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INED803 – Politics, Power and Indigenous Education

2017 – S2 External

General Information

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Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit Convenor
Dr Colleen McGloin
By appointment. Please email to set up a time.
Colleen McGloin
Credit points Credit points
4
Prerequisites Prerequisites
Admission to MIndigenousEd or GradDipIndigenousEd or GradCertIndigenousEd
Corequisites Corequisites
Co-badged status Co-badged status
Unit description Unit description
This unit examines how politics, power and colonialism have impacted on Indigenous Australians and education. Various pieces of government legislation and practices will be critically analysed.

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at http://students.mq.edu.au/student_admin/enrolmentguide/academicdates/

Learning Outcomes

  1. Explain how government policy and legislation has impacted on Indigenous Australians socially, economically, and politically
  2. Examine the implications that colonialism has had on Indigenous Australian people’s rights to education
  3. Effectively utilise theories of power to analyse the impact of politics on Indigenous Australians
  4. Critically analyse the political positions of historical and contemporary texts. Demonstrate advanced communication skills to be able to provide an informed response to such material
  5. Critically engage with the perspectives of the other students using the prescribed online technology

General Assessment Information

General Assessment Information

Marking criteria: The criteria and standards by which your work will be assessed will be available in the ilearn site.

Submitting your work: Each assessment task is to be submitted online.

Extensions will only be granted in exceptional circumstances, and will require documentary evidence such as a medical certificate to support the request for an extension. You should contact the convener as early as possible if you think you may need an extension.

Penalties for late submission: Late submissions for the online discussion activity will not be accepted without documentary evidence.  Late essay submissions which are submitted after the due date, without having an extension granted by the convener, will be penalised, by 3 marks a day for each day after the due date. Any paper submitted more than 3 weeks after the due date will not be marked, and the student will be failed for the assignment.

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Hurdle Due
Weekly online activity 40% No Sunday of each week
Short essay 25% No 22 September
Research essay 35% No 10 November

Weekly online activity

Due: Sunday of each week
Weighting: 40%

 At the beginning of each week, the subject coordinator will identify a point/argument  in one of the readings and put this on the forum as a quotation - the reading will not be disclosed so you will need to do all of the readings in order to complete this exercise.  Your task is to provide a weekly post that responds to the quote/points selected by the convener.  Give each of your posts post the heading "Weekly Post" along with your name and the date of submission. You can either engage directly with the quote,  or discuss it with another student on the forum by commenting on their post.   Your assessment task post must be as close to 250 words as possible - check your word count before posting.  As well as your official  assessment task post, you are encouraged to comment and contribute to the discussion informally so we can generate a good lively debate!   Your assessment task post must be written in academic prose (e.g. correct grammar, punctuation, expression will be expected)  and must show scholarly engagement with the concept/s and/or the student with whom you choose to discuss.   Each weekly response will be marked out of 10. Marks will be recorded by the convener each week and final marks for the completed exercise allocated to students at the end of semester..  If students have not posted by the due time and day each week, they will be given a grade of zero for that week.

Note: It is imperative that the response be provided by Sunday 5pm of each week.

Details of the online activities are posted under each weekly topic on iLearn. You will be able to see the answers provided by other students only after you have posted your response (note: there may be a 15 minute ‘turnover’ time). 


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Explain how government policy and legislation has impacted on Indigenous Australians socially, economically, and politically
  • Examine the implications that colonialism has had on Indigenous Australian people’s rights to education
  • Critically analyse the political positions of historical and contemporary texts. Demonstrate advanced communication skills to be able to provide an informed response to such material
  • Critically engage with the perspectives of the other students using the prescribed online technology

Short essay

Due: 22 September
Weighting: 25%

The second assessment requires students to write a short essay from one of the three topics below. You are expected to draw material from modules 1, 2 and 3 as you write the essay and also, to demonstrate wider research.. 

1. Choose one of the following broad topics:

  • A key moment in Indigenous political history, or
  • A high-profile Indigenous political campaign, or
  • A prominent Indigenous leader and her/his effects on the political landscape. Your chosen subject can be in the present day, or in the past.

Make sure you choose a subject which is manageable within the constraints set out below.

2. In reflecting on your chosen subject, consider the ways in which power has been exercised and by whom. What obstacles were overcome, and how? What tactics were used, and how successful were they? What important lessons can we learn from your chosen subject?

3. Full academic referencing is required (in-text referencing is preferred) and you should include a bibliography.  An abstract is not required for this essay.

4. Give your essay a title denoting the chosen topic.  At this level, it is expected that academic prose comprises correct grammar, referencing, sentence structure, punctuation, page numbers, flow of argument/points etc and general high level essay writing skills 


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Explain how government policy and legislation has impacted on Indigenous Australians socially, economically, and politically
  • Examine the implications that colonialism has had on Indigenous Australian people’s rights to education
  • Effectively utilise theories of power to analyse the impact of politics on Indigenous Australians
  • Critically analyse the political positions of historical and contemporary texts. Demonstrate advanced communication skills to be able to provide an informed response to such material

Research essay

Due: 10 November
Weighting: 35%

The final assessment requires students to conduct extensive independent research and present their findings in essay form. Students will identify a government policy related to Indigenous education which has been formulated and implemented by either the Commonwealth government, or by a state or territory government in Australia.

Note: You should have chosen your policy by week 8 and begun to gather appropriate research in preparation for this task. 

In your essay, you should do the following things:

1. Describe and give some backdrop for the political context in which the policy was formulated. 

2. You could consider the following questions, as appropriate:

  •  How did the issue reach the policy agenda?
  •  How was the policy problem framed?
  •  Which actors were most influential in the policy process?
  •  What role did Indigenous people have in the consultation process and/or policy-making process and the policy's implementation?

3. Consider how could the policy be evaluated, in your view? Has it been a success or a failure? Give reasons/evidence for your answer. 


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Explain how government policy and legislation has impacted on Indigenous Australians socially, economically, and politically
  • Effectively utilise theories of power to analyse the impact of politics on Indigenous Australians
  • Critically analyse the political positions of historical and contemporary texts. Demonstrate advanced communication skills to be able to provide an informed response to such material

Delivery and Resources

This unit is taught externally. This unit has an unit webpage which is accessible only to currently enrolled students. Online units can be accessed at: http://ilearn.mq.edu.au

Lectures will be recorded weekly and available for download.

All required readings are available via e-Reserve through the library website, here: http://multisearch.mq.edu.au/primo_library/libweb/action/dlSearch.do?vid=MQ&institution=MQ&tab=reserve_collection&bulkSize=20&loc=adaptor,scope:(reserve)&pcAvailabiltyMode=false&query=any,contains,INED803.

Direct links and details are provided on iLearn

List of weekly readings

Week 1

Required Reading:

Ariadne Vromen, Katharine Gelber and Anika Gauja (2009) “Power and Politics” in Powerscape: Contemporary Australian Politics, Allen and Unwin

Jane Robbins and John Summers (2010) “Indigenous affairs policy” in Dennis Woodward, Andrew Parkin and John Summers (eds)Government, Politics, Power and Policy in Australia, Pearson

Additional reading:

Tess Lea (2008) “Encountering” in Bureaucrats and Bleeding Hearts: Indigenous Health in Northern Australia, UNSW Press

Week 2

Required reading:

Richard Broome (2010) “Resisting the invaders” in Aboriginal Australians: A History since 1788, 4th ed., Allen and Unwin

Heather Goodall (1996) “The Aborigines Protection Board” and “Escalating Pressures” in Invasion to Embassy: Land in Aboriginal Politics in New South Wales 1770-1972, Allen and Unwin

Tim Rowse (1998) “Settlements and Families”  in White Flour, White Power: From Rations to Citizenship in Central Australia, Cambridge University Press

Additional reading:

WEH Stanner  (1968) “The Great Australian Silence” (Extract from The Boyer Lectures: After the Dreaming) in Robert Manne (ed) (2010)WEH Stanner: The Dreaming and other essays, Black Inc

Paul Keating (1992) “The Redfern Park Speech” in Michelle Grattan (ed) (2000) Reconciliation: Essays on Australian Reconciliation, Black Inc Melbourne (A version of this, including audio and links to video, is also available at http://australianpolitics.com/1992/12/10/paul-keatings-redfern-speech.html)

Sarah Maddison “History and Identity: What we lose by denying our past” in Beyond White Guilt: The real challenge for black-white relations in Australia,  Allen and Unwin

ABC Radio National (2007) “Remote – Aboriginal communities in the bush”, Rear Vision, 1 July, at www.abc.net.au/rn/rearvision/stories/2007/1963077.htm  

Coral Dow and John Gardiner-Garden (2011) “Overview of Indigenous Affairs Part 1: 1901-1991”, Parliamentary Library Background Note 10 May, at http://www.aph.gov.au/About_Parliament/Parliamentary_Departments/Parliamentary_Library/pubs/BN/1011/IndigenousAffairs1

Week 3

Required reading:

John Gardiner-Garden (2007) “The 1967 Referendum – History and Myths”, Parliamentary Library Research Brief No. 11, 2006-07 at www.aph.gov.au 

Russell McGregor (2011) “After the Referendum” in Indifferent Inclusion: Aboriginal People and the Australian Nation, Aboriginal Studies Press

Alissa Macoun (2011) “Aboriginality and the Northern Territory Intervention”, Australian Journal of Political Science, 46 (3) 519-534

Additional reading:

Tim Rowse (2000) "The modest mandate of 1967", Chapter 1 in Obliged to be Difficult: Nugget Coombs' Legacy in Indigenous Affairs, Cambridge University Press pages 17-33

Stuart Bradfield (2006) “Separatism or Status Quo? Indigenous Affairs from the Birth of Land Rights to the Death of ATSIC”, Australian Journal of Politics and History, 52(1) 80-97

John Howard, “Practical Reconciliation” in Michelle Grattan (ed) (2000) Reconciliation: Essays on Australian Reconciliation, Black Inc Melbourne (an abridged version of this speech is also available at http://australianpolitics.com/2000/05/27/john-howard-address-to-corroboree-2000.html )

Kevin Rudd (2008) “Apology to Australia’s Indigenous Peoples”, 13 February, House of Representatives, Hansard pp 167-171, available at http://parlinfo.aph.gov.au/parlInfo/genpdf/chamber/hansardr/2008-02-13/0003/hansard_frag.pdf;fileType=application%2Fpdf

Bain Attwood and Andrew Markus (2007) “The poll and its consequences” in The 1967 Referendum: Race, Power and the Australian Constitution, 2nd ed, Aboriginal Studies Press

Week 4

Required reading:

Sarah Maddison (2010) “White Parliament, Black Politics: The Dilemmas of Indigenous Parliamentary Representation”, Australian Journal of Political Science 45(4) 663-680

Thalia Anthony (2010) “A New National Indigenous Representative Body... Again” Indigenous Law Bulletin 7(18) 5-9

National Congress of Australia’s First Peoples (2011) “What is the National Congress? Fact Sheet”, available at http://nationalcongress.com.au/about-us/

Patrick Sullivan (2011) “Accountability and Government/Citizen Relations” in Belonging Together: Dealing with the politics of disenchantment in Australian Indigenous policy, Aboriginal Studies Press, Canberra  

Additional reading:

Australian Electoral Commission (2011) “Electoral milestones – Timetable for Indigenous Australians” at http://www.aec.gov.au/Voting/indigenous_vote/indigenous.htm  

You Me Unity (2011) “A National Conversation about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Constitutional Recognition: Discussion Paper”, available at http://www.recognise.org.au/wp-content/uploads/shared/downloads/2653fb1b6a59a1ab8d18.pdf

Michael A Murphy (2008) “Representing Indigenous Self-Determination”, University of Toronto Law Journal  58 (185-216)

Week 5

Required reading:

Verity Burgmann (2003) “The Aboriginal Movement” in Power, profit and protest: Australian social movements and globalisation, Allen and Unwin, Crows Nest

Marcia Langton (2008) “Trapped in the Aboriginal reality show”, Griffith Review: Re-imagining Australia, Autumn, 143-162

Kerry McCallum and Lisa Waller (2012) “Managing the optics of the Intervention”, Inside Story 22 June, at http://inside.org.au/managing-the-optics-of-the-intervention/   

Dennis Foley (2010) “Can we educate and train Aboriginal leaders within our tertiary education systems?” Australian Journal of Indigenous Education 39, 138-150

Additional reading:

Garry Foley (2011) “Black Power, land rights and Aboriginal history”, Griffith Law Review 20(3) 608-618

Peter Buckskin (2009) “Hawke and Ryan: An acceleration of Indigenous education policy” in Gerry Bloustein, Barbara Comber and Alison Mackinnon (eds) The Hawke Legacy, Wakefield Press

Tim Rowse (2010) “The Reforming State, the Concerned Public and Indigenous Political Actors”, Australian Journal of Politics and History 56 (1) 66-81

Week 6

Required reading:

Alan Fenna (2004) "The role of the state: Ideological perspectives", Chapter 2 in Australian Public Policy, 2nd ed, Pearson Longman, pp36-70

Will Sanders (2010) "Ideology, evidence and competing principles in Australian Indigenous affairs: From Brough to Rudd via Pearson and the NTER", Australian Journal of Social Issues 45(3) 307-331

Noel Pearson (2009) “Our Right to take Responsibility” in Up from the Mission: Selected Writings, Black Inc Melbourne

Additional reading:

Will Sanders (2008) “Equality and Difference Arguments in Australian Indigenous Affairs: examples from income support and housing”, Public Policy 3(1) 87-99

Boyd Hunter (2007) “Conspicuous compassion and wicked problems: the Howard Government’s national Emergency in Indigenous Affairs”,Agenda 14(3) 35-51 at http://epress.anu.edu.au/wp-content/uploads/2011/06/14-3-A-1.pdf  

Darryl Cronin (2007) “Welfare dependency and mutual obligation: Negating Indigenous sovereignty” in Aileen Moreton-Robinson (ed)Sovereign Subjects: Indigenous Sovereignty Matters, Allen and Unwin

Sarah Maddison and Richard Denniss (2009) “State or Market 1: Ideology and Public Policy” in An Introduction to Australian Public Policy: Theory and Practice, Cambridge University Press

Week 7

Required reading:

Catherine Althaus, Peter Bridgman and Glyn Davis (2009) “A Policy Cycle” in The Australian Policy Handbook, 4th ed, Allen and Unwin (other editions also suitable)

Tom Calma (2007) “What makes good Indigenous policy?”, Speech to IQPC Annual Conference, 1 May, available at http://pandora.nla.gov.au/pan/60441/20070703-0431/www.hreoc.gov.au/speeches/social_justice/2007/iqpc_6thconf_1may06.html

Larissa Behrendt (2012) “Avoiding an era of symbolism in Indigenous Affairs” in Antony Loewenstein and Jeff Sparrow (eds) Left Turn: Political essays for the New Left, Melbourne University Press

Toni Bauman (2007) “You mob all agree? The Chronic Emergency of Culturally Competent Engaged Indigenous Problem Solving”,Indigenous Law Bulletin 6 (29) 13-15

Additional reading:

Claudia Scott and Karen Baehler (2010) "All about policy", Chapter 1 in Adding Value to Policy Analysis and Advice, UNSW Press, pages 9-41

Jan Gray and Quentin Beresford (2008) “A ‘formidable challenge’: Australia’s quest for equity in Indigenous education”, Australian Journal of Education 52(2) 197-223

Pat Dodson (2008) “Reconciliation” in Robert Manne (ed) Dear Mr Rudd: Ideas for a Better Australia, Black Inc Melbourne

Week 8

Required reading:

Sarah Maddison (2009) “A history of policy failure” in Black Politics: Inside the complexity of Aboriginal political culture, Allen and Unwin

Will Sanders (2008) “In the name of failure: A generational revolution in Indigenous affairs” in Chris Aulich and Roger Wettenhall (eds)Howard’s Fourth Government: Australian Commonwealth Administration 2004-2007, UNSW Press

Janet Hunt (2008) “Failure, Evidence and New Ideas”, Canberra Times 29 February, available at http://caepr.anu.edu.au/sites/default/files/Publications/topical/Hunt_Ideas.pdf

Additional reading:

Michael C Dillon and Neil D Westbury (2007) “The Institutional Determinants of Government Failure in Indigenous Affairs” in Beyond Humbug: Transforming government engagement with Indigenous Australia, Seaview Press, West Lakes

Helen Harper et al. (2012) “ABRACADABRA for magic under which conditions? Case studies of a web-based literacy intervention in the Northern Territory” Australian Journal of Language and Literacy 35(1) 33-50

Week 9

Required reading:

Gary Banks (2009) “Are we overcoming Indigenous disadvantage?”, Lecture in Reconciliation Australia’s ‘Closing the Gap’ series, available at http://www.pc.gov.au/news-media/speeches/cs20090707-overcoming-indigenous-disadvantage/cs20090707.pdf

Boyd Hunter (2009) “Indigenous social exclusion: Insights and challenges for the concept of social inclusion”, Family Matters (Journal of the Australian Institute of Family Studies) 82, 52-61 (see PDF below)

Terry Dunbar and Margaret Scrimgeour (2007) “Education” in Bronwyn Carson, Terry Dunbar, Richard Chenhall and Ross Bailie (eds) Social Determinants of Indigenous Health, Allen and Unwin

Additional reading:

Steering Committee for the Review of Government Service Provision (SCRGSP) (2011) Overcoming Indigenous Disadvantage: Key Indicators 2011, Productivity Commission available at http://www.pc.gov.au/research/ongoing/overcoming-indigenous-disadvantage/key-indicators-2011

Steering Committee for the Review of Government Service Provision (SCRGSP) (2014) Overcoming Indigenous Disadvantage: Key Indicators 2014, Productivity Commission available at http://www.pc.gov.au/research/ongoing/overcoming-indigenous-disadvantage/key-indicators-2014#thereport

Zaza Lyons and Aleksandar Janca (2012) “Indigenous children in Australia: Health, education and optimism for the future”, Australian Journal of Education 56(1) 5-21

Boyd Hunter and Kirrily Jordan (2010) “Explaining social exclusion: Towards social inclusion for Indigenous Australians”, Australian Journal of Social Issues 45(2) 243-265

Janet Hunt (2010) “Missed opportunity: The NTER and sustainable development outcomes for Aboriginal people in the Northern Territory”,Australian Journal of Social Issues 45(3) 417-431

Week 10

Required readings:

JC Altman (2009) “Beyond Closing the Gap: Valuing Diversity in Indigenous Australia”, CAEPR Working Paper No. 54, available at http://caepr.anu.edu.au/sites/default/files/Publications/WP/CAEPRWP54.pdf

Kirrily Jordan, Hannah Bulloch and Geoff Buchanan (2010) “Statistical Equality and Cultural Difference in Indigenous Wellbeing Frameworks: A new expression of an enduring debate” Australian Journal of Social Issues 45(3) 333-362 

Rosalind Kitson and Jennifer Bowes (2010) “Incorporating Indigenous ways of knowing in early education for Indigenous children”, Australasian Journal of Early Childhood 35(4) 81-89 (PDF below)

Additional reading:

Kerryn Pholi, Dan Black and Craig Richards (2009) “Is ‘Close the Gap’ a useful approach to improving the health and wellbeing of Indigenous Australians?” Australian Review of Public Affairs 9(2) 1-13 at http://www.flinders.edu.au/medicine/fms/sites/southgate_old/documents/journal%20club/2011/Articles/Pholi%20-%20Is%20Close%20the%20gap%20a%20useful%20approach.pdf

Julia Gillard PM (2012) Prime Ministerial Statement: “Closing the Gap”, 15 February 2012, at http://webarchive.nla.gov.au/gov/20140803084214/http://pmtranscripts.dpmc.gov.au/browse.php?did=18388

Julia Gillard PM (2012) Closing the Gap: Prime Minister's Report at http://webarchive.nla.gov.au/gov/20120317053118/http://www.fahcsia.gov.au/sa/indigenous/pubs/closing_the_gap/Pages/ctg_pm_report_2012.aspx

Tony Abbott PM (2014) Closing the Gap: Prime Minister's Report, at http://www.dpmc.gov.au/resource-centre/indigenous-affairs/closing-gap-prime-ministers-report-2014

Tony Abbott PM (2015) Closing the Gap: Prime Minister's Report, at http://www.dpmc.gov.au/resource-centre/indigenous-affairs/closing-gap-prime-ministers-report-2015

Malcolm Turnbull PM (2016) Closing the Gap - Prime Minister's Report 2016, available at http://www.dpmc.gov.au/resource-centre/indigenous-affairs/closing-gap-prime-ministers-report-2016

Week 11

Required readings:

Brian Devlin (2011) “The status and future of bilingual education for remote Indigenous students in the Northern Territory”, Australian Review of Applied Linguistics 34(3) 260-279

http://pandora.nla.gov.au/pan/60141/20160322-1453/www.nla.gov.au/openpublish/index.php/aral/article/viewFile/2277/2738html.html

Tom Calma (2008) “Sustaining Indigenous Education, Language and Culture”, Public Administration Today, No 17, Oct-Dec, 17-23, 32

David P Wilkins (2008) “W(h)ither language, culture and education in remote Indigenous communities in the Northern Territory?”, Australian Review of Public Affairs, at http://pandora.nla.gov.au/pan/45089/20090206-0144/www.australianreview.net/digest/2008/10/wilkins.html

Additional reading:

Graham McKay (2011) “Policy and Indigenous Languages in Australia”, Australian Review of Applied Linguistics 34(3) 297-319

Gillian Wigglesworth, Jane Simpson and Deborah Loakes (2011) “NAPLAN language assessments for Indigenous children in remote communities: Issues and problems”, Australian Review of Applied Linguistics 34(3) 320-343

Brian Devlin (2011) “A bilingual education policy issue: Biliteracy versus English-only literacy” in Nola Purdie, Gine Milgate and Hannah Rachel Bell (eds) Two Way Teaching and Learning: Toward Culturally Reflective and Relevant Education, ACER Press

Week 12

Required reading:

Sarah Prout (2009) “Policy, practice and the ‘revolving classroom door’: Examining the relationship between Aboriginal spatiality and the mainstream education system”, Australian Journal of Education 53(1) 39-53

Tess Lea, Helen Thompson, Eva McRae-Williams and Aggie Wegner (2011) “Policy fuzz and fuzzy logic: researching contemporary Indigenous education and parent-school engagement in north Australia”,  Journal of Education Policy 26(3) 321-339

Chris Sarra (2011) “Fixing student attendance without cutting welfare payments: a much cheaper, more effective way” (Video blog post) at http://chrissarra.wordpress.com/2011/12/02/fixing-student-attendance-without-cutting-welfare-payments-a-much-cheaper-more-effective-way  

Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet (DPMC) (2014) Improving School Enrolment and Attendance through Welfare Reform Measure (SEAM), website at https://www.dpmc.gov.au/indigenous-affairs/education/school-enrolment-and-attendance-measure

Current NT Government school attendance policies:

https://education.nt.gov.au/policies/attendance

Additional reading:

Chris Sarra (2011) “Transforming Indigenous education” in Nola Purdie, Gine Milgate and Hannah Rachel Bell (eds) Two Way Teaching and Learning: Toward Culturally Reflective and Relevant Education, ACER Press

Zane Ma Rhea (2012) “Partnership for improving outcomes in Indigenous education: relationship or business?” Journal of Education Policy 27(1) 45-66

Unit Schedule

Week 1: Politics and Power

Week 2: History - Invasion, Protection, Assimilation

Week 3: History - Referendum to Intervention

Week 4: Power and political representation

Week 5: Activism and leadership

Week 6: Power and Ideology

Week 7: Making (Indigenous) policy

Week 8: Policy Failure? Implementing and Evaluating Indigenous Policy

Week 9: Overcoming Indigenous disadvantage with education?

Week 10: "Closing the Gap"

Week 11: Case study - Bilingualism in the Northern Territory

Week 12: Case Study - School Attendance

Week 13: Conclusion

Policies and Procedures

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central. Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Academic Honesty Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/academic_honesty/policy.html

Assessment Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/assessment/policy_2016.html

Grade Appeal Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/gradeappeal/policy.html

Complaint Management Procedure for Students and Members of the Public http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/complaint_management/procedure.html​

Disruption to Studies Policy (in effect until Dec 4th, 2017): http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/disruption_studies/policy.html

Special Consideration Policy (in effect from Dec 4th, 2017): https://staff.mq.edu.au/work/strategy-planning-and-governance/university-policies-and-procedures/policies/special-consideration

In addition, a number of other policies can be found in the Learning and Teaching Category of Policy Central.

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/support/student_conduct/

Results

Results shown in iLearn, or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent. For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au.

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Learning Skills

Learning Skills (mq.edu.au/learningskills) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to improve your marks and take control of your study.

Student Enquiry Service

For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at ask.mq.edu.au

Equity Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

IT Help

For help with University computer systems and technology, visit http://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/information_technology/help/

When using the University's IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use of IT Resources Policy. The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network including students.

Graduate Capabilities

PG - Discipline Knowledge and Skills

Our postgraduates will be able to demonstrate a significantly enhanced depth and breadth of knowledge, scholarly understanding, and specific subject content knowledge in their chosen fields.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Explain how government policy and legislation has impacted on Indigenous Australians socially, economically, and politically
  • Examine the implications that colonialism has had on Indigenous Australian people’s rights to education
  • Effectively utilise theories of power to analyse the impact of politics on Indigenous Australians
  • Critically analyse the political positions of historical and contemporary texts. Demonstrate advanced communication skills to be able to provide an informed response to such material
  • Critically engage with the perspectives of the other students using the prescribed online technology

Assessment tasks

  • Weekly online activity
  • Short essay
  • Research essay

PG - Critical, Analytical and Integrative Thinking

Our postgraduates will be capable of utilising and reflecting on prior knowledge and experience, of applying higher level critical thinking skills, and of integrating and synthesising learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments. A characteristic of this form of thinking is the generation of new, professionally oriented knowledge through personal or group-based critique of practice and theory.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Examine the implications that colonialism has had on Indigenous Australian people’s rights to education
  • Effectively utilise theories of power to analyse the impact of politics on Indigenous Australians
  • Critically analyse the political positions of historical and contemporary texts. Demonstrate advanced communication skills to be able to provide an informed response to such material
  • Critically engage with the perspectives of the other students using the prescribed online technology

Assessment tasks

  • Weekly online activity
  • Short essay
  • Research essay

PG - Research and Problem Solving Capability

Our postgraduates will be capable of systematic enquiry; able to use research skills to create new knowledge that can be applied to real world issues, or contribute to a field of study or practice to enhance society. They will be capable of creative questioning, problem finding and problem solving.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Effectively utilise theories of power to analyse the impact of politics on Indigenous Australians
  • Critically analyse the political positions of historical and contemporary texts. Demonstrate advanced communication skills to be able to provide an informed response to such material

Assessment tasks

  • Weekly online activity
  • Short essay
  • Research essay

PG - Effective Communication

Our postgraduates will be able to communicate effectively and convey their views to different social, cultural, and professional audiences. They will be able to use a variety of technologically supported media to communicate with empathy using a range of written, spoken or visual formats.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Examine the implications that colonialism has had on Indigenous Australian people’s rights to education
  • Critically engage with the perspectives of the other students using the prescribed online technology

Assessment tasks

  • Weekly online activity
  • Short essay

PG - Engaged and Responsible, Active and Ethical Citizens

Our postgraduates will be ethically aware and capable of confident transformative action in relation to their professional responsibilities and the wider community. They will have a sense of connectedness with others and country and have a sense of mutual obligation. They will be able to appreciate the impact of their professional roles for social justice and inclusion related to national and global issues

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Explain how government policy and legislation has impacted on Indigenous Australians socially, economically, and politically
  • Critically engage with the perspectives of the other students using the prescribed online technology

Assessment tasks

  • Weekly online activity
  • Research essay

PG - Capable of Professional and Personal Judgment and Initiative

Our postgraduates will demonstrate a high standard of discernment and common sense in their professional and personal judgment. They will have the ability to make informed choices and decisions that reflect both the nature of their professional work and their personal perspectives.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • Critically engage with the perspectives of the other students using the prescribed online technology

Assessment task

  • Weekly online activity