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APPL926 – Language Teaching and Learning Beyond the Classroom

2017 – S2 Day

General Information

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Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff Lecturer
Phil Benson
Contact via 9850 8756
C5A 514
Margaret Wood
Credit points Credit points
4
Prerequisites Prerequisites
Admission to MAppLingTESOL or MAppLing
Corequisites Corequisites
Co-badged status Co-badged status
Unit description Unit description
Language learning beyond the language classroom plays a crucial role in the development of high levels of language proficiency. Increasing attention to language learning beyond the classroom is also influencing thinking on key concepts in Second Language Acquisition (SLA) research that have hitherto been based largely on classroom research. In this course, students will explore recent research on language learning beyond the classroom, and examine its impact on SLA. Emphasising an ecological view of relationships between out-of-class learning and in-class learning, the course will cover the roles of intentional and incidental learning inside and outside the classroom, debates on the need for instruction in SLA, and the implications of research on language learning beyond the classroom for our understanding of the concepts of autonomy, learning strategies and motivation.

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at http://students.mq.edu.au/student_admin/enrolmentguide/academicdates/

Learning Outcomes

  1. Articulate the contribution of in-class and out-of-class activities to their own second language learning
  2. Explain key terms and concepts that have been developed to account for language learning beyond the classroom
  3. Demonstrate an in-depth understanding of distinctions between intentional and incidental, explicit and implicit learning and their application to a range of in-class and out-of-class learning activities.
  4. Critically evaluate research literature on autonomy, learning strategies and motivation from the perspective of language learning beyond the classroom.
  5. Apply a theoretical understanding of ecologies of language learning to the learning of a particular individual or group of language learners

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Due
Language learning history 20% 14/08/2017
Concept check 30% 13/09/2017
Independent inquiry project 50% 20/11/2017

Language learning history

Due: 14/08/2017
Weighting: 20%

Write your own language learning history, focusing on the relative contributions of in-class and out-of-class activities to your learning of one or more second or foreign languages.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Articulate the contribution of in-class and out-of-class activities to their own second language learning

Concept check

Due: 13/09/2017
Weighting: 30%

An online, short-answer quiz on concepts introduced in the first 6 sessions of the course.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Explain key terms and concepts that have been developed to account for language learning beyond the classroom
  • Demonstrate an in-depth understanding of distinctions between intentional and incidental, explicit and implicit learning and their application to a range of in-class and out-of-class learning activities.

Independent inquiry project

Due: 20/11/2017
Weighting: 50%

A report describing and analyzing the language learning of an individual or group of language learners from a language learning ecology perspective. The report should include a short literature review on key terms and theoretical concepts (500-750 words). The main body of the report should be based on an independent inquiry project and consist of an analytical description of the individual’s/group’s language learning, based on observation, interview or survey data.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Explain key terms and concepts that have been developed to account for language learning beyond the classroom
  • Critically evaluate research literature on autonomy, learning strategies and motivation from the perspective of language learning beyond the classroom.
  • Apply a theoretical understanding of ecologies of language learning to the learning of a particular individual or group of language learners

Delivery and Resources

2 hour interactive lecture.

Students are expected to read the assigned readings before each lecture. All readings are available online through the University Library catalogue.

Unit Schedule

 

Date

Week

Title

Topics

Pre-reading

 

A

Experiences and key concepts

 

 

03 Aug

1.

Language learning histories

Telling our own language learning histories; the roles of in-class and out-of-class learning

Oxford (1996)

10 Aug

2.

Mapping language learning beyond the classroom

(Assessment 1: Language Learning History.

Deadline – 14 Aug)

 

What is language learning beyond the classroom and why is it important? Key concepts and terms.

Benson (2011)

17 Aug

3.

How are languages learned?

What is involved in learning a second language? How much is learned outside the classroom and what are the roles of instruction?

Ellis (2008)

Cole & Vanderplank (2016)

 

B

Learners

 

 

24 Aug

4.

Learner autonomy

What does it mean to be an autonomous learner? How is autonomy related to learning beyond the classroom?

Benson (2013)

Illés (2012)

31 Aug

5.

Learning strategies

 

How do language learners plan and carry out learning beyond the classroom?

Griffiths (2014)

Pickard (1996)

07 Sep

6.

 

Motivation and identity

(Assessment 2: Online quiz.

Deadline – 13 Sep)

How are researchers are rethinking language learning motivation in the light of new ideas on identity and learning beyond the classroom?

Ushioda (2011)

Lamb (2011)

 

C

Settings

 

 

14 Sep

7.

Ecologies of language learning

How is language learning related to settings and resources? What roles do learners play in seeking out or creating their own contexts for learning?

Barron (2006)

Palfreyman (2014)

05 Oct

8.

Spaces and places

A closer look at settings for language learning beyond the classroom in the light of new thinking on the semiotics of place.

Murray et al (2013)

Kuure (2011)

12 Oct

9.

Social networks

A closer look at the social dimensions of language learning beyond the classroom from the perspective of social network theory

Palfreyman (2011)

Kurata (2010)19

19 Oct

10.

Learning in and out-of-class

What is the relationship between in-class and out-of-class learning for learners who spend much of their learning time in class?

Lai (2015)

Lai et al (2015)

 

 

Technologies

 

 

26 Oct

11.

Language learning and the internet

How are language learners using new technologies to learn languages? Are they doing more that we think?

Sockett & Toffoli (2012)

Lamy & Mangenot (2013)

02 Nov

12.

Mobile devices

Do mobile devices represent the future of language learning beyond the classroom?

Beatty (2013)

Osborne (2014)

 

E

Moving forward

 

 

9 Nov

13.

Research issues in language learning beyond the classroom

(Assessment 3: Independent Inquiry Project.

Deadline – 20 Nov)

What are the challenges involved in researching learning beyond the classroom and what research methods are most appropriate?

Richards (2015)

 

Policies and Procedures

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central. Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Academic Honesty Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/academic_honesty/policy.html

Assessment Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/assessment/policy_2016.html

Grade Appeal Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/gradeappeal/policy.html

Complaint Management Procedure for Students and Members of the Public http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/complaint_management/procedure.html​

Disruption to Studies Policy http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/disruption_studies/policy.html The Disruption to Studies Policy is effective from March 3 2014 and replaces the Special Consideration Policy.

In addition, a number of other policies can be found in the Learning and Teaching Category of Policy Central.

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/support/student_conduct/

Results

Results shown in iLearn, or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent. For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au.

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Learning Skills

Learning Skills (mq.edu.au/learningskills) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to improve your marks and take control of your study.

Student Enquiry Service

For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at ask.mq.edu.au

Equity Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

IT Help

For help with University computer systems and technology, visit http://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/information_technology/help/

When using the University's IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use of IT Resources Policy. The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network including students.

Graduate Capabilities

PG - Capable of Professional and Personal Judgment and Initiative

Our postgraduates will demonstrate a high standard of discernment and common sense in their professional and personal judgment. They will have the ability to make informed choices and decisions that reflect both the nature of their professional work and their personal perspectives.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • Apply a theoretical understanding of ecologies of language learning to the learning of a particular individual or group of language learners

Assessment task

  • Independent inquiry project

PG - Discipline Knowledge and Skills

Our postgraduates will be able to demonstrate a significantly enhanced depth and breadth of knowledge, scholarly understanding, and specific subject content knowledge in their chosen fields.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Explain key terms and concepts that have been developed to account for language learning beyond the classroom
  • Demonstrate an in-depth understanding of distinctions between intentional and incidental, explicit and implicit learning and their application to a range of in-class and out-of-class learning activities.
  • Critically evaluate research literature on autonomy, learning strategies and motivation from the perspective of language learning beyond the classroom.
  • Apply a theoretical understanding of ecologies of language learning to the learning of a particular individual or group of language learners

Assessment tasks

  • Concept check
  • Independent inquiry project

PG - Critical, Analytical and Integrative Thinking

Our postgraduates will be capable of utilising and reflecting on prior knowledge and experience, of applying higher level critical thinking skills, and of integrating and synthesising learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments. A characteristic of this form of thinking is the generation of new, professionally oriented knowledge through personal or group-based critique of practice and theory.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Articulate the contribution of in-class and out-of-class activities to their own second language learning
  • Explain key terms and concepts that have been developed to account for language learning beyond the classroom
  • Demonstrate an in-depth understanding of distinctions between intentional and incidental, explicit and implicit learning and their application to a range of in-class and out-of-class learning activities.
  • Critically evaluate research literature on autonomy, learning strategies and motivation from the perspective of language learning beyond the classroom.
  • Apply a theoretical understanding of ecologies of language learning to the learning of a particular individual or group of language learners

Assessment tasks

  • Language learning history
  • Concept check
  • Independent inquiry project

PG - Research and Problem Solving Capability

Our postgraduates will be capable of systematic enquiry; able to use research skills to create new knowledge that can be applied to real world issues, or contribute to a field of study or practice to enhance society. They will be capable of creative questioning, problem finding and problem solving.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Critically evaluate research literature on autonomy, learning strategies and motivation from the perspective of language learning beyond the classroom.
  • Apply a theoretical understanding of ecologies of language learning to the learning of a particular individual or group of language learners

Assessment task

  • Independent inquiry project

PG - Effective Communication

Our postgraduates will be able to communicate effectively and convey their views to different social, cultural, and professional audiences. They will be able to use a variety of technologically supported media to communicate with empathy using a range of written, spoken or visual formats.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Articulate the contribution of in-class and out-of-class activities to their own second language learning
  • Explain key terms and concepts that have been developed to account for language learning beyond the classroom
  • Demonstrate an in-depth understanding of distinctions between intentional and incidental, explicit and implicit learning and their application to a range of in-class and out-of-class learning activities.
  • Critically evaluate research literature on autonomy, learning strategies and motivation from the perspective of language learning beyond the classroom.
  • Apply a theoretical understanding of ecologies of language learning to the learning of a particular individual or group of language learners

Assessment tasks

  • Language learning history
  • Concept check
  • Independent inquiry project

PG - Engaged and Responsible, Active and Ethical Citizens

Our postgraduates will be ethically aware and capable of confident transformative action in relation to their professional responsibilities and the wider community. They will have a sense of connectedness with others and country and have a sense of mutual obligation. They will be able to appreciate the impact of their professional roles for social justice and inclusion related to national and global issues

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • Apply a theoretical understanding of ecologies of language learning to the learning of a particular individual or group of language learners

Assessment task

  • Independent inquiry project

Pre-readings

Barron, B. (2006). Interest and self-sustained learning as catalysts of development: A learning ecology perspective. Human Development, 49, 193-224.

Beatty, K. (2013). Beyond the classroom: Mobile learning the wider world. The International Research Foundation for English Language Education. (Online – use Google to search for title)

Benson, P. (2011). Language learning and teaching beyond the classroom: An introduction to the field. In P. Benson & H. Reinders (eds.), Beyond the language classroom (pp. 7-16). Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.

Benson, P. (2013). Autonomy in language teaching and learning: How to do it ‘here’. Unpublished paper. (Download from Dropbox link: https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/61188845/Benson%20Autonomy%20How%20To%20Do%20It%20Here.pdf)

Cole, J., and Vanderplank, R. (2016). Comparing autonomous and class-based learners in Brazil: Evidence for the present-day advantages of informal out-of-class learning. System, 61, 31-42.

Ellis, N. C. (2008). Implicit and explicit knowledge of language. In J. Cenoz & N. H. Hornberger (Eds), Encyclopedia of language and education. Volume 6: Knowledge about language. New York, NY: Springer, 1–13. (Online – use Google to search for title)

Griffiths, C. (2013). The twenty-first century landscape of language learning strategies. System, 43 (1), 1-10.

Illés, E. (2012). Learner autonomy revisited. ELT Journal, 66 (4), 505-513.

Kurata, N. (2010). Opportunities for foreign language learning and use within a learner's informal social networks. Mind, Culture, and Activity, 17 (4), 382-396.

Kuure, L. (2011). Places for learning: Technology-mediated language learning practices beyond the classroom. In P. Benson & H. Reinders (eds.), Beyond the language classroom (pp. 35-46). Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.

Lai, C. (2015). Perceiving and traversing in-class and out-of-class learning: Accounts from language learners in Hong Kong. Innovation in Language Learning and Teaching, 9 (3), 265-284.

Lai, C., Zhu, W. & Gong, G. (2015). Understanding the quality of out-of-class English learning. TESOL Quarterly 49 (2), 278-308.

Lamb, M. (2011). Future selves, motivation and autonomy in long-term EFL learning trajectories. In G. Murray, A. Gao, and T. Lamb (Eds.), Identity, motivation and autonomy in language learning (pp. 177-194). Bristol: Multilingual Matters.

Lamy, M-N. & Mangenot, F. (2013). In M-N. Lamy, & K. Zourou (eds.), Social media-based language learning: Insights from research and practice. Social networking for language education (pp. 197-213). Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.

Murray, G., Fujishima, N. & Uzuki, M. (2014). The semiotics of place: Autonomy and space. In G. Murray (ed.), Social dimensions of autonomy in language learning (pp. 81-99). Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.

Nunan, D., and Richards, J. C. (Eds.) (2015). Language learning beyond the classroom. London: Routledge.

Osborne, M. (2013). An autoethnographic study of the use of mobile devices to support foreign language vocabulary learning. Studies in Self-Access Learning Journal, 4 (4), 295-307.

Oxford, R. L. (1996). When emotion meets metacognition in language learning histories. International Journal of Educational Research, 23(7), 581-594.

Palfreyman, D. M. (2011). Family, friends, and learning beyond the classroom: Social networks and social capital in language learning. In P. Benson and H. Reinders (Eds.), Beyond the language classroom (pp. 17-34). Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.

Palfreyman, D. (2014). The ecology of learner autonomy. In G. Murray (ed.), Social dimensions of autonomy in language learning (pp. 175-191). Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.

Pickard, N. (1996). Out-of-class language learning strategies. ELT Journal, 50 (2), 150-159.

Richards, J. (2015). The changing face of language learning: learning beyond the classroom. RELC Journal 46 (1), 5-22.

Sockett, G., and Toffoli, D. (2012). Beyond learner autonomy: A dynamic systems view of the informal learning of English in virtual online communities. ReCALL, 24 (2), 138-151.

Ushioda, E. (2011). Language learning motivation, self and identity: Current theoretical perspectives. Computer Assisted Language Learning, 24 (3), 199–210.