Logo Students

AHIS272 – Ancient Egyptian Literature

2017 – S2 External

General Information

Pdf icon Download as PDF
Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit Convenor
Susanne Binder
Contact via susanne.binder@mq.edu.au
AHH Level 2 north
by appointment
Credit points Credit points
3
Prerequisites Prerequisites
12cp at 100 level or above
Corequisites Corequisites
Co-badged status Co-badged status
Unit description Unit description
This unit introduces students to the corpus of literary texts from Ancient Egypt. Students read and analyse a representative selection of primary sources in English translation. These texts cover a variety of genres ranging from tales and teachings to biographies, dialogues and satires, as well as poetry and songs. They date from the Old Kingdom (c. 2500 BCE) to the Late New Kingdom (c. 1000 BCE).

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at http://students.mq.edu.au/student_admin/enrolmentguide/academicdates/

Learning Outcomes

  1. read a representative body of literary texts from ancient Egypt.
  2. apply categories of text analysis to the ancient writings.
  3. define distinguishing features of ancient literary texts and to compare and contrast them with works of modern world literature.
  4. characterize key concepts of the ancient Egyptian world view, society and religion as reflected in the literary writings.
  5. appraise the literary texts from ancient Egypt as an example for the role literature plays in a literate/illiterate society as a form of human expression in dealing with the big issues in life.
  6. respond creatively to select passages to literary texts from ancient Egypt.
  7. critically assess the current scholarly debate on aspects of modern literary theory and its application to ancient Egyptian literature.

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Hurdle Due
Fact File 10% as per arrangement
Tutorial Paper 10% within Weeks 2-7
Quiz online (2) 10% Week 6, Week 12
Research Essay 30% Wednesday Week 9
Participation 20% Weeks 2-8, 10-12
Final Test (online) 20% Week 13

Fact File

Due: as per arrangement
Weighting: 10%

Brief oral presentation (max. 10 minutes) in class  of the "facts" about a specific ancient Egyptian literary text - accompanied by a powerpoint presentation. In preparation the student follows a specific catalogue of questions (see iLearn site).


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • read a representative body of literary texts from ancient Egypt.
  • apply categories of text analysis to the ancient writings.
  • define distinguishing features of ancient literary texts and to compare and contrast them with works of modern world literature.

Tutorial Paper

Due: within Weeks 2-7
Weighting: 10%

800-1000 words on set Tutorial Paper topics.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • apply categories of text analysis to the ancient writings.
  • define distinguishing features of ancient literary texts and to compare and contrast them with works of modern world literature.
  • characterize key concepts of the ancient Egyptian world view, society and religion as reflected in the literary writings.
  • critically assess the current scholarly debate on aspects of modern literary theory and its application to ancient Egyptian literature.

Quiz online (2)

Due: Week 6, Week 12
Weighting: 10%

Two (2) short, 20-minute quizzes (multiple choice, true-false, matching, multiple correct, short answer etc) on the contents and important facts about the primary sources (5% each).


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • read a representative body of literary texts from ancient Egypt.
  • apply categories of text analysis to the ancient writings.

Research Essay

Due: Wednesday Week 9
Weighting: 30%

A 2,000-words research essay. Students either analyse a range of ancient literary texts in the light of a particular theme or evaluate the range of scholarship on one specific ancient literary text.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • read a representative body of literary texts from ancient Egypt.
  • apply categories of text analysis to the ancient writings.
  • define distinguishing features of ancient literary texts and to compare and contrast them with works of modern world literature.
  • characterize key concepts of the ancient Egyptian world view, society and religion as reflected in the literary writings.
  • appraise the literary texts from ancient Egypt as an example for the role literature plays in a literate/illiterate society as a form of human expression in dealing with the big issues in life.
  • critically assess the current scholarly debate on aspects of modern literary theory and its application to ancient Egyptian literature.

Participation

Due: Weeks 2-8, 10-12
Weighting: 20%

Quality and regularity of participation based on thorough preparation, interaction in class and the specified forums online on the iLearn site. This includes presenting at the special "Performance" in Week 12.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • read a representative body of literary texts from ancient Egypt.
  • apply categories of text analysis to the ancient writings.
  • define distinguishing features of ancient literary texts and to compare and contrast them with works of modern world literature.
  • characterize key concepts of the ancient Egyptian world view, society and religion as reflected in the literary writings.
  • appraise the literary texts from ancient Egypt as an example for the role literature plays in a literate/illiterate society as a form of human expression in dealing with the big issues in life.
  • respond creatively to select passages to literary texts from ancient Egypt.
  • critically assess the current scholarly debate on aspects of modern literary theory and its application to ancient Egyptian literature.

Final Test (online)

Due: Week 13
Weighting: 20%

1-hour test (online): students analyse and comment critically on two text passages from the corpus of ancient Egyptian literary texts.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • read a representative body of literary texts from ancient Egypt.
  • apply categories of text analysis to the ancient writings.
  • define distinguishing features of ancient literary texts and to compare and contrast them with works of modern world literature.
  • characterize key concepts of the ancient Egyptian world view, society and religion as reflected in the literary writings.
  • critically assess the current scholarly debate on aspects of modern literary theory and its application to ancient Egyptian literature.

Delivery and Resources

Technology used and required

Online Unit

Login is via: https://ilearn.mq.edu.au/ Is my unit in iLearn? http://help.ilearn.mq.edu.au/unitsonline/ to check when your online unit will become available.

Technology

Students are required to have regular access to a computer and the internet. Mobile devices alone are not sufficient. The preferred operating system is Windows 10.

Students are required to access the online unit in iLearn by the end of Week 1 and follow any relevant instructions and links for downloads that may be required.

Delivery

This unit is taught on campus and in external mode. Both types of delivery have access to the same iLearn site but with separate Discussion Forums for the external students. There are online activities for both campus students and external students.

The unit is conducted as a lectorial in a 3-hour block, which means that lecture and tutorial are integrated allowing for more student participation.

The unit uses iLearn and the recordings on Echo 360 of the AHIS272 on-campus lectorials. The unit can be accessed through http://ilearn.mq.edu.au

Location of class: check the relevant MQ web-page  http://students.mq.edu.au/student_admin/timetables

Required Resource

All students need to have the following book that we will work with throughout the semester. It is available in hard-copy and in electronic form.

  • W.K. Simpson, R.K. Ritner, V.A. Tobin and E. Wente (2003) The Literature of Ancient Egypt. An Anthology of Stories, Instructions, Stelae, Autobiographies and Poetry (New Haven: Yale University Press) ISBN 9780300099201

For other the recommended resources, secondary literature, study aids and further instructions, see the AHIS272 Bibliography on the iLearn site.

Attendance

To successfully complete this unit students actively participate in all the learning activities and assessment tasks of this unit - external students in the forums on the iLearn site, and campus students both in class and on the accompanying iLearn site. Students need to log on to the iLearn site regularly for supportive materials, forums and assessment (Quizzes in Weeks 6 and 12). External students need to note that weekly contributions online are equivalent to participation in class. Silence is considered absence. -  Students absent due to illness or other valid reasons should notify the Unit Convenor or the Department Administrator (ancienthistory@mq.edu.au / phone: 02 9850 8833). Repeated unexplained absences will result in a deduction of percentage points from the final result of the unit or the exclusion from the unit. For the rules on Extensions and Penalties, see below.

Participation

Students are expected to participate actively in the lectorials and in the online component of the unit on iLearn.

Punctuality

Students are expected to arrive on campus on time for classes  (arriving late is disruptive).

Preparation

Preparing for the weekly classes and online forums (for the externals) means completing the readings and reflecting on the focus questions. The on-time submission of assignments are integral part of the unit. Both the class/forum discussions and your written work aim at building your competence in understanding and analyzing the unit material. Regular and thorough preparation enable you to participate actively in class and also enhance and strengthen your learning process. Ultimately this will lead to a positive learning experience. 

Workload

Students are expected to invest 3 hours of work per credit point per week over a 15-week period to satisfactorily complete the unit. This means a total of 135 hours. This time includes the attendance/listening to the lectures and the tutorials.

Successful completion

Students are expected to complete all the assignments by the due date (for details see section "Assessment Tasks"). To pass the unit successfully, the student will need to reach a minimum of 50% across the Assessment tasks.

Unit Schedule

Week 1 Introduction - Ancient Egyptian Literature: texts, definitions, scripts, writing, literacy. Key concepts of literary analysis: author, audience/reader, purpose, " Sitz im Leben", genre, style, plot and character
Week 2 TALES: King Kheops and the Magicians / The Shipwrecked Sailor
Week 3 TRAVEL NARRATIVES: Sinuhe / Wenamun
Week 4

DIALOGUES: The Eloquent Peasant / The Man and his Ba

Week 5 LATE EGYPTIAN STORIES (1): the Quarrel of Apophis and Sekenenre / The Capture of Joppa / The Tale of the Doomed Prince
Week 6 LATE EGYPTIAN STORIES (2): The Tale of Two Brothers / The Contendings of Horus and Seth
Week 7 BIOGRAPHIES: examples to illustrate the development of the genre from Old Kingdom, First Intermediate Period, Middle Kingdom, early New Kingdom, later New Kingdom (Ramesside period). 
Week 8 no lecture/tutorial (Labour Day)
Week 9 INSTRUCTIONS AND TEACHINGS: The Admonitions of Ipuwer / The Teaching of Amenemhet I / The Prophecy of Neferty ESSAY due Wednesday Week 9
Week 10 POETRY: Love Songs / Harper's Songs
Week 11

SATIRE AND HUMOUR: Satire of Trades / stories without words

DEMOTIC LITERATURE: the Setna-Khaemwas stories / Prince Pedikhons and Queen serpot / The Lion in Search of Man

Week 12

"Performance"

Week 13 Test: Text analysis and commentary

Learning and Teaching Activities

Lectorials

Every week: prepare and engage with the ancient texts, discuss with fellow students in class.

Presenting

Students participate in presenting information content to the class (Fact File) very week: preparing and engaging with the ancient texts and discussing with the fellow students online; focusing on key themes and analytical approaches.

Writing

Reading, reflecting, researching and writing the tutorial paper and research essay.

Building memory

Training memory and recall of key facts and elements, contents and themes of ancient Egyptian literature.

Policies and Procedures

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central. Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Academic Honesty Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/academic_honesty/policy.html

Assessment Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/assessment/policy_2016.html

Grade Appeal Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/gradeappeal/policy.html

Complaint Management Procedure for Students and Members of the Public http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/complaint_management/procedure.html​

Disruption to Studies Policy (in effect until Dec 4th, 2017): http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/disruption_studies/policy.html

Special Consideration Policy (in effect from Dec 4th, 2017): https://staff.mq.edu.au/work/strategy-planning-and-governance/university-policies-and-procedures/policies/special-consideration

In addition, a number of other policies can be found in the Learning and Teaching Category of Policy Central.

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/support/student_conduct/

Results

Results shown in iLearn, or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent. For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au.

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Learning Skills

Learning Skills (mq.edu.au/learningskills) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to improve your marks and take control of your study.

Student Enquiry Service

For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at ask.mq.edu.au

Equity Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

IT Help

For help with University computer systems and technology, visit http://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/information_technology/help/

When using the University's IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use of IT Resources Policy. The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network including students.

Graduate Capabilities

Creative and Innovative

Our graduates will also be capable of creative thinking and of creating knowledge. They will be imaginative and open to experience and capable of innovation at work and in the community. We want them to be engaged in applying their critical, creative thinking.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • respond creatively to select passages to literary texts from ancient Egypt.

Assessment task

  • Participation

Learning and teaching activity

  • Students participate in presenting information content to the class (Fact File) very week: preparing and engaging with the ancient texts and discussing with the fellow students online; focusing on key themes and analytical approaches.

Engaged and Ethical Local and Global citizens

As local citizens our graduates will be aware of indigenous perspectives and of the nation's historical context. They will be engaged with the challenges of contemporary society and with knowledge and ideas. We want our graduates to have respect for diversity, to be open-minded, sensitive to others and inclusive, and to be open to other cultures and perspectives: they should have a level of cultural literacy. Our graduates should be aware of disadvantage and social justice, and be willing to participate to help create a wiser and better society.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • define distinguishing features of ancient literary texts and to compare and contrast them with works of modern world literature.
  • appraise the literary texts from ancient Egypt as an example for the role literature plays in a literate/illiterate society as a form of human expression in dealing with the big issues in life.

Assessment tasks

  • Research Essay
  • Participation

Learning and teaching activities

  • Every week: prepare and engage with the ancient texts, discuss with fellow students in class.
  • Students participate in presenting information content to the class (Fact File) very week: preparing and engaging with the ancient texts and discussing with the fellow students online; focusing on key themes and analytical approaches.
  • Reading, reflecting, researching and writing the tutorial paper and research essay.
  • Training memory and recall of key facts and elements, contents and themes of ancient Egyptian literature.

Socially and Environmentally Active and Responsible

We want our graduates to be aware of and have respect for self and others; to be able to work with others as a leader and a team player; to have a sense of connectedness with others and country; and to have a sense of mutual obligation. Our graduates should be informed and active participants in moving society towards sustainability.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • appraise the literary texts from ancient Egypt as an example for the role literature plays in a literate/illiterate society as a form of human expression in dealing with the big issues in life.
  • critically assess the current scholarly debate on aspects of modern literary theory and its application to ancient Egyptian literature.

Assessment task

  • Participation

Learning and teaching activity

  • Every week: prepare and engage with the ancient texts, discuss with fellow students in class.
  • Students participate in presenting information content to the class (Fact File) very week: preparing and engaging with the ancient texts and discussing with the fellow students online; focusing on key themes and analytical approaches.
  • Reading, reflecting, researching and writing the tutorial paper and research essay.
  • Training memory and recall of key facts and elements, contents and themes of ancient Egyptian literature.

Commitment to Continuous Learning

Our graduates will have enquiring minds and a literate curiosity which will lead them to pursue knowledge for its own sake. They will continue to pursue learning in their careers and as they participate in the world. They will be capable of reflecting on their experiences and relationships with others and the environment, learning from them, and growing - personally, professionally and socially.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • read a representative body of literary texts from ancient Egypt.
  • characterize key concepts of the ancient Egyptian world view, society and religion as reflected in the literary writings.

Assessment tasks

  • Tutorial Paper
  • Quiz online (2)
  • Research Essay
  • Participation
  • Final Test (online)

Learning and teaching activities

  • Every week: prepare and engage with the ancient texts, discuss with fellow students in class.
  • Students participate in presenting information content to the class (Fact File) very week: preparing and engaging with the ancient texts and discussing with the fellow students online; focusing on key themes and analytical approaches.
  • Reading, reflecting, researching and writing the tutorial paper and research essay.
  • Training memory and recall of key facts and elements, contents and themes of ancient Egyptian literature.

Problem Solving and Research Capability

Our graduates should be capable of researching; of analysing, and interpreting and assessing data and information in various forms; of drawing connections across fields of knowledge; and they should be able to relate their knowledge to complex situations at work or in the world, in order to diagnose and solve problems. We want them to have the confidence to take the initiative in doing so, within an awareness of their own limitations.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • apply categories of text analysis to the ancient writings.
  • characterize key concepts of the ancient Egyptian world view, society and religion as reflected in the literary writings.
  • appraise the literary texts from ancient Egypt as an example for the role literature plays in a literate/illiterate society as a form of human expression in dealing with the big issues in life.
  • critically assess the current scholarly debate on aspects of modern literary theory and its application to ancient Egyptian literature.

Assessment tasks

  • Tutorial Paper
  • Research Essay
  • Final Test (online)

Learning and teaching activities

  • Students participate in presenting information content to the class (Fact File) very week: preparing and engaging with the ancient texts and discussing with the fellow students online; focusing on key themes and analytical approaches.
  • Reading, reflecting, researching and writing the tutorial paper and research essay.

Effective Communication

We want to develop in our students the ability to communicate and convey their views in forms effective with different audiences. We want our graduates to take with them the capability to read, listen, question, gather and evaluate information resources in a variety of formats, assess, write clearly, speak effectively, and to use visual communication and communication technologies as appropriate.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • apply categories of text analysis to the ancient writings.
  • define distinguishing features of ancient literary texts and to compare and contrast them with works of modern world literature.

Assessment tasks

  • Fact File
  • Tutorial Paper
  • Research Essay
  • Participation
  • Final Test (online)

Learning and teaching activities

  • Students participate in presenting information content to the class (Fact File) very week: preparing and engaging with the ancient texts and discussing with the fellow students online; focusing on key themes and analytical approaches.
  • Reading, reflecting, researching and writing the tutorial paper and research essay.
  • Training memory and recall of key facts and elements, contents and themes of ancient Egyptian literature.

Capable of Professional and Personal Judgement and Initiative

We want our graduates to have emotional intelligence and sound interpersonal skills and to demonstrate discernment and common sense in their professional and personal judgement. They will exercise initiative as needed. They will be capable of risk assessment, and be able to handle ambiguity and complexity, enabling them to be adaptable in diverse and changing environments.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • apply categories of text analysis to the ancient writings.
  • define distinguishing features of ancient literary texts and to compare and contrast them with works of modern world literature.
  • respond creatively to select passages to literary texts from ancient Egypt.
  • critically assess the current scholarly debate on aspects of modern literary theory and its application to ancient Egyptian literature.

Assessment tasks

  • Fact File
  • Tutorial Paper
  • Research Essay
  • Participation
  • Final Test (online)

Learning and teaching activities

  • Students participate in presenting information content to the class (Fact File) very week: preparing and engaging with the ancient texts and discussing with the fellow students online; focusing on key themes and analytical approaches.
  • Reading, reflecting, researching and writing the tutorial paper and research essay.

Discipline Specific Knowledge and Skills

Our graduates will take with them the intellectual development, depth and breadth of knowledge, scholarly understanding, and specific subject content in their chosen fields to make them competent and confident in their subject or profession. They will be able to demonstrate, where relevant, professional technical competence and meet professional standards. They will be able to articulate the structure of knowledge of their discipline, be able to adapt discipline-specific knowledge to novel situations, and be able to contribute from their discipline to inter-disciplinary solutions to problems.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • read a representative body of literary texts from ancient Egypt.
  • apply categories of text analysis to the ancient writings.
  • define distinguishing features of ancient literary texts and to compare and contrast them with works of modern world literature.
  • characterize key concepts of the ancient Egyptian world view, society and religion as reflected in the literary writings.

Assessment tasks

  • Fact File
  • Tutorial Paper
  • Quiz online (2)
  • Research Essay
  • Participation
  • Final Test (online)

Learning and teaching activities

  • Every week: prepare and engage with the ancient texts, discuss with fellow students in class.
  • Students participate in presenting information content to the class (Fact File) very week: preparing and engaging with the ancient texts and discussing with the fellow students online; focusing on key themes and analytical approaches.
  • Reading, reflecting, researching and writing the tutorial paper and research essay.
  • Training memory and recall of key facts and elements, contents and themes of ancient Egyptian literature.

Critical, Analytical and Integrative Thinking

We want our graduates to be capable of reasoning, questioning and analysing, and to integrate and synthesise learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments; to be able to critique constraints, assumptions and limitations; to be able to think independently and systemically in relation to scholarly activity, in the workplace, and in the world. We want them to have a level of scientific and information technology literacy.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • apply categories of text analysis to the ancient writings.
  • define distinguishing features of ancient literary texts and to compare and contrast them with works of modern world literature.
  • characterize key concepts of the ancient Egyptian world view, society and religion as reflected in the literary writings.
  • appraise the literary texts from ancient Egypt as an example for the role literature plays in a literate/illiterate society as a form of human expression in dealing with the big issues in life.
  • critically assess the current scholarly debate on aspects of modern literary theory and its application to ancient Egyptian literature.

Assessment tasks

  • Tutorial Paper
  • Research Essay
  • Final Test (online)

Learning and teaching activities

  • Students participate in presenting information content to the class (Fact File) very week: preparing and engaging with the ancient texts and discussing with the fellow students online; focusing on key themes and analytical approaches.
  • Reading, reflecting, researching and writing the tutorial paper and research essay.

Extensions

Extensions can only be granted in exceptional cases and may only be sought in consultation with the unit convenor and before the assignment is due.

Late assignment policy: Assessment tasks / assignments are compulsory and must be submitted on time. As a general rule, extensions will not be granted without a valid and documented reason (e.g. medical certificate). Late submissions will be penalised by 2% for each day (including weekends) the assignment task is late. No assignments will be accepted after assignments have been corrected and feedback has been provided.

Assignment tasks handed in early will not be marked and returned before the due date.

For policy on Special Consideration, see under Policies and Procedures.