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CHIR603 – Chiropractic B

2017 – S2 Day

General Information

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Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit Convenor
Roger Engel
Contact via Email
Building C5C (west) Room 354
By appointment
Contract Lecturer & Tutor
Simon Rahme
Contact via Email
N/A
By appointment
Contract Lecturer & Tutor
Christopher Agius
Contact via Email
N/A
By appointment
Co-convenor/Lecturer
Aron Downie
Building C5C (west) Room 356
By appointment
Lecturer
Anneliese Hulme
Credit points Credit points
8
Prerequisites Prerequisites
CHIR602
Corequisites Corequisites
Co-badged status Co-badged status
Unit description Unit description
This unit develops the material covered in CHIR602. It covers spinal manipulation techniques for the cervical, thoracic and lumbo-pelvic regions. The unit covers a 'core' group of techniques and aims at proficiency of this core. The unit further develops the student's knowledge of research methodology.

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at http://students.mq.edu.au/student_admin/enrolmentguide/academicdates/

Learning Outcomes

  1. The ability to perform a basic set of spinal and a full set of peripheral adjustments and/or mobilisations with a level of psychomotor skill that is appropriate for these procedures i.e. tactile/palpatory skills and hand/body/eye co-ordination of practitioner movements.
  2. The ability to control these procedures with regard to patient position, practitioner position, primary contact, secondary contact, lock-up/set-up, speed, amplitude and line of drive.
  3. The ability to perform basic static and motion palpation on all spinal and peripheral joints in the body.
  4. An understanding of peripheral and spinal joint mechanics.
  5. A thorough knowledge of human neuro-anatomy.
  6. A thorough knowledge of the functional anatomy of the human body including: a) A basic knowledge of the biomechanical effects of an adjustment or mobilisation and the indications for their use; b) A basic knowledge of structural analysis as it relates to posture and dysfunction; c) The ability to demonstrate an appropriate level of care in the handling of a patient; d) The ability to demonstrate motion palpation findings for spinal and peripheral joints.
  7. An understanding of the basic tenants underpinning modern scientific research.

General Assessment Information

GRADES

HD      High Distinction         Denotes work of outstanding quality

D         Distinction                  Denotes work of superior quality

Cr        Credit                          Denotes work of predominantly good quality

P          Pass                             Denotes work of satisfactory quality

F          Fail                              Denotes a candidate has failed to complete the unit                                                              satisfactorily

 

Achievement of grades will be based on the following criteria:

 

Grade

 

Pass (P)

A minimum mark of 50% in the neuroscience and technique practical

components PLUS a minimum total raw mark of 50%

Credit (Cr)

A minimum mark of 50% in the neuroscience and technique practical

components PLUS a minimum total raw mark of 65%

Distinction (D)

A minimum mark of 50% in the neuroscience and technique practical

components PLUS a minimum total raw mark of 75%

High Distinction (HD)

 

A minimum mark of 50% in the neuroscience and technique practical

components PLUS a minimum total raw mark of 85%

  • Attendance is expected at lectures and tutorials. 85% attendance is the expected requirement for tutorials. Attendance will be recorded and will be taken into consideration when compiling a student’s final grade for the unit. 

  • Hurdle Requirements and Serious Attempt Defined
  • A hurdle is a passing requirement for the unit. A serious attempt is the threshold when a second chance will be provided as an opportunity to meet the hurdle requirement. CHIR603 has 2 hurdles. 
  • Hurdle 1): Neuroscience comprised of the neuro-science component of the end of semester written exam). A student must obtain 50% of the available marks in the neuro-science section of the end of semester written exam. A Serious attempt is defined as gaining a mark of 40-49% of the available marks in that exam. A Second chance is a supplementary neuro-science written exam held during the supplementary examination period.

    Hurdle 2): Chiropractic technique practicum comprised of the technique OSCE in week 13. A student must obtain 50% of the available marks in the Technique OSCE. A Serious attempt is defined as gaining a mark of 40-49% of the available marks in the technique OSCE.  A Second chance is a supplementary technique OSCE held during the written examination period. 

       

 

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Hurdle Due
Neuroscience assessment 5% Week 7
Neuroscience OSCE 15% week 13
Technique Spot Test 10% week 6
Technique OSCE 20% week 13
Technqiue video assignments 10% weeks 3, 6, 11
Written assignment 10% week 9
Wriiten examination 30% examination period

Neuroscience assessment

Due: Week 7
Weighting: 5%

Neuroscience mid-semester assessment


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • A thorough knowledge of human neuro-anatomy.

Neuroscience OSCE

Due: week 13
Weighting: 15%

Neuroscience practical exam


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • A thorough knowledge of human neuro-anatomy.

Technique Spot Test

Due: week 6
Weighting: 10%

Technique practical exam


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • The ability to perform a basic set of spinal and a full set of peripheral adjustments and/or mobilisations with a level of psychomotor skill that is appropriate for these procedures i.e. tactile/palpatory skills and hand/body/eye co-ordination of practitioner movements.
  • The ability to control these procedures with regard to patient position, practitioner position, primary contact, secondary contact, lock-up/set-up, speed, amplitude and line of drive.
  • The ability to perform basic static and motion palpation on all spinal and peripheral joints in the body.
  • A thorough knowledge of the functional anatomy of the human body including: a) A basic knowledge of the biomechanical effects of an adjustment or mobilisation and the indications for their use; b) A basic knowledge of structural analysis as it relates to posture and dysfunction; c) The ability to demonstrate an appropriate level of care in the handling of a patient; d) The ability to demonstrate motion palpation findings for spinal and peripheral joints.

Technique OSCE

Due: week 13
Weighting: 20%

Technique OSCE


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • The ability to perform a basic set of spinal and a full set of peripheral adjustments and/or mobilisations with a level of psychomotor skill that is appropriate for these procedures i.e. tactile/palpatory skills and hand/body/eye co-ordination of practitioner movements.
  • The ability to control these procedures with regard to patient position, practitioner position, primary contact, secondary contact, lock-up/set-up, speed, amplitude and line of drive.
  • The ability to perform basic static and motion palpation on all spinal and peripheral joints in the body.
  • A thorough knowledge of the functional anatomy of the human body including: a) A basic knowledge of the biomechanical effects of an adjustment or mobilisation and the indications for their use; b) A basic knowledge of structural analysis as it relates to posture and dysfunction; c) The ability to demonstrate an appropriate level of care in the handling of a patient; d) The ability to demonstrate motion palpation findings for spinal and peripheral joints.

Technqiue video assignments

Due: weeks 3, 6, 11
Weighting: 10%

Three video technique assignments


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • The ability to perform a basic set of spinal and a full set of peripheral adjustments and/or mobilisations with a level of psychomotor skill that is appropriate for these procedures i.e. tactile/palpatory skills and hand/body/eye co-ordination of practitioner movements.
  • The ability to control these procedures with regard to patient position, practitioner position, primary contact, secondary contact, lock-up/set-up, speed, amplitude and line of drive.
  • The ability to perform basic static and motion palpation on all spinal and peripheral joints in the body.
  • A thorough knowledge of the functional anatomy of the human body including: a) A basic knowledge of the biomechanical effects of an adjustment or mobilisation and the indications for their use; b) A basic knowledge of structural analysis as it relates to posture and dysfunction; c) The ability to demonstrate an appropriate level of care in the handling of a patient; d) The ability to demonstrate motion palpation findings for spinal and peripheral joints.

Written assignment

Due: week 9
Weighting: 10%

Written assignment on research methods.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • An understanding of the basic tenants underpinning modern scientific research.

Wriiten examination

Due: examination period
Weighting: 30%

End of semester written examination


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • An understanding of peripheral and spinal joint mechanics.
  • A thorough knowledge of human neuro-anatomy.
  • A thorough knowledge of the functional anatomy of the human body including: a) A basic knowledge of the biomechanical effects of an adjustment or mobilisation and the indications for their use; b) A basic knowledge of structural analysis as it relates to posture and dysfunction; c) The ability to demonstrate an appropriate level of care in the handling of a patient; d) The ability to demonstrate motion palpation findings for spinal and peripheral joints.
  • An understanding of the basic tenants underpinning modern scientific research.

Delivery and Resources

  • Number and length of classes per week:
    • 2 x 2 hour lectures
    • 1 x 1 hour lecture
    • 3 x 2 hour tutorials
    • 1 x 2 hour lab
  • The timetable for classes can be found on the University web site at:

      http://www.timetables.mq.edu.au/

  • Tutorial attendance/participation is required and will be factored into the final grade.               

Required and Recommended texts and/or materials

TEXT

  • Oatis CA. The mechanics and Pathomechanics of Human Movement. 2nd ed. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. 2009.
  • Esposito S, Philipson S. Spinal Adjustment Technique: The Chiropractic Art. Self Published. St. Ives, Australia. 2005.

 

Unit web page

The web page for this unit can be found at http://ilearn.mq.edu.au/my

Follow the links to CHIR 603. 

iLearn access to HLTH 214 and CHIR 316 are also provided to all students enrolled in CHIR 603.

All essential information that is required for this unit including lecture and tutorial notes will be posted on the iLearn web page.

 

Unit Schedule

CHIR 603 Syllabus – 2017

 

Week

Day

Topic

Lecturer

Tutorial

1

Monday

Neuroanatomy (9-10)

Neuroanatomy lab (12-2)

Hulme

Wearing

Technique

Neuro

 

Wednesday

Research methods

Downie

See CHIR 316 unit guide

 

Wednesday

Technique (3-5)

Agius/Rahme

Technique

 

Friday

Lecture (1-3)

Technique (3-5)

Agius

Technique

2

Monday

Neuroanatomy (9-10)

Neuroanatomy lab

Hulme

Wearing

Technique

Neuro

 

Wednesday

Research methods

Downie

See CHIR 316 unit guide

 

Wednesday

Technique (3-5)

Agius/Rahme

Technique

 

Friday

Technique

Agius

Technique

3

Monday

Neuroanatomy (9-10)

Neuroanatomy lab (12-2)

Hulme

Wearing

Technique

Neuro

 

Wednesday

Research methods

Downie

See CHIR 316 unit guide

 

Wednesday

Technique (3-5)

Agius/Rahme

Technique

 

Friday

Technique

Agius

Technique

4

Monday

Neuroanatomy (9-10)

Neuroanatomy lab (12-2)

Hulme

Wearing

Technique

Neuro

 

Wednesday

Research methods

Downie

See CHIR 316 unit guide

 

Wednesday

Technique (3-5)

Agius/Rahme

Technique

 

Friday

Technique

Agius

Technique

5

Monday

Neuroanatomy (9-10)

Neuroanatomy lab (12-2)

Hulme

Wearing

Technique

Neuro

 

Wednesday

Research Methods

Downie

See CHIR 316 unit guide

 

Wednesday

Technique (3-5)

Agius/Rhame

Technique

 

Friday

Technique

Agius

Technique

6

Monday

Neuroanatomy (9-10)

Neuroanatomy lab (12-2)

Hulme

Wearing

Technique

Neuro

 

Wednesday

Research Methods

Downie

See CHIR 316 unit guide

 

Wednesday

Technique (3-5)

Agius/Rahme

Technique

 

Friday

Technique

Agius

Technique SPOT TEST

7

Monday

Neuroanatomy (9-10)

Neuroanatomy lab (12-2)

Hulme

Wearing

Technique

Neuro

 

Wednesday

Research Methods

Downie

See CHIR 316 unit guide

 

Wednesday

Technique (3-5)

Agius/Rahme

Technique

 

Friday

Technique

Agius

Technique

XXX

RECESS

XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX

XXXXXXXXXX

XXXXXXXXXXXX

8

Monday

PUBLIC HOLIDAY

XXXXXXXXXXXXXX

NO LECTURE

 

Wednesday

Research Methods

Downie

See CHIR 316 unit guide

 

Wednesday

Technique (3-5)

Agius/Rahme

Technique

 

Friday

Technique

Agius

Technique

9

Monday

Neuroanatomy (9-10)

Neuroanatomy lab (12-2)

Hulme

Wearing

Technique

Neuro

 

Wednesday

Research Methods

Downie

See CHIR 316 unit guide

 

Wednesday

Technique (3-5)

Agius/Rahme

Technique

 

Friday

Technique

Agius

Technique

10

Monday

Neuroanatomy (9-10)

Neuroanatomy lab (12-2)

Hulme

Wearing

Technique

Neuro

 

Wednesday

Research Methods

Downie

See CHIR 316 unit guide

 

Wednesday

Technique (3-5)

Agius/Rahme

Technique

 

Friday

Technique

Agius

Technique

11

Monday

Neuroanatomy (9-10)

Neuroanatomy lab (12-2)

Hulme

Wearing

Technique

Neuro

 

Wednesday

Research Methods

Downie

See CHIR 316 unit guide

 

Wednesday

Technique (3-5)

Agius/Rahme

Technique

 

Friday

Technique

Agius

Technique

12

Monday

Neuroanatomy (9-10)

Neuroanatomy lab (12-2)

Hulme

Wearing

Technique

Neuro

 

Wednesday

Research Methods

Downie

See CHIR 316 unit guide

 

Wednesday

Technique (3-5)

Agius/Rahme

Technique

 

Friday

Technique

Agius

Technique

13

Monday

NO LECTURE

 

NO TUTORIAL

 

Wednesday

NO LECTURE

 

NO TUTORIAL

 

Wednesday

NO LECTURE

 

NEURO OSCE

 

Friday

NO LECTURE

 

TECHNIQUE OSCE

Policies and Procedures

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central. Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Academic Honesty Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/academic_honesty/policy.html

Assessment Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/assessment/policy_2016.html

Grade Appeal Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/gradeappeal/policy.html

Complaint Management Procedure for Students and Members of the Public http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/complaint_management/procedure.html​

Disruption to Studies Policy (in effect until Dec 4th, 2017): http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/disruption_studies/policy.html

Special Consideration Policy (in effect from Dec 4th, 2017): https://staff.mq.edu.au/work/strategy-planning-and-governance/university-policies-and-procedures/policies/special-consideration

In addition, a number of other policies can be found in the Learning and Teaching Category of Policy Central.

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/support/student_conduct/

Results

Results shown in iLearn, or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent. For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au.

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Learning Skills

Learning Skills (mq.edu.au/learningskills) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to improve your marks and take control of your study.

Student Enquiry Service

For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at ask.mq.edu.au

Equity Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

IT Help

For help with University computer systems and technology, visit http://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/information_technology/help/

When using the University's IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use of IT Resources Policy. The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network including students.

Graduate Capabilities

Discipline Specific Knowledge and Skills

Our graduates will take with them the intellectual development, depth and breadth of knowledge, scholarly understanding, and specific subject content in their chosen fields to make them competent and confident in their subject or profession. They will be able to demonstrate, where relevant, professional technical competence and meet professional standards. They will be able to articulate the structure of knowledge of their discipline, be able to adapt discipline-specific knowledge to novel situations, and be able to contribute from their discipline to inter-disciplinary solutions to problems.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • The ability to perform a basic set of spinal and a full set of peripheral adjustments and/or mobilisations with a level of psychomotor skill that is appropriate for these procedures i.e. tactile/palpatory skills and hand/body/eye co-ordination of practitioner movements.
  • The ability to control these procedures with regard to patient position, practitioner position, primary contact, secondary contact, lock-up/set-up, speed, amplitude and line of drive.
  • The ability to perform basic static and motion palpation on all spinal and peripheral joints in the body.
  • An understanding of peripheral and spinal joint mechanics.
  • A thorough knowledge of human neuro-anatomy.
  • A thorough knowledge of the functional anatomy of the human body including: a) A basic knowledge of the biomechanical effects of an adjustment or mobilisation and the indications for their use; b) A basic knowledge of structural analysis as it relates to posture and dysfunction; c) The ability to demonstrate an appropriate level of care in the handling of a patient; d) The ability to demonstrate motion palpation findings for spinal and peripheral joints.

Assessment tasks

  • Neuroscience assessment
  • Neuroscience OSCE
  • Technique Spot Test
  • Technique OSCE
  • Technqiue video assignments
  • Wriiten examination

Problem Solving and Research Capability

Our graduates should be capable of researching; of analysing, and interpreting and assessing data and information in various forms; of drawing connections across fields of knowledge; and they should be able to relate their knowledge to complex situations at work or in the world, in order to diagnose and solve problems. We want them to have the confidence to take the initiative in doing so, within an awareness of their own limitations.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • An understanding of the basic tenants underpinning modern scientific research.

Assessment tasks

  • Written assignment
  • Wriiten examination

Creative and Innovative

Our graduates will also be capable of creative thinking and of creating knowledge. They will be imaginative and open to experience and capable of innovation at work and in the community. We want them to be engaged in applying their critical, creative thinking.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • An understanding of the basic tenants underpinning modern scientific research.

Effective Communication

We want to develop in our students the ability to communicate and convey their views in forms effective with different audiences. We want our graduates to take with them the capability to read, listen, question, gather and evaluate information resources in a variety of formats, assess, write clearly, speak effectively, and to use visual communication and communication technologies as appropriate.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • The ability to perform a basic set of spinal and a full set of peripheral adjustments and/or mobilisations with a level of psychomotor skill that is appropriate for these procedures i.e. tactile/palpatory skills and hand/body/eye co-ordination of practitioner movements.
  • The ability to control these procedures with regard to patient position, practitioner position, primary contact, secondary contact, lock-up/set-up, speed, amplitude and line of drive.
  • The ability to perform basic static and motion palpation on all spinal and peripheral joints in the body.

Assessment tasks

  • Technique Spot Test
  • Technique OSCE
  • Technqiue video assignments

Capable of Professional and Personal Judgement and Initiative

We want our graduates to have emotional intelligence and sound interpersonal skills and to demonstrate discernment and common sense in their professional and personal judgement. They will exercise initiative as needed. They will be capable of risk assessment, and be able to handle ambiguity and complexity, enabling them to be adaptable in diverse and changing environments.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • The ability to perform basic static and motion palpation on all spinal and peripheral joints in the body.

Assessment tasks

  • Technique OSCE
  • Written assignment

Commitment to Continuous Learning

Our graduates will have enquiring minds and a literate curiosity which will lead them to pursue knowledge for its own sake. They will continue to pursue learning in their careers and as they participate in the world. They will be capable of reflecting on their experiences and relationships with others and the environment, learning from them, and growing - personally, professionally and socially.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • A thorough knowledge of human neuro-anatomy.
  • A thorough knowledge of the functional anatomy of the human body including: a) A basic knowledge of the biomechanical effects of an adjustment or mobilisation and the indications for their use; b) A basic knowledge of structural analysis as it relates to posture and dysfunction; c) The ability to demonstrate an appropriate level of care in the handling of a patient; d) The ability to demonstrate motion palpation findings for spinal and peripheral joints.

Assessment tasks

  • Technqiue video assignments
  • Written assignment

Critical, Analytical and Integrative Thinking

We want our graduates to be capable of reasoning, questioning and analysing, and to integrate and synthesise learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments; to be able to critique constraints, assumptions and limitations; to be able to think independently and systemically in relation to scholarly activity, in the workplace, and in the world. We want them to have a level of scientific and information technology literacy.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • An understanding of peripheral and spinal joint mechanics.
  • A thorough knowledge of the functional anatomy of the human body including: a) A basic knowledge of the biomechanical effects of an adjustment or mobilisation and the indications for their use; b) A basic knowledge of structural analysis as it relates to posture and dysfunction; c) The ability to demonstrate an appropriate level of care in the handling of a patient; d) The ability to demonstrate motion palpation findings for spinal and peripheral joints.
  • An understanding of the basic tenants underpinning modern scientific research.

Assessment tasks

  • Written assignment
  • Wriiten examination