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AHIS261 – Egypt in the First Millennium CE

2017 – S2 Day

General Information

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Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff Convener
Malcolm Choat
Contact via 9850 7561
AHH 2.657
By appointment
Credit points Credit points
3
Prerequisites Prerequisites
12cp at 100 level or above
Corequisites Corequisites
Co-badged status Co-badged status
Unit description Unit description
This unit is an overview of Egyptian society, economy and culture in the period from the Roman conquest of Egypt to the Fatimid period. Topics include: natural resources and the built environment; government and taxation; agriculture and trade; the structure of society; ethnicity; literacy and bilingualism (Greek, Demotic and the rise of Coptic); the growth and development of Christianity; and the fate of Egyptian Christianity in the centuries after the Arab conquest.

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at http://students.mq.edu.au/student_admin/enrolmentguide/academicdates/

Learning Outcomes

  1. Identify evidence for the history and culture, and socio-economic and religious milieu in Egypt in the first millennium CE.
  2. Assess sources within their historical context, to understand the characteristics of their particular type or genre.
  3. Consider critically how discourses of cultural and religious interaction have shaped our view of the past.
  4. Classify and interpret ancient documentary, literary, and artifactual material
  5. Apply skills in using bibliographical resources, research tools, databases, and online resources to the study of the ancient world
  6. Utilise communication skills appropriate to academic presentations and discussions

General Assessment Information

Assignment Submission

All written assignments will be submitted via Turnitin. You are required to present yourself for examination at the time and place designated in the University Examination Timetable. The only exception to sitting an examination at the designated time is because of documented illness or unavoidable disruption. In these circumstances, please consult University Policy for the available procedure.

Extensions

All deadlines are firm unless an extension has been requested before the due date. All requests for extension must be submitted via the University's Disruption to Studies system. A penalty for lateness will apply unless an extension has been granted. No written work will be accepted for assessment after the end of Week 13. 5% of credit will be deducted for the first day assignments are submitted late without an extension and thereafter 2% of credit will be deducted per day for assignments submitted late without an extension. Assignments handed in early will not be marked and returned before the due date. Always retain a copy of work you submit in case it is lost in the online system.

 

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Hurdle Due
Essay Plan 20% 1.9.17
Essay 40% 20.10.17
Exam 30% Examination Period
Tutorial Participation 10% Week 1–6, 8–12

Essay Plan

Due: 1.9.17
Weighting: 20%

In no more than 500 words, set out the main ancient evidence you will address in your essay, your key argument (i.e. a succinct response to the question) and the three main propositions you will make, supported by examples taken from the evidence. The sources may be presented in a bullet point list or in prose. The propositions should be a paragraph each. An accompanying bibliography should provide full references for the ancient sources you will use, as well as a separate list of full references to any modern sources you refer to.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Identify evidence for the history and culture, and socio-economic and religious milieu in Egypt in the first millennium CE.
  • Assess sources within their historical context, to understand the characteristics of their particular type or genre.
  • Classify and interpret ancient documentary, literary, and artifactual material
  • Apply skills in using bibliographical resources, research tools, databases, and online resources to the study of the ancient world
  • Utilise communication skills appropriate to academic presentations and discussions

Essay

Due: 20.10.17
Weighting: 40%

The major essay must be 2000 words (+/- 10%). It is important to base your essay on ancient sources, and to compile your own list of up-to-date modern discussions of the question. Do not hesitate to approach me for guidance over your essay at any stage.

Essays must be accompanied by a bibliography of the ancient and modern sources used. They must be referenced according to one of the accepted conventions, that is, footnotes, endnotes, or ‘in-text’ referencing. In general, footnotes are the preferred and usual method for such work. The presentation of the essay should follow accepted scholarly practice. A guide to ‘Essay Presentation & Conventions: Style Guide’ is available here, and this should be followed.

There will be a choice of topics for the essay, which will be provided on the unit iLearn site.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Identify evidence for the history and culture, and socio-economic and religious milieu in Egypt in the first millennium CE.
  • Assess sources within their historical context, to understand the characteristics of their particular type or genre.
  • Consider critically how discourses of cultural and religious interaction have shaped our view of the past.
  • Classify and interpret ancient documentary, literary, and artifactual material
  • Apply skills in using bibliographical resources, research tools, databases, and online resources to the study of the ancient world
  • Utilise communication skills appropriate to academic presentations and discussions

Exam

Due: Examination Period
Weighting: 30%

There will be a two (2) hour examination during the exam period at the end of semester. Further guidance on the exam will be provided during the session.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Identify evidence for the history and culture, and socio-economic and religious milieu in Egypt in the first millennium CE.
  • Assess sources within their historical context, to understand the characteristics of their particular type or genre.
  • Classify and interpret ancient documentary, literary, and artifactual material
  • Utilise communication skills appropriate to academic presentations and discussions

Tutorial Participation

Due: Week 1–6, 8–12
Weighting: 10%

Ten percent (10%) of your mark will be based on your participation in Tutorials. "Participation" in the tutorials is not assessed on the quality or length of the contribution, but simply on your participation in our discussions. Active participation which demonstrates your preparation and engagement with the themes of the tutorial is the best way of ensuring full marks for this task, which helps build crucial communication skills. It is naturally impossible to participate in the discussion if one does not attend the tutorial.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Identify evidence for the history and culture, and socio-economic and religious milieu in Egypt in the first millennium CE.
  • Consider critically how discourses of cultural and religious interaction have shaped our view of the past.
  • Classify and interpret ancient documentary, literary, and artifactual material
  • Utilise communication skills appropriate to academic presentations and discussions

Delivery and Resources

Lecture times and locations

The lectures for this unit will take place every Tuesday fro 11am–1 pm in E7B 263. Tutorials will be held from 2–3 pm in W5C 232 and from 3–4 pm in W5C 211. 

Readings

There is no textbook for this unit. Required readings will be available via iShare through the Macquarie University Library Website, and on the iLearn page.

Technology Used

The unit has an iLearn page which can be accessed at https://ilearn.mq.edu.au/login/index.php. PC and internet access are therefore required. Basic computer skills (e.g., internet browsing) and skills in word processing are also a requirement. Material for this unit may be delivered via the unit iLearn page. The lectures will be recorded for external students.

Unit Schedule

Week

Date

Lectures

Tutorial / Discussion

1

1/8

Overview and Themes

Introductions

2

8/8

History I: Greeks and Egyptians in the first millennium BCE

Mercenaries and commanders under Psamtek III

3

15/8

History II: Roman Egypt: Cleopatra to Diocletian.

Roman Views of Egypt

4

22/8

Sources, Geography, and Language

Language use in Roman Egypt

5

29/8

Religion I: Egyptian Religion in the Roman period

Divination in Roman Egypt

6

5/9

Religion II: Christianity in Egypt to the fourth century

The early history of Christianity in Egypt

7

12/9

No Lectures

No Tutorials

                                                                 Mid-Semester Break 18/9–29/9

8

3/10

History III: From Constantine to the Arab Conquest

The life and death of Hypatia

9

10/10

Religion III: Monasticism, Chalcedon, and Beyond

Coptic views on the Council of Chalcedon

10

17/10

Religion IV: Egyptian Religion in the Byzantine Period

Egyptian Religion in Late Antiquity: hagiography and the rhetoric of survival.

11

24/10

History IV: Egypt in the Islamic world

Religion V: Egyptian Christians under Muslim Rule

Contemporary sources on the Arab conquest of Egypt

12

31/10

Government, Law, people, and settlements.

Gender, Family, and Children

13

7/11

Overview & Wrap-up

No Tutorial

Policies and Procedures

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central. Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Academic Honesty Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/academic_honesty/policy.html

Assessment Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/assessment/policy_2016.html

Grade Appeal Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/gradeappeal/policy.html

Complaint Management Procedure for Students and Members of the Public http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/complaint_management/procedure.html​

Disruption to Studies Policy (in effect until Dec 4th, 2017): http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/disruption_studies/policy.html

Special Consideration Policy (in effect from Dec 4th, 2017): https://staff.mq.edu.au/work/strategy-planning-and-governance/university-policies-and-procedures/policies/special-consideration

In addition, a number of other policies can be found in the Learning and Teaching Category of Policy Central.

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/support/student_conduct/

Results

Results shown in iLearn, or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent. For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au.

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Learning Skills

Learning Skills (mq.edu.au/learningskills) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to improve your marks and take control of your study.

Student Enquiry Service

For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at ask.mq.edu.au

Equity Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

IT Help

For help with University computer systems and technology, visit http://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/information_technology/help/

When using the University's IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use of IT Resources Policy. The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network including students.

Graduate Capabilities

Creative and Innovative

Our graduates will also be capable of creative thinking and of creating knowledge. They will be imaginative and open to experience and capable of innovation at work and in the community. We want them to be engaged in applying their critical, creative thinking.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Assess sources within their historical context, to understand the characteristics of their particular type or genre.
  • Consider critically how discourses of cultural and religious interaction have shaped our view of the past.
  • Classify and interpret ancient documentary, literary, and artifactual material
  • Utilise communication skills appropriate to academic presentations and discussions

Assessment tasks

  • Essay Plan
  • Essay
  • Exam
  • Tutorial Participation

Engaged and Ethical Local and Global citizens

As local citizens our graduates will be aware of indigenous perspectives and of the nation's historical context. They will be engaged with the challenges of contemporary society and with knowledge and ideas. We want our graduates to have respect for diversity, to be open-minded, sensitive to others and inclusive, and to be open to other cultures and perspectives: they should have a level of cultural literacy. Our graduates should be aware of disadvantage and social justice, and be willing to participate to help create a wiser and better society.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Assess sources within their historical context, to understand the characteristics of their particular type or genre.
  • Consider critically how discourses of cultural and religious interaction have shaped our view of the past.
  • Utilise communication skills appropriate to academic presentations and discussions

Assessment tasks

  • Essay Plan
  • Essay
  • Exam
  • Tutorial Participation

Socially and Environmentally Active and Responsible

We want our graduates to be aware of and have respect for self and others; to be able to work with others as a leader and a team player; to have a sense of connectedness with others and country; and to have a sense of mutual obligation. Our graduates should be informed and active participants in moving society towards sustainability.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Assess sources within their historical context, to understand the characteristics of their particular type or genre.
  • Consider critically how discourses of cultural and religious interaction have shaped our view of the past.

Assessment tasks

  • Essay Plan
  • Essay
  • Exam
  • Tutorial Participation

Problem Solving and Research Capability

Our graduates should be capable of researching; of analysing, and interpreting and assessing data and information in various forms; of drawing connections across fields of knowledge; and they should be able to relate their knowledge to complex situations at work or in the world, in order to diagnose and solve problems. We want them to have the confidence to take the initiative in doing so, within an awareness of their own limitations.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Assess sources within their historical context, to understand the characteristics of their particular type or genre.
  • Consider critically how discourses of cultural and religious interaction have shaped our view of the past.
  • Classify and interpret ancient documentary, literary, and artifactual material

Assessment tasks

  • Essay Plan
  • Essay
  • Exam
  • Tutorial Participation

Effective Communication

We want to develop in our students the ability to communicate and convey their views in forms effective with different audiences. We want our graduates to take with them the capability to read, listen, question, gather and evaluate information resources in a variety of formats, assess, write clearly, speak effectively, and to use visual communication and communication technologies as appropriate.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Classify and interpret ancient documentary, literary, and artifactual material
  • Utilise communication skills appropriate to academic presentations and discussions

Assessment tasks

  • Essay Plan
  • Essay
  • Exam
  • Tutorial Participation

Capable of Professional and Personal Judgement and Initiative

We want our graduates to have emotional intelligence and sound interpersonal skills and to demonstrate discernment and common sense in their professional and personal judgement. They will exercise initiative as needed. They will be capable of risk assessment, and be able to handle ambiguity and complexity, enabling them to be adaptable in diverse and changing environments.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Apply skills in using bibliographical resources, research tools, databases, and online resources to the study of the ancient world
  • Utilise communication skills appropriate to academic presentations and discussions

Assessment tasks

  • Essay Plan
  • Essay
  • Exam
  • Tutorial Participation

Discipline Specific Knowledge and Skills

Our graduates will take with them the intellectual development, depth and breadth of knowledge, scholarly understanding, and specific subject content in their chosen fields to make them competent and confident in their subject or profession. They will be able to demonstrate, where relevant, professional technical competence and meet professional standards. They will be able to articulate the structure of knowledge of their discipline, be able to adapt discipline-specific knowledge to novel situations, and be able to contribute from their discipline to inter-disciplinary solutions to problems.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Identify evidence for the history and culture, and socio-economic and religious milieu in Egypt in the first millennium CE.
  • Assess sources within their historical context, to understand the characteristics of their particular type or genre.
  • Consider critically how discourses of cultural and religious interaction have shaped our view of the past.
  • Classify and interpret ancient documentary, literary, and artifactual material
  • Apply skills in using bibliographical resources, research tools, databases, and online resources to the study of the ancient world

Assessment tasks

  • Essay Plan
  • Essay
  • Exam
  • Tutorial Participation

Critical, Analytical and Integrative Thinking

We want our graduates to be capable of reasoning, questioning and analysing, and to integrate and synthesise learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments; to be able to critique constraints, assumptions and limitations; to be able to think independently and systemically in relation to scholarly activity, in the workplace, and in the world. We want them to have a level of scientific and information technology literacy.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Assess sources within their historical context, to understand the characteristics of their particular type or genre.
  • Consider critically how discourses of cultural and religious interaction have shaped our view of the past.
  • Classify and interpret ancient documentary, literary, and artifactual material

Assessment tasks

  • Essay Plan
  • Essay
  • Exam
  • Tutorial Participation