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ANTH205 – Islam

2017 – S1 Day

General Information

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Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit Convenor
Gabriele Marranci
Contact via gabriele.marranci@mq.edu.au
+61-2-9850-8040
TBA on iLearn
Credit points Credit points
3
Prerequisites Prerequisites
ANTH150 or (12cp at 100 level or above) or admission to GDipArts
Corequisites Corequisites
Co-badged status Co-badged status
Unit description Unit description
Islam is a major world religion, and the anthropology of Islam an exciting enterprise that studies the lived experience of Islam and Muslims in a variety of contexts and different places. One unifying theme of the unit is its focus on the production of knowledge about Islam in the present, asking questions about who speaks for and in the name of Islam. This includes a stress on the representation and control of Islam, not just in the West but also in Muslim majority societies as well. Students are able to research a number of vital topics, including: media coverage of Islam; the fascinating debates around the category and form of the Islamic City; the production of Islam in the Museums of Islamic Art (from Istanbul to New York); Muslim cinema; Gender and Islam; the nationalisation of Islam by secular States such as Turkey; and Islam and Music.

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at http://students.mq.edu.au/student_admin/enrolmentguide/academicdates/

Learning Outcomes

  1. Discover and appreciate the variety of Muslim societies and communities in different countries including Australia.
  2. Understand the position of Muslims in contemporary societies as well as the variegate cultural differences among Muslims.
  3. Explore the role of social settings and norms in shaping Muslim communities through comparative research.
  4. Actively participate in discussion and debate about a range of topics in the anthropology of Islam, some of which have everyday connections and relevance.
  5. Obtain greater understanding of diverse methodologies and anthropological techniques such as ethnography, field-based techniques, and comparative approaches to Muslim societies.
  6. Investigate in greater depth one area of special interest in the study of anthropology of Islam through personal research.
  7. Improve presentation and oral expression skills through tutorial discussions of critical issues in the anthropology of Islam
  8. Improve writing and critical reading skills through online questions and answers.

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Due
Tutorial 20% weekly from week 2
Online Quizz 1 20% Week 6
Quizz 2 10% week 10
Final Exam 50% Exam Week TBA

Tutorial

Due: weekly from week 2
Weighting: 20%

Students are expected to have done the readings for the week prior to the tutorial and be active contributors to the discussion 

Students may miss one tutorial without needing an excuse. 

Students who DO NOT ATTEND 80% of the tutorials without an approved Disruption of Studies will not be admitted to the final exam. 


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Discover and appreciate the variety of Muslim societies and communities in different countries including Australia.
  • Understand the position of Muslims in contemporary societies as well as the variegate cultural differences among Muslims.
  • Explore the role of social settings and norms in shaping Muslim communities through comparative research.
  • Actively participate in discussion and debate about a range of topics in the anthropology of Islam, some of which have everyday connections and relevance.
  • Obtain greater understanding of diverse methodologies and anthropological techniques such as ethnography, field-based techniques, and comparative approaches to Muslim societies.
  • Investigate in greater depth one area of special interest in the study of anthropology of Islam through personal research.
  • Improve presentation and oral expression skills through tutorial discussions of critical issues in the anthropology of Islam

Online Quizz 1

Due: Week 6
Weighting: 20%

Students will take the quizzes online on iLearn. 

Quizzes will consist of 20  multiple choice or true/false questions that focus on the readings.

Students will have a 48-hour window in which to complete the work. The quiz will be timed, however, once the student opens the assignment online through iLearn. The quiz will not be repeated for any reason. More information will be provided on iLearn. 


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Investigate in greater depth one area of special interest in the study of anthropology of Islam through personal research.
  • Improve writing and critical reading skills through online questions and answers.

Quizz 2

Due: week 10
Weighting: 10%

Students will take the quizzes online on iLearn. 

 

Quizzes will consist of approximately 10  multiple choice or true/false questions that focus on the readings.

 

Students will have a 48-hour window in which to complete the work. The quiz will be timed, however, once the student opens the assignment online through iLearn. The quiz will not be repeated for any reason. More information will be provided on iLearn. 


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Investigate in greater depth one area of special interest in the study of anthropology of Islam through personal research.
  • Improve writing and critical reading skills through online questions and answers.

Final Exam

Due: Exam Week TBA
Weighting: 50%

Students who have not attended the minimum number  of tutorials without an approved Disruption of Studies will not be admitted to the exam

The exam consists of 50  multiple choices and true and false questions to be answered in 1 hour and 10 min that cover the entire course and readings.

 It will be held during the examination period  The precise date will be posted by the university eight weeks before the exam in draft form, and in final form approximately four weeks before the examinations commence.

http://www.timetables.mq.edu.au/exam.

Please do not schedule any out of town engagements during this entire period, as per the university’s overall policy. As soon as the convenor receives notice of the date, time, and location of the final exam, he will announce and post the information on iLearn. Also information can be found here http://students.mq.edu.au/student_admin/exams/

 


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Explore the role of social settings and norms in shaping Muslim communities through comparative research.
  • Obtain greater understanding of diverse methodologies and anthropological techniques such as ethnography, field-based techniques, and comparative approaches to Muslim societies.
  • Improve writing and critical reading skills through online questions and answers.

Delivery and Resources

Technology used and required

Students will need to have access to iLearn in order to complete the online assignments. Especially in the case of the quizzes, we suggest that students find a high-speed, secure internet connection. 

At times, iLearn can be slow to reload, so students will find that, especially if their connection is weak, they may be under unnecessary stress. 

All lectures are recorded, and many of the materials made use of in class are available through iLearn however, this course has a text book that for copyright reasons cannot be distributed through iLearn: 

 Gabriele Marranci 

The Anthropology of Islam 

Publisher: Bloomsbury Academic ISBN-10: 1845202856

Lecture and Tutorial times.

 

Please see the university timetable for your updated Lecture and Tutorials times. Also they will be posted on iLearn. 

 

Teaching and Learning Strategy

Detailed information, including what you can expect from the lecturers and what they will expect from you, can be found on iLearn.  

Unit Schedule

Note

Although the rest of the readings will be available on iLearn, this course has a text book which, for copyright reasons, cannot be added to iLearn. The text book is: 

 

Author: Gabriele Marranci 

Title: The Anthropology of Islam 

Publisher: Bloomsbury Academic

Year 2008 

ISBN 1845202856 (paperback). 

 

It is highly suggested to buy the book, which should be available at our university book shop (the is also a Kindle version and it is not difficult to find second hand copies). 

 

Week 1 

Introduction 

The lecture will provide a general overview of the course and an introduction to studying Muslims and Islam. The lecture follows Chapter 1 of the text book. 

Compulsory Readings 

Chapter 1 of The Anthropology of Islam

Lukens-Bull, Ronald A. "Between Text and Practice: Considerations in the Anthropological Study of Islam." Marburg Journal of Religion 4.2 (1999): 1-21.

 

Week 2

Islam: Beliefs, History and Rituals 

This lecture provides a short overview of the basic elements of Islam, including its history and rituals 

Compulsory Readings 

Chapter 2 of the Anthropology of Islam 

Hughes, A. W. (2014). Theorizing Islam: Disciplinary Deconstruction and Reconstruction. Routledge.- Chapter 2

Week

From Studying Islam to Studying Muslims 

The lecture will focus on the differences between the study of Islam as a religion and the study of Islam from an anthropological perspective. In particular, we will discuss the different approaches to the study of Muslims and their religion that have been developed in the last 40 years and the challenges faced by an anthropology of Islam. 

Compulsory Readings 

Chapter 3 - The anthropology of Islam 

Varisco, D. M. (2005). Islam obscured: The rhetoric of anthropological representation. New York: Palgrave Macmillan. Ch 1, pp 1-20. 

Week 4

Studying Muslims in the West: before and after September 11

The lecture will focus on Muslims in the west, the impact of migration and the challenges an anthropologist may encounter in studying Islam and Muslims in the West, including in Australia

Compulsory Readings 

Chapter 4 - The Anthropology of Islam 

Stephenson, P. (2011). Indigenous Australia's Pilgrimage to Islam. Journal of Intercultural Studies, 32(3), 261-277.

Week 5 

From the Exotic to the Familiar: Anamneses of Fieldwork among Muslims 

This lecture will focus on how anthropology studies Muslim communities and looks at different experiences of fieldwork, including the challenges that anthropologists may face. 

Compulsory Readings 

Chapter 5 - The Anthropology of Islam 

D'Alisera, J. (1999). Field of Dreams: The Anthropologist Far Away at Home. Anthropology and Humanism, 24(1), 5-19.

Week 6  

Beyond the Stereotype: Challenges in Understanding Muslim Identities 

This lecture discusses the relevance of understanding Muslim identities by avoiding stereotypes. It will focus on anthropological theories of identity and also how we can avoid the mistake of considering Islam to be monolithic. 

Compulsory Readings 

Chapter 6 - The Anthropology of Islam 

Peek, L. (2005). Becoming Muslim: The development of a religious identity. Sociology of Religion, 66(3), 215-242.

Week 7 

The Ummah Paradox 

This lecture explores the meaning of ummah (the Muslim community as a religious unity) and the problematic aspects related to its study, including the actual complexity of the concept itself. 

Compulsory Readings 

Chapter 7 - The Anthropology of Islam 

Van Nieuwenhuijze, C. A. O. (1959). The Ummah: An Analytic Approach. Studia Islamica, (10), 5-22.

Week 8

Dynamics of Gender in Islam 

This lecture explores the complexity of gender and sexuality within the Muslim community and in particular the scholarly debate within the anthropological study of Muslims. 

Compulsory Readings 

Chapter 8 - The anthropology of Islam 

Week 9

Guest Lecture by Dr G. Scott on Muslims women in the work market 

Compulsory Readings  TBA

Week 10

Discussing Islamic fundamentalism 

This lecture will discuss the debate about Islamic fundamentalism and how we can understand the phenomenon from an anthropological perspective. In particular, the lecture debates whether the concept of fundamentalism as an analytical term is useful of not. 

Compulsory Readings 

Marranci, G. (2009). 'Fundamentalism Debated' in G. Marranci Understanding Muslim identity: rethinking fundamentalism, New York, London, Palgrve, pp. 26-50. 

Emerson, M. O., & Hartman, D. (2006). The rise of religious fundamentalism. Annual Review of Sociology, 127-144.

 

Week 11

Youth, Identity and redicalizaion: an Anthropological Study and Interpretation 

This lecture discuss why some young people may radicalise as far as religious identities is concerned. It is based on my research and aims to help students to see how anthropologist may approach the discussion and the methodology of study radicalisation in a different way    

Compulsory Readings  

G. Marranci Wars of Terror, London and New York, Bloomsbury - Chapter 6 

Week 12  (No tutorial for this week) 

Conclusions 

In this lecture we will summarize the main points we have covered during the course and try to see where this journey in the study of Muslims from an anthropological viewpoint has brought us. 

Compulsory Readings 

Chapter 9 - The Anthropology of Islam  

 

Week 13 (revision week: no Lecture or Tutorial) 

 

 

Policies and Procedures

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central. Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Academic Honesty Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/academic_honesty/policy.html

Assessment Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/assessment/policy_2016.html

Grade Appeal Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/gradeappeal/policy.html

Complaint Management Procedure for Students and Members of the Public http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/complaint_management/procedure.html​

Disruption to Studies Policy http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/disruption_studies/policy.html The Disruption to Studies Policy is effective from March 3 2014 and replaces the Special Consideration Policy.

In addition, a number of other policies can be found in the Learning and Teaching Category of Policy Central.

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/support/student_conduct/

Results

Results shown in iLearn, or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent. For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au.

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Learning Skills

Learning Skills (mq.edu.au/learningskills) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to improve your marks and take control of your study.

Student Enquiry Service

For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at ask.mq.edu.au

Equity Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

IT Help

For help with University computer systems and technology, visit http://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/information_technology/help/

When using the University's IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use of IT Resources Policy. The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network including students.

Graduate Capabilities

Critical, Analytical and Integrative Thinking

We want our graduates to be capable of reasoning, questioning and analysing, and to integrate and synthesise learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments; to be able to critique constraints, assumptions and limitations; to be able to think independently and systemically in relation to scholarly activity, in the workplace, and in the world. We want them to have a level of scientific and information technology literacy.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Understand the position of Muslims in contemporary societies as well as the variegate cultural differences among Muslims.
  • Explore the role of social settings and norms in shaping Muslim communities through comparative research.
  • Actively participate in discussion and debate about a range of topics in the anthropology of Islam, some of which have everyday connections and relevance.
  • Investigate in greater depth one area of special interest in the study of anthropology of Islam through personal research.

Assessment task

  • Tutorial

Creative and Innovative

Our graduates will also be capable of creative thinking and of creating knowledge. They will be imaginative and open to experience and capable of innovation at work and in the community. We want them to be engaged in applying their critical, creative thinking.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Explore the role of social settings and norms in shaping Muslim communities through comparative research.
  • Actively participate in discussion and debate about a range of topics in the anthropology of Islam, some of which have everyday connections and relevance.
  • Investigate in greater depth one area of special interest in the study of anthropology of Islam through personal research.
  • Improve presentation and oral expression skills through tutorial discussions of critical issues in the anthropology of Islam
  • Improve writing and critical reading skills through online questions and answers.

Capable of Professional and Personal Judgement and Initiative

We want our graduates to have emotional intelligence and sound interpersonal skills and to demonstrate discernment and common sense in their professional and personal judgement. They will exercise initiative as needed. They will be capable of risk assessment, and be able to handle ambiguity and complexity, enabling them to be adaptable in diverse and changing environments.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Understand the position of Muslims in contemporary societies as well as the variegate cultural differences among Muslims.
  • Explore the role of social settings and norms in shaping Muslim communities through comparative research.
  • Actively participate in discussion and debate about a range of topics in the anthropology of Islam, some of which have everyday connections and relevance.
  • Investigate in greater depth one area of special interest in the study of anthropology of Islam through personal research.
  • Improve presentation and oral expression skills through tutorial discussions of critical issues in the anthropology of Islam
  • Improve writing and critical reading skills through online questions and answers.

Assessment tasks

  • Tutorial
  • Online Quizz 1
  • Quizz 2
  • Final Exam

Discipline Specific Knowledge and Skills

Our graduates will take with them the intellectual development, depth and breadth of knowledge, scholarly understanding, and specific subject content in their chosen fields to make them competent and confident in their subject or profession. They will be able to demonstrate, where relevant, professional technical competence and meet professional standards. They will be able to articulate the structure of knowledge of their discipline, be able to adapt discipline-specific knowledge to novel situations, and be able to contribute from their discipline to inter-disciplinary solutions to problems.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Discover and appreciate the variety of Muslim societies and communities in different countries including Australia.
  • Understand the position of Muslims in contemporary societies as well as the variegate cultural differences among Muslims.
  • Actively participate in discussion and debate about a range of topics in the anthropology of Islam, some of which have everyday connections and relevance.
  • Obtain greater understanding of diverse methodologies and anthropological techniques such as ethnography, field-based techniques, and comparative approaches to Muslim societies.
  • Improve presentation and oral expression skills through tutorial discussions of critical issues in the anthropology of Islam
  • Improve writing and critical reading skills through online questions and answers.

Assessment tasks

  • Tutorial
  • Online Quizz 1
  • Quizz 2
  • Final Exam

Problem Solving and Research Capability

Our graduates should be capable of researching; of analysing, and interpreting and assessing data and information in various forms; of drawing connections across fields of knowledge; and they should be able to relate their knowledge to complex situations at work or in the world, in order to diagnose and solve problems. We want them to have the confidence to take the initiative in doing so, within an awareness of their own limitations.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Understand the position of Muslims in contemporary societies as well as the variegate cultural differences among Muslims.
  • Explore the role of social settings and norms in shaping Muslim communities through comparative research.
  • Obtain greater understanding of diverse methodologies and anthropological techniques such as ethnography, field-based techniques, and comparative approaches to Muslim societies.
  • Improve presentation and oral expression skills through tutorial discussions of critical issues in the anthropology of Islam
  • Improve writing and critical reading skills through online questions and answers.

Assessment tasks

  • Tutorial
  • Online Quizz 1
  • Quizz 2
  • Final Exam

Effective Communication

We want to develop in our students the ability to communicate and convey their views in forms effective with different audiences. We want our graduates to take with them the capability to read, listen, question, gather and evaluate information resources in a variety of formats, assess, write clearly, speak effectively, and to use visual communication and communication technologies as appropriate.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Actively participate in discussion and debate about a range of topics in the anthropology of Islam, some of which have everyday connections and relevance.
  • Improve presentation and oral expression skills through tutorial discussions of critical issues in the anthropology of Islam
  • Improve writing and critical reading skills through online questions and answers.

Assessment tasks

  • Tutorial
  • Final Exam

Engaged and Ethical Local and Global citizens

As local citizens our graduates will be aware of indigenous perspectives and of the nation's historical context. They will be engaged with the challenges of contemporary society and with knowledge and ideas. We want our graduates to have respect for diversity, to be open-minded, sensitive to others and inclusive, and to be open to other cultures and perspectives: they should have a level of cultural literacy. Our graduates should be aware of disadvantage and social justice, and be willing to participate to help create a wiser and better society.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Discover and appreciate the variety of Muslim societies and communities in different countries including Australia.
  • Understand the position of Muslims in contemporary societies as well as the variegate cultural differences among Muslims.
  • Explore the role of social settings and norms in shaping Muslim communities through comparative research.
  • Actively participate in discussion and debate about a range of topics in the anthropology of Islam, some of which have everyday connections and relevance.
  • Investigate in greater depth one area of special interest in the study of anthropology of Islam through personal research.

Assessment task

  • Tutorial

Socially and Environmentally Active and Responsible

We want our graduates to be aware of and have respect for self and others; to be able to work with others as a leader and a team player; to have a sense of connectedness with others and country; and to have a sense of mutual obligation. Our graduates should be informed and active participants in moving society towards sustainability.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Understand the position of Muslims in contemporary societies as well as the variegate cultural differences among Muslims.
  • Actively participate in discussion and debate about a range of topics in the anthropology of Islam, some of which have everyday connections and relevance.
  • Investigate in greater depth one area of special interest in the study of anthropology of Islam through personal research.

Commitment to Continuous Learning

Our graduates will have enquiring minds and a literate curiosity which will lead them to pursue knowledge for its own sake. They will continue to pursue learning in their careers and as they participate in the world. They will be capable of reflecting on their experiences and relationships with others and the environment, learning from them, and growing - personally, professionally and socially.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Discover and appreciate the variety of Muslim societies and communities in different countries including Australia.
  • Understand the position of Muslims in contemporary societies as well as the variegate cultural differences among Muslims.
  • Explore the role of social settings and norms in shaping Muslim communities through comparative research.
  • Obtain greater understanding of diverse methodologies and anthropological techniques such as ethnography, field-based techniques, and comparative approaches to Muslim societies.
  • Improve presentation and oral expression skills through tutorial discussions of critical issues in the anthropology of Islam
  • Improve writing and critical reading skills through online questions and answers.

Assessment tasks

  • Tutorial
  • Online Quizz 1
  • Quizz 2
  • Final Exam