Logo Students

ICOM818 – Asia-Pacific in a Globalised World

2017 – S1 Day

General Information

Pdf icon Download as PDF
Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit Convenor
Maya Ranganathan
Contact via email
Y3A, Hub 147, Room 156
Thursdays 1-2 p.m (email prior for appointment please)
Credit points Credit points
4
Prerequisites Prerequisites
Admission to MIntComm or MIntRel or MIntCommMIntRel or MPPP or MIntBusMIntComm
Corequisites Corequisites
Co-badged status Co-badged status
Unit description Unit description
This unit introduces students to 'communication' in the Asia-Pacific, a region in which media registers phenomenal growth, defying simple mapping. The potential audience numbers in parts of the region and their ability to influence perceptions call for critical evaluation of communication, in the context of discourses on globalisation. Within the theoretical framework of Edward Said's 'orientalism', Stuart Hall's 'media representations' and Robert Rolandson's 'glocalisation', the unit looks at representations that reflect and simultaneously influence complex political and cultural environments in the region. The unit is aimed at equipping students with the ability to critically evaluate impact of communication in the Asia-Pacific region on various spheres of activity in a globalised world.

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at http://students.mq.edu.au/student_admin/enrolmentguide/academicdates/

Learning Outcomes

  1. Critique key theories and concepts related to globalisation and their relevance to the study of communication in particular contexts in the Asia-Pacific region
  2. Apply disciplinary research methods to analyse the similarities and differences within the region
  3. Evaluate communication in the region in the context of historical and politico-social developments
  4. Synthesise alternative views and perspectives on effects of communication flows around the globe
  5. Engage in the process of learning to critically evaluate communication environments within theoretical frameworks

General Assessment Information

Readings are available online in the library website (Choose 'unit readings' and type in ICOM818). Both prescribed and suggested readings/activities are to be done ahead of the lectures/tutorials.

All written assessments are to be uploaded on Turnitin.  The test is to be done online.

All assessments must show evidence of acquaintance with and understanding of academic literature. This involves research and referencing beyond online material accessed through a Google search. Students may familiarise themselves with library access by attending the library orientation conducted at the beginning of semester (details in the library website). They are encouraged to seek guidance from subject librarians for accessing resources.

Assessment tasks are aligned to the unit Learning Outcomes. Timely submission of assessment tasks is a unit requirement or penalties apply. 10% per day (including weekends) will be deducted for all late submissions unless Disruptions to Studies (including a request for an extension) is approved.

You are required to attend all tutorials. As participation in the process of learning is linked to and underpins the unit Learning Outcomes, you will need to either apply for Disruptions to Studies to cover any missed tutorial (if the disruption is greater than three consecutive days) or supply appropriate documentation to your unit convenor for any missed tutorial (if less than three consecutive days).

Weekly access of ilearn is suggested. All announcements will be made in ilearn. Marks will be uploaded to ilearn grade book. Students may check the comments on written assessments by accessing Turnitin.

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Hurdle Due
Participation 10% Weeks 2-13
Critical Analysis 30% 31st March 2017
Test 20% Week 10
Major research essay 40% 5th June 2017

Participation

Due: Weeks 2-13
Weighting: 10%

 

Students are to contribute to tutorial discussions. Marks are for meaningful contributions and insightful observations that reflect reading, critical thought and awareness of contemporary issues. Ability to analyse them in the context of the concepts/theories dealt with in the unit will be regarded highly. Students are required to attend all tutorials.  In case of approved disruptions, participation will be evaluated proportionate to attendance.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Critique key theories and concepts related to globalisation and their relevance to the study of communication in particular contexts in the Asia-Pacific region
  • Evaluate communication in the region in the context of historical and politico-social developments
  • Synthesise alternative views and perspectives on effects of communication flows around the globe
  • Engage in the process of learning to critically evaluate communication environments within theoretical frameworks

Critical Analysis

Due: 31st March 2017
Weighting: 30%

Critically analyse literature on media representations of the 'West' and 'the Rest'.

This assessment aims at providing feedback on student's understanding of scholarly debates surrounding media representations of the Asia-Pacific (part of 'the Rest') and their ability to articulate them within an academic context. The essay of 1500 words requires critical evaluation of literature relating to media (print and electronic) representations of people, culture, issues and events. At this stage, students are expected to be familiar with accessing library resources and familiarise themselves with referencing formats.

Broadly, the essay requires wide and extensive reading of academic literature relating to media representations. In addition to an in-depth understanding of the theories dealt with in the first four weeks of semester, students must acquaint themselves with academic debates relating to the West-Rest dichotomy. The essay requires them to categorise the material and make logical and succinct arguments on their relevance in the context of recent international events and the state of global media. Arguments must be related to the theoretical and conceptual framework of the unit. Essay must meet academic requirements with regard to structure, content and references and be of a standard acceptable at the Master’s level.

The criteria against which the paper will be graded are:

  • evidence of clear understanding of the the theories relating to communication and media representations and ability to evaluate their relevance to the Asia-Pacific region,
  • evidence of extensive reading as seen in the critique of the theories and in appropriate in-text referencing and bibliography,
  • comprehension of the historical background and socio-political environments,
  • presentation which includes a clear writing style, good grammar and spelling.

(Rubric for written assessments posted in ilearn).


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Critique key theories and concepts related to globalisation and their relevance to the study of communication in particular contexts in the Asia-Pacific region
  • Apply disciplinary research methods to analyse the similarities and differences within the region
  • Evaluate communication in the region in the context of historical and politico-social developments
  • Synthesise alternative views and perspectives on effects of communication flows around the globe
  • Engage in the process of learning to critically evaluate communication environments within theoretical frameworks

Test

Due: Week 10
Weighting: 20%

A  multiple-choice to be done in Week 10 on ilearn at students' convenience. Details will be announced in tutorials ahead of the test.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Apply disciplinary research methods to analyse the similarities and differences within the region

Major research essay

Due: 5th June 2017
Weighting: 40%

Answer any one of the following in 2500 words:

1. Critically analyse and evaluate representations of the Asia-Pacific region (and people) by mainstream Australian media.

2. Drawing on the theoretical and methodological insights of Edward Said and Stuart Hall into media representations, explore  constructions of the 'other' in global television.

3. Examine representations of Asians/Africans in Hollywood films in the context of Western hegemony in general and Edward Said's thesis on 'orientalism' in particular.

This summative assessment requires understanding of theories relating to media representations and an ability to apply them to evaluate contemporary media environments. Theories relating to media representations and analysis of media environments in the Asia-Pacific region are part of the unit content. However, evaluation of the scenarios mentioned in the questions requires a knowledge of media analysis techniques (for instance, quantitative method like content analysis or qualitative methods like 'framing' and discourse analysis). Students are expected to choose an established research method to make the evaluation and avoid presenting an analysis based on personal observations. This would ideally involve critical evaluation of the theories of globalisation, Orientalism and post-colonialism and examination of their relevance in a world connected (or divided) by communication technologies.  Academic standards commensurate with study at the Masters level – research rigour, evidence of extensive reading, systematic analysis and academic writing – must be met. Essay must have an ‘introduction’, contain defined sections and a ‘conclusion’, with a list of relevant references at the end. Generalisations must be avoided and arguments substantiated. In-text references with page numbers in all cases are required.

Broadly, the essay requires choice of an appropriate media form and outlet to study and  event(s) or issue to analyse; identifying a region/country/community for analysis; collecting data consistently over a period of at least 15 days; analysing the data systematically using an academically accepted method and presenting the findings in the context of the theoretical and conceptual framework of the unit.

The criteria against which the essay will be graded are:

  • evidence of understanding of key theories and ability to extend them to the region and the issue chosen for study,
  • application of appropriate disciplinary-specific research methods,
  • comprehension of the historical background and socio-political environments,
  • ability to provide alternative perspectives, through in-text referencing and a comprehensive bibliography as also
  • presentation which includes a clear writing style, good grammar and spelling.

(See rubrics for written assessments in ilearn).


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Critique key theories and concepts related to globalisation and their relevance to the study of communication in particular contexts in the Asia-Pacific region
  • Apply disciplinary research methods to analyse the similarities and differences within the region
  • Evaluate communication in the region in the context of historical and politico-social developments
  • Synthesise alternative views and perspectives on effects of communication flows around the globe

Delivery and Resources

I hour face-to-face lecture. also recorded and available in Echo 360 on ilearn, followed by 1-hour tutorial. Students to check ilearn regularly for announcements and notes and instructions.

ICOM 818 readings are the prescribed reading for the unit and are available online through the library. Some suggested readings are in library reserve.

Changes since last offering:

Reading material and assessment tasks updated.

Unit Schedule

 

 

 

Week 1

 

 Theoretical framework: Orientalism

Prescribed reading:

1. Edward Said 1977, 'The scope of Orientalism,' Chapter 1 in Orientalism, London: Penguin.

Suggested readings (as relevant):

1. Daniel Martin Varisco, Reading orientalism: said and the unsaid, 2007. (Provided as e-book)

2. Edward W. Said Moustafa Bayoumi, The Edward Said reader, Andrew Rubin 2000. (Hard copies in library reserve)

NO TUTORIALS THIS WEEK. TIME TO BE USED FOR LIBRARY ORIENTATION.

Week 2

 

Theoretical framework: Cultural representations

Prescribed reading:

1. Stuart Hall, 1997, 'The spectacle of the 'other', Chapter 4 in Representation: Cultural Representations and Signifying Practices, Stuart Hall (ed.), London: Sage, pp. 225-277.

Suggested reading:

1. Shani Orgad, 2012, 'Media representation and the global imagination: a framework,' Chapter 1 in Media Representation and the Global Imagination, Cambridge: Polity Press.

Tutorials begin this week.

Week 3

 

 (Theoretical framework: Globalisation)

Prescribed reading:

1. Roland Robertson, 2012, 'Globalisation or glocalisation?' Journal of International Communication, 18:2, 191-208, DOI: 10.1080/13216597.2012.709925.

Suggested reading:

1. Paula Chakravartty and Yuezhi Zhao, 2008 , 'Introduction: Toward a transcultural political economy of global communications,' in Global Communications, New York: Rowman and Littlefield Publishers, pp. 1-19.

Week 4

 

Middle-East

Prescribed reading:

1. Ehsan Bakhshandeh, 2014, 'How mainstream Iranian newspapers portray the West,' The Journal of International Communication, 2014. Vol. 20, No. 2, 184–199, http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13216597.2014.948034

Suggested reading:

 1. Mary Page, Carrie Winstanley 2010, Writing Essays For Dummies, UK: John Wiley and Sons. (Hard copy in linrary reserve)

 

 

Week 5

 

South Asia

Prescribed reading:

1. Adrian Athique, 2012, 'Introduction: a global approach to Indian media,' Chapter 1, Indian Media, Cambridge: Polity Press, pp. 1-11.

Suggested reading:

1. Ranganathan, M, 2015,  'Sting journalism: a sign of the times,' in Usha M Rodrigues and Maya Ranganathan, Indian News Media: from observer to participant, Sage: New Delhi, pp. 65-94

First assessment due this week

Week 6

 

 South-East Asia

Prescribed reading:

1.  George, Cherian, 2012, Freedom from the Press: journalism and state power in Singapore, Singapore: NUS Press, pp.183-223.

Suggested reading:

1. Gomez, James, 2000, Self-censorship: Singapore's shame, http://www.academia.edu/225107/Self-Censorship_Singapores_Shame

   

 Week 7

Central Asia

Prescribed reading:

1. Rosalind Marsh, 2013, 'The Concepts of Gender, Citizenship, and Empire and Their Reflection in Post‐Soviet Culture,' The Russian Review, 2013, Vol.72(2), pp.187-211.

Suggested reading:

Kalinina, Ekaterina, 2017, Beyond nostalgia for the Soviet past: Interpreting documentaries on Russian television, European Journal of Cultural Studies, p.1 –22. Available online at: http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/pdf/10.1177/1367549416682245.

Week 8

 

 East Asia

Prescribed reading:

1. David Shim and Dirk Nabers, 2013, ‘Imaging North Korea: Exploring its visual representations in international politics,’ International Studies Perspectives, August 2013, Vol.14 (3), pp.289-306.

Suggested activity:

Watch 'Under the sun' documentary on North Korea directed by Vitaly Mansky and produced by Natalia Manskaya, Simone Baumann, Filip Remunda,Distributed by Deckert Distribution Icarus Films (United States),   Release date 29 October 2015. With English sub-titles.

Week 9

 

 Africa

Prescribed reading:

1. Last Moyo, 2011, ‘The CNN defect’, Journal of International Communication, 17:2, 121-138, DOI: 10.1080/13216597.2011.589365.

Week 10

 

 Australia

Prescribed reading:

1. Foster, Nena, Kay Cook, Sarah Barter-Godfrey and Samantha Furneaux, 2011, 'Fractured multiculturalism: Conflicting representations of Arab and Muslim Australians in Australian print media,' Media, Culture & Society, 33(4) 619–629

Suggested activity:

Watch SBS series 'Living with the enemy' http://www.sbs.com.au/programs/article/2014/08/24/episode-4-islam

ONLINE TEST FOR 20 PER CENT DUE THIS WEEK

Week 11

 

 The Neighbourhood

Prescribed reading:

1. Evangelina Papoutsaki and Usha Sundar Harris, 2008, 'Unpacking' islandness in South Pacific Islands Communication' in Evangelina Papoutsaki and Usha Sundar Harris (eds) South Pacific Islands Communication, AMIC Asian Communication Series, pp.1-12. 2. Rodanthi Tzanelli, 2014, ‘Heritage entropy? Cinematic pilgrimage in New Zealand,’ in Heritage in the Digital Era: Cinematic Tourism and the Activist Cause, Oxon: Routledge, pp.23-61.

Week 12

 

 De-westernising media education

Prescribed reading:

1. Breit, Rhonda, Levi Obijiofor and Richard Fitzgerald,  2013, ' Internationalization as De-Westernization of the Curriculum: The Case of Journalism at an Australian University,' Journal of Studies in International Education May 2013 vol. 17 no. 2 pp. 119-135.

 

 

Week 13

 

 

NO LECTURES OR TUTORIALS

Final essay due

 

 

Policies and Procedures

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central. Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Academic Honesty Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/academic_honesty/policy.html

Assessment Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/assessment/policy_2016.html

Grade Appeal Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/gradeappeal/policy.html

Complaint Management Procedure for Students and Members of the Public http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/complaint_management/procedure.html​

Disruption to Studies Policy (in effect until Dec 4th, 2017): http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/disruption_studies/policy.html

Special Consideration Policy (in effect from Dec 4th, 2017): https://staff.mq.edu.au/work/strategy-planning-and-governance/university-policies-and-procedures/policies/special-consideration

In addition, a number of other policies can be found in the Learning and Teaching Category of Policy Central.

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/support/student_conduct/

Results

Results shown in iLearn, or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent. For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au.

Additional information

MMCCS website https://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/faculties_and_departments/faculty_of_arts/department_of_media_music_communication_and_cultural_studies/

MMCCS Session Re-mark Application http://www.mq.edu.au/pubstatic/public/download/?id=167914

Information is correct at the time of publication

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Learning Skills

Learning Skills (mq.edu.au/learningskills) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to improve your marks and take control of your study.

Student Enquiry Service

For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at ask.mq.edu.au

Equity Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

IT Help

For help with University computer systems and technology, visit http://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/information_technology/help/

When using the University's IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use of IT Resources Policy. The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network including students.

Graduate Capabilities

PG - Capable of Professional and Personal Judgment and Initiative

Our postgraduates will demonstrate a high standard of discernment and common sense in their professional and personal judgment. They will have the ability to make informed choices and decisions that reflect both the nature of their professional work and their personal perspectives.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Apply disciplinary research methods to analyse the similarities and differences within the region
  • Evaluate communication in the region in the context of historical and politico-social developments
  • Synthesise alternative views and perspectives on effects of communication flows around the globe
  • Engage in the process of learning to critically evaluate communication environments within theoretical frameworks

Assessment tasks

  • Participation
  • Critical Analysis
  • Major research essay

PG - Discipline Knowledge and Skills

Our postgraduates will be able to demonstrate a significantly enhanced depth and breadth of knowledge, scholarly understanding, and specific subject content knowledge in their chosen fields.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Critique key theories and concepts related to globalisation and their relevance to the study of communication in particular contexts in the Asia-Pacific region
  • Apply disciplinary research methods to analyse the similarities and differences within the region
  • Evaluate communication in the region in the context of historical and politico-social developments
  • Synthesise alternative views and perspectives on effects of communication flows around the globe
  • Engage in the process of learning to critically evaluate communication environments within theoretical frameworks

Assessment tasks

  • Participation
  • Critical Analysis
  • Test
  • Major research essay

PG - Critical, Analytical and Integrative Thinking

Our postgraduates will be capable of utilising and reflecting on prior knowledge and experience, of applying higher level critical thinking skills, and of integrating and synthesising learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments. A characteristic of this form of thinking is the generation of new, professionally oriented knowledge through personal or group-based critique of practice and theory.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Critique key theories and concepts related to globalisation and their relevance to the study of communication in particular contexts in the Asia-Pacific region
  • Apply disciplinary research methods to analyse the similarities and differences within the region
  • Evaluate communication in the region in the context of historical and politico-social developments
  • Synthesise alternative views and perspectives on effects of communication flows around the globe
  • Engage in the process of learning to critically evaluate communication environments within theoretical frameworks

Assessment tasks

  • Participation
  • Critical Analysis
  • Test
  • Major research essay

PG - Research and Problem Solving Capability

Our postgraduates will be capable of systematic enquiry; able to use research skills to create new knowledge that can be applied to real world issues, or contribute to a field of study or practice to enhance society. They will be capable of creative questioning, problem finding and problem solving.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • Apply disciplinary research methods to analyse the similarities and differences within the region

Assessment tasks

  • Participation
  • Critical Analysis
  • Major research essay

PG - Effective Communication

Our postgraduates will be able to communicate effectively and convey their views to different social, cultural, and professional audiences. They will be able to use a variety of technologically supported media to communicate with empathy using a range of written, spoken or visual formats.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Critique key theories and concepts related to globalisation and their relevance to the study of communication in particular contexts in the Asia-Pacific region
  • Evaluate communication in the region in the context of historical and politico-social developments
  • Synthesise alternative views and perspectives on effects of communication flows around the globe
  • Engage in the process of learning to critically evaluate communication environments within theoretical frameworks

Assessment tasks

  • Participation
  • Critical Analysis
  • Test
  • Major research essay

PG - Engaged and Responsible, Active and Ethical Citizens

Our postgraduates will be ethically aware and capable of confident transformative action in relation to their professional responsibilities and the wider community. They will have a sense of connectedness with others and country and have a sense of mutual obligation. They will be able to appreciate the impact of their professional roles for social justice and inclusion related to national and global issues

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Critique key theories and concepts related to globalisation and their relevance to the study of communication in particular contexts in the Asia-Pacific region
  • Apply disciplinary research methods to analyse the similarities and differences within the region
  • Synthesise alternative views and perspectives on effects of communication flows around the globe

Assessment tasks

  • Participation
  • Critical Analysis
  • Major research essay

Changes from Previous Offering

The tutorial hour has been reduced to one hour from two. Readings and activities have been tailored to suit the changed structure. The suggested activity is to be done at students' convenience before the lecture. The test is to be done in the week due at their own time online.