your local community profile

Week 5

28 August

12noon - 4pm

Planning for development

 

 

 

 

Fieldwork: identifying neighbourhood character

Pairs presentation of field research: pedestrian mobility

Week 7

11 September

12noon - 4pm

 

Assessing Design

 

 

Shadow diagrams

 

Group presentation of fieldwork: neighbourhood character

Mid semester break 18 - 29 September

     

Week 9

9 October

12noon - 4pm

Planning for centres and precincts

DA assessment/preparing SEE

 

Week 11

23 October

12noon - 4pm

 

 

Communicating the planning message & customer service

 

 

Writing for different audiences 

Codes SEPP

 

Week 12

30 October

12noon - 1.30pm

 

Putting it all together - life after uni

 

 

 

Reflection on unit

 

 

Policies and Procedures

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central. Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Academic Honesty Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/academic_honesty/policy.html

Assessment Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/assessment/policy_2016.html

Grade Appeal Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/gradeappeal/policy.html

Complaint Management Procedure for Students and Members of the Public http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/complaint_management/procedure.html​

Disruption to Studies Policy (in effect until Dec 4th, 2017): http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/disruption_studies/policy.html

Special Consideration Policy (in effect from Dec 4th, 2017): https://staff.mq.edu.au/work/strategy-planning-and-governance/university-policies-and-procedures/policies/special-consideration

In addition, a number of other policies can be found in the Learning and Teaching Category of Policy Central.

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/support/student_conduct/

Results

Results shown in iLearn, or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent. For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au.

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Learning Skills

Learning Skills (mq.edu.au/learningskills) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to improve your marks and take control of your study.

Student Enquiry Service

For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at ask.mq.edu.au

Equity Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

IT Help

For help with University computer systems and technology, visit http://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/information_technology/help/

When using the University's IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use of IT Resources Policy. The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network including students.

Graduate Capabilities

Discipline Specific Knowledge and Skills

Our graduates will take with them the intellectual development, depth and breadth of knowledge, scholarly understanding, and specific subject content in their chosen fields to make them competent and confident in their subject or profession. They will be able to demonstrate, where relevant, professional technical competence and meet professional standards. They will be able to articulate the structure of knowledge of their discipline, be able to adapt discipline-specific knowledge to novel situations, and be able to contribute from their discipline to inter-disciplinary solutions to problems.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • A critical understanding of the role of planning in designing healthy built environments.
  • Experience in the preparation of strategic planning documents.
  • An understanding of the interplay between planning and design and the planner's various roles in this process.
  • An understanding of how to undertake various practical skills expected of a planner in the workplace.

Assessment tasks

  • Preparing a submission
  • Planning for Health
  • Site planning and design
  • Attendance and participation

Critical, Analytical and Integrative Thinking

We want our graduates to be capable of reasoning, questioning and analysing, and to integrate and synthesise learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments; to be able to critique constraints, assumptions and limitations; to be able to think independently and systemically in relation to scholarly activity, in the workplace, and in the world. We want them to have a level of scientific and information technology literacy.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • A critical understanding of the role of planning in designing healthy built environments.
  • An understanding of the interplay between planning and design and the planner's various roles in this process.
  • An ability to present complex issues clearly and succinctly.

Assessment tasks

  • Preparing a submission
  • Planning for Health
  • Site planning and design
  • Attendance and participation

Problem Solving and Research Capability

Our graduates should be capable of researching; of analysing, and interpreting and assessing data and information in various forms; of drawing connections across fields of knowledge; and they should be able to relate their knowledge to complex situations at work or in the world, in order to diagnose and solve problems. We want them to have the confidence to take the initiative in doing so, within an awareness of their own limitations.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • Experience in the preparation of strategic planning documents.

Assessment tasks

  • Site planning and design
  • Attendance and participation

Creative and Innovative

Our graduates will also be capable of creative thinking and of creating knowledge. They will be imaginative and open to experience and capable of innovation at work and in the community. We want them to be engaged in applying their critical, creative thinking.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Experience in the preparation of strategic planning documents.
  • An ability to present complex issues clearly and succinctly.

Assessment tasks

  • Preparing a submission
  • Planning for Health
  • Site planning and design
  • Attendance and participation

Effective Communication

We want to develop in our students the ability to communicate and convey their views in forms effective with different audiences. We want our graduates to take with them the capability to read, listen, question, gather and evaluate information resources in a variety of formats, assess, write clearly, speak effectively, and to use visual communication and communication technologies as appropriate.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • An awareness of the planner's role in communicating issues to different audiences
  • An ability to present complex issues clearly and succinctly.

Assessment tasks

  • Preparing a submission
  • Planning for Health
  • Site planning and design
  • Attendance and participation

Engaged and Ethical Local and Global citizens

As local citizens our graduates will be aware of indigenous perspectives and of the nation's historical context. They will be engaged with the challenges of contemporary society and with knowledge and ideas. We want our graduates to have respect for diversity, to be open-minded, sensitive to others and inclusive, and to be open to other cultures and perspectives: they should have a level of cultural literacy. Our graduates should be aware of disadvantage and social justice, and be willing to participate to help create a wiser and better society.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • An awareness of the planner's role in communicating issues to different audiences

Assessment tasks

  • Preparing a submission
  • Attendance and participation

Socially and Environmentally Active and Responsible

We want our graduates to be aware of and have respect for self and others; to be able to work with others as a leader and a team player; to have a sense of connectedness with others and country; and to have a sense of mutual obligation. Our graduates should be informed and active participants in moving society towards sustainability.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • An understanding of the interplay between planning and design and the planner's various roles in this process.

Assessment tasks

  • Planning for Health
  • Site planning and design
  • Attendance and participation

Capable of Professional and Personal Judgement and Initiative

We want our graduates to have emotional intelligence and sound interpersonal skills and to demonstrate discernment and common sense in their professional and personal judgement. They will exercise initiative as needed. They will be capable of risk assessment, and be able to handle ambiguity and complexity, enabling them to be adaptable in diverse and changing environments.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • An awareness of the planner's role in communicating issues to different audiences
  • An understanding of the interplay between planning and design and the planner's various roles in this process.
  • An ability to present complex issues clearly and succinctly.

Assessment tasks

  • Preparing a submission
  • Planning for Health
  • Site planning and design
  • Attendance and participation

Changes since First Published

Date Description
24/07/2017 1. Various typos found in document, including dates & times in Unit Schedule 2. Due date for assessment 1 changed from week 5 to week 4 3. One dot point for assessments 2 & 3 deleted 4. Links to references in Delivery & Resources updated