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BIOL242 – Marine Environmental Issues

2017 – S1 Day

General Information

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Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff Tutor
Dominic McAfee
Tutor
Gabriel Dominguez Sarmiento
Unit Convenor
Kathryn Korbel
Contact via kathryn.korbel@mq.edu.au
E8A142
Scientific officer/ Fieldwork
Nick Harris
Contact via 98504078
E8A 106
Tutor
Ingrid Errington
Credit points Credit points
3
Prerequisites Prerequisites
(3cp from MATH or STAT units at 100 level) and (6cp from BIOL114 or BIOL115 or BIOL116 or BIOL121 or ENVE117 or ENVS117)
Corequisites Corequisites
Co-badged status Co-badged status
Unit description Unit description
The marine environment is vitally important to humankind. It provides us with food and energy, it serves as a major transportation route, it performs critical roles in nutrient and carbon cycling and is of high recreational value. Overfishing, pollution, habitat damage, invasive species, and climate change are, however, increasingly eroding these important values of marine ecosystems. Because human communities are tightly coupled to coastal marine resources, understanding pathways to sustainability requires understanding as much about humans as about the ocean. In this unit, we will explore factors that contribute to the sustainability and resilience of marine ecosystems and the human communities that depend upon them. We will do so through a series of case studies on topics such as: deep ocean drilling; wind and wave power generation; shoreline engineering and beach management; restoration of coastal wetlands for habitat and carbon values; marine debris; and fisheries and aquaculture.

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at http://students.mq.edu.au/student_admin/enrolmentguide/academicdates/

Learning Outcomes

  1. 1. Identify the key goods and services provided to humans by marine ecosystems, and explain how these are maintained by physical, chemical, geological and biological processes.
  2. 2. Compare and contrast how human activities have historically, are presently and are predicted to in the future modify marine ecosystems and their provision of goods and services.
  3. 3. Compare how different stakeholder groups value marine environments, and identify and explain scenarios under which conflict among these groups might arise.
  4. 4. Explain contemporary and historical approaches to managing marine ecosystems.
  5. 5. Present a clear and scientifically accurate argument to a general audience regarding the need for restoration and conservation of marine habitats.
  6. 6. Develop and test hypotheses regarding human impacts to marine ecosystems.
  7. 7. Critically evaluate peer-reviewed, grey and popular literature on marine ecosystems, their use and management, and integrate information from these sources in written form.

General Assessment Information

Attendance for the entirety of the field trip and each of the 5 practicals is compulsory.

 

Assessment submission

Submissions of all assessments for this unit will be electronic.

1. For the Journal of learning (x 10) posts:

  • You will be required to publish your assessment on iLearn database. You will be provided with instructions on publish these at the start of semester. For each of these assessments you will also be required to cut and paste your text into a Word document and submit this to turnitin via the unit’s iLearn site for plagiarism detection. We will streamline plagiarism checks of the weekly Journal of Learning Posts by submitting these to turnitin in two batches: a single document, containing the text of posts from week 4-8 posts will be submitted in week 8; in week 13, a single document with text from the week 9-13 posts will be submitted.

2. The practical report will be submitted to turnitin via the unit’s iLearn site.

3. The graphs should be uploaded to the assessment folder, clearly marked ‘graphs’ in iLearn.​

Turnitin is a powerful online tool for the detection of plagiarism. It works by comparing the text of a submitted document (i.e., your assignment) with the work of your current classmates, other courses at Macquarie, as well as published material in books, journals and on the web.

To submit your assignment via turnitin:

Visit the Assessments tab in iLearn, look for the turnitin header and select the relevant assessment item (Practical Report or Field Trip Report).

  1. Click on the Submit Paper tab.
  2. Select Student Name of the student who you are submitting on behalf of.
  3. Enter a Submission Title.
  4. Select Submission Part if there are multiple parts available.
  5. Click Browse and select the file you would like to submit.
  6. Click Add Submission.

 

Extensions, penalties and Disruptions to Studies

The deadlines for assignments are not negotiable. If an assignment is submitted late a penalty of -10% of the mark allocated for the assignment will be deducted per day that any work is submitted late (i.e. 5 days late = -50% of marks available).

If you experience a serious and unavoidable disruption to your studies and require an extension for an assessment please submit a Disruptions to Studies notification via ask.mq.edu.au with supporting documentation, and a Professional Authority Form completed by your health care professional. If you anticipate a potentially serious and unavoidable disruption (e.g. upcoming surgery) speak to the unit convenor early and apply for an extension before the due date.

If you apply for Disruption to Study for your final examination, you must make  yourself available for the week of July 24 – 28, 2017 to sit a supplementary exam. If you are not available at that time, there is no guarantee an additional examination time will be offered. Specific examination dates and times will be determined at a later date.

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Hurdle Due
Graphs 15% 1 week after each prac
Journal of Learning 30% weeks 4-13
Field Trip Report 25% 7/04/16
Final exam 30% Exam period

Graphs

Due: 1 week after each prac
Weighting: 15%

During the semester, you will complete five practicals. Following each, you will be required to produce a single graph (the format and subject of which will be explained in the practical class), to be submitted by midnight the Friday following each practical class:

 

  • Introduction / WHS brief – due 10 March
  • Snorkelling practical in MQ pool – due 17 March
  • Using Google Earth to explore patterns of seagrass loss – due 7 April
  • Mangrove fieldwork –due 19 May
  • Exploring the deep sea using photo and video analysis – to be confirmed potentially 9 June

This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • 6. Develop and test hypotheses regarding human impacts to marine ecosystems.

Journal of Learning

Due: weeks 4-13
Weighting: 30%

Each week, you will work through on-line activities prior to your tutorial. Activities in weeks 4-13 will require that you document learning activities in a weekly blog that is submitted as a single post, by 8 am the morning of your tutorial (i.e. Monday or Thursday). 


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • 1. Identify the key goods and services provided to humans by marine ecosystems, and explain how these are maintained by physical, chemical, geological and biological processes.
  • 2. Compare and contrast how human activities have historically, are presently and are predicted to in the future modify marine ecosystems and their provision of goods and services.
  • 3. Compare how different stakeholder groups value marine environments, and identify and explain scenarios under which conflict among these groups might arise.
  • 4. Explain contemporary and historical approaches to managing marine ecosystems.
  • 5. Present a clear and scientifically accurate argument to a general audience regarding the need for restoration and conservation of marine habitats.
  • 7. Critically evaluate peer-reviewed, grey and popular literature on marine ecosystems, their use and management, and integrate information from these sources in written form.

Field Trip Report

Due: 7/04/16
Weighting: 25%

On the field trip we will test hypotheses about how groynes directly and indirectly modify marine ecosystems. You will write a report on data acquired during the field-trip, in the style of an article for the journal, Marine and Freshwater Research.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • 6. Develop and test hypotheses regarding human impacts to marine ecosystems.
  • 7. Critically evaluate peer-reviewed, grey and popular literature on marine ecosystems, their use and management, and integrate information from these sources in written form.

Final exam

Due: Exam period
Weighting: 30%

You will apply concepts introduced during this course to solve a variety of problems. You will be asked to interpret data of the type collected during this course.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • 1. Identify the key goods and services provided to humans by marine ecosystems, and explain how these are maintained by physical, chemical, geological and biological processes.
  • 2. Compare and contrast how human activities have historically, are presently and are predicted to in the future modify marine ecosystems and their provision of goods and services.
  • 3. Compare how different stakeholder groups value marine environments, and identify and explain scenarios under which conflict among these groups might arise.
  • 4. Explain contemporary and historical approaches to managing marine ecosystems.
  • 6. Develop and test hypotheses regarding human impacts to marine ecosystems.

Delivery and Resources

In this unit we have replaced lectures with online activities and tutorials. Each week you will:

  • Complete an on-line module in iLearn (with a blog documenting learning activities posted by 8 am Monday or Thursday, each week- dependent on tutorial day). This should take you ~3 hrs to complete.
  • Attend a compulsory 3 hr tutorial where we will engage in roll-play activities and discussion to further unpack some of the topics.

In addition, each student will complete five practicals during the semester (the dates for these are provided later in this document) and attend a compulsory fieldtrip to Silver Beach Kurnell on Fri 24 and Sat 25 March.

  • Tutorials: Mon 12-3 pm (W6B 320) OR Thur 3 – 6 pm (C5A 315)
  • Practicals: Fri 9-11 am OR Fri 11 am – 1pm (E8A 150 or field; weeks 1, 2, 6, 9) and week 10,11 or 13 (to be cofirmed in week 1)
  • Field trip: Fri 24 – Sat 25 March

 

Required and recommended texts and/or materials

There is no prescribed text book for this course. Instead, you will be directed to required and optional readings through the learning modules in iLearn. Throughout this unit, you are encouraged to keep track of contemporary issues in the marine environment by reading newspaper, listening to the radio and following expert tweets.

 

Unit web page

The format of this unit requires that you complete learning modules in iLearn. Hence, it is absolutely essential that you log in on a regular basis.

To access the online unit, go to https://iLearn.mq.edu.au/login/MQ/ and type in your Macquarie OneID Username and password.

New to iLearn? You can find out more at: http://www.mq.edu.au/iLearn/student_info/

Experiencing difficulties? Visit: http://informatics.mq.edu.au/help/

Unit Schedule

The topics we will cover, and the corresponding dates of tutorials, are listed below. It is absolutely essential that you turn up to tutorials having completed the online module first. The Journal of Learning is due by 8am Monday morning for those in the Monday tutorials and 8 am Friday morning for this in the Friday tutorials.

 

Week 1         An introduction to BIOL242

Week 2         Marine environments and their ecosystem functions

Week 3         Valuing marine ecosystems

Week 4        No tutorial due to field trip

Week 5        Recreational and commercial fisheries 

Week 6        Aquaculture 

 

MID SEMESTER RECESS

 

Week 7       Marine pollutants

Week 8       Fossil fuel formation in the marine environment

Week 9       Carbon cycling in coastal environments

Week 10     Marine renewable energy sources          

Week 11     Marine ecotourism

Week 12     Oceans and estuaries as transport routes

Week 13     Marine conservation and habitat mapping

Policies and Procedures

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central. Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Academic Honesty Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/academic_honesty/policy.html

Assessment Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/assessment/policy_2016.html

Grade Appeal Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/gradeappeal/policy.html

Complaint Management Procedure for Students and Members of the Public http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/complaint_management/procedure.html​

Disruption to Studies Policy (in effect until Dec 4th, 2017): http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/disruption_studies/policy.html

Special Consideration Policy (in effect from Dec 4th, 2017): https://staff.mq.edu.au/work/strategy-planning-and-governance/university-policies-and-procedures/policies/special-consideration

In addition, a number of other policies can be found in the Learning and Teaching Category of Policy Central.

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/support/student_conduct/

Results

Results shown in iLearn, or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent. For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au.

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Learning Skills

Learning Skills (mq.edu.au/learningskills) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to improve your marks and take control of your study.

Student Enquiry Service

For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at ask.mq.edu.au

Equity Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

IT Help

For help with University computer systems and technology, visit http://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/information_technology/help/

When using the University's IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use of IT Resources Policy. The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network including students.

Graduate Capabilities

Discipline Specific Knowledge and Skills

Our graduates will take with them the intellectual development, depth and breadth of knowledge, scholarly understanding, and specific subject content in their chosen fields to make them competent and confident in their subject or profession. They will be able to demonstrate, where relevant, professional technical competence and meet professional standards. They will be able to articulate the structure of knowledge of their discipline, be able to adapt discipline-specific knowledge to novel situations, and be able to contribute from their discipline to inter-disciplinary solutions to problems.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • 1. Identify the key goods and services provided to humans by marine ecosystems, and explain how these are maintained by physical, chemical, geological and biological processes.
  • 2. Compare and contrast how human activities have historically, are presently and are predicted to in the future modify marine ecosystems and their provision of goods and services.
  • 3. Compare how different stakeholder groups value marine environments, and identify and explain scenarios under which conflict among these groups might arise.
  • 4. Explain contemporary and historical approaches to managing marine ecosystems.
  • 5. Present a clear and scientifically accurate argument to a general audience regarding the need for restoration and conservation of marine habitats.
  • 6. Develop and test hypotheses regarding human impacts to marine ecosystems.
  • 7. Critically evaluate peer-reviewed, grey and popular literature on marine ecosystems, their use and management, and integrate information from these sources in written form.

Assessment tasks

  • Graphs
  • Journal of Learning
  • Field Trip Report
  • Final exam

Problem Solving and Research Capability

Our graduates should be capable of researching; of analysing, and interpreting and assessing data and information in various forms; of drawing connections across fields of knowledge; and they should be able to relate their knowledge to complex situations at work or in the world, in order to diagnose and solve problems. We want them to have the confidence to take the initiative in doing so, within an awareness of their own limitations.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • 6. Develop and test hypotheses regarding human impacts to marine ecosystems.

Assessment tasks

  • Graphs
  • Field Trip Report
  • Final exam

Effective Communication

We want to develop in our students the ability to communicate and convey their views in forms effective with different audiences. We want our graduates to take with them the capability to read, listen, question, gather and evaluate information resources in a variety of formats, assess, write clearly, speak effectively, and to use visual communication and communication technologies as appropriate.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • 1. Identify the key goods and services provided to humans by marine ecosystems, and explain how these are maintained by physical, chemical, geological and biological processes.
  • 5. Present a clear and scientifically accurate argument to a general audience regarding the need for restoration and conservation of marine habitats.
  • 7. Critically evaluate peer-reviewed, grey and popular literature on marine ecosystems, their use and management, and integrate information from these sources in written form.

Assessment tasks

  • Journal of Learning
  • Field Trip Report
  • Final exam

Capable of Professional and Personal Judgement and Initiative

We want our graduates to have emotional intelligence and sound interpersonal skills and to demonstrate discernment and common sense in their professional and personal judgement. They will exercise initiative as needed. They will be capable of risk assessment, and be able to handle ambiguity and complexity, enabling them to be adaptable in diverse and changing environments.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • 7. Critically evaluate peer-reviewed, grey and popular literature on marine ecosystems, their use and management, and integrate information from these sources in written form.

Assessment tasks

  • Journal of Learning
  • Field Trip Report
  • Final exam

Critical, Analytical and Integrative Thinking

We want our graduates to be capable of reasoning, questioning and analysing, and to integrate and synthesise learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments; to be able to critique constraints, assumptions and limitations; to be able to think independently and systemically in relation to scholarly activity, in the workplace, and in the world. We want them to have a level of scientific and information technology literacy.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • 1. Identify the key goods and services provided to humans by marine ecosystems, and explain how these are maintained by physical, chemical, geological and biological processes.
  • 2. Compare and contrast how human activities have historically, are presently and are predicted to in the future modify marine ecosystems and their provision of goods and services.
  • 3. Compare how different stakeholder groups value marine environments, and identify and explain scenarios under which conflict among these groups might arise.
  • 6. Develop and test hypotheses regarding human impacts to marine ecosystems.
  • 7. Critically evaluate peer-reviewed, grey and popular literature on marine ecosystems, their use and management, and integrate information from these sources in written form.

Assessment tasks

  • Graphs
  • Journal of Learning
  • Field Trip Report
  • Final exam

Creative and Innovative

Our graduates will also be capable of creative thinking and of creating knowledge. They will be imaginative and open to experience and capable of innovation at work and in the community. We want them to be engaged in applying their critical, creative thinking.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • 1. Identify the key goods and services provided to humans by marine ecosystems, and explain how these are maintained by physical, chemical, geological and biological processes.
  • 6. Develop and test hypotheses regarding human impacts to marine ecosystems.

Assessment tasks

  • Graphs
  • Journal of Learning
  • Field Trip Report
  • Final exam

Engaged and Ethical Local and Global citizens

As local citizens our graduates will be aware of indigenous perspectives and of the nation's historical context. They will be engaged with the challenges of contemporary society and with knowledge and ideas. We want our graduates to have respect for diversity, to be open-minded, sensitive to others and inclusive, and to be open to other cultures and perspectives: they should have a level of cultural literacy. Our graduates should be aware of disadvantage and social justice, and be willing to participate to help create a wiser and better society.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • 2. Compare and contrast how human activities have historically, are presently and are predicted to in the future modify marine ecosystems and their provision of goods and services.
  • 3. Compare how different stakeholder groups value marine environments, and identify and explain scenarios under which conflict among these groups might arise.
  • 4. Explain contemporary and historical approaches to managing marine ecosystems.
  • 5. Present a clear and scientifically accurate argument to a general audience regarding the need for restoration and conservation of marine habitats.

Assessment tasks

  • Journal of Learning
  • Final exam

Socially and Environmentally Active and Responsible

We want our graduates to be aware of and have respect for self and others; to be able to work with others as a leader and a team player; to have a sense of connectedness with others and country; and to have a sense of mutual obligation. Our graduates should be informed and active participants in moving society towards sustainability.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • 2. Compare and contrast how human activities have historically, are presently and are predicted to in the future modify marine ecosystems and their provision of goods and services.
  • 3. Compare how different stakeholder groups value marine environments, and identify and explain scenarios under which conflict among these groups might arise.
  • 4. Explain contemporary and historical approaches to managing marine ecosystems.
  • 5. Present a clear and scientifically accurate argument to a general audience regarding the need for restoration and conservation of marine habitats.

Assessment tasks

  • Journal of Learning
  • Final exam

Commitment to Continuous Learning

Our graduates will have enquiring minds and a literate curiosity which will lead them to pursue knowledge for its own sake. They will continue to pursue learning in their careers and as they participate in the world. They will be capable of reflecting on their experiences and relationships with others and the environment, learning from them, and growing - personally, professionally and socially.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Assessment task

  • Journal of Learning

Changes since First Published

Date Description
04/08/2017 Removal of non-teaching staff