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ECHE330 – PDPHE/HSIE

2017 – S2 Day

General Information

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Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff
Dean Dudley
Tutor
Raewyn Burden
Lecturer/Tutor
Susan Caldis
Credit points Credit points
3
Prerequisites Prerequisites
ECH130 and ECHE340
Corequisites Corequisites
Co-badged status Co-badged status
Unit description Unit description
Students explore the world and their place in it, thereby promoting critical awareness and appreciation of History/ HSIE and PDHPE, along with cross-curricular links. This unit examines professional and pedagogical approaches to K-6 students' learning about ‘democratic and socially just practices’, recognising ‘shared heritage’, ‘multiple perspectives and viewpoints’ about history, human society and the environment. This unit also addresses the Active, Dance, Games and Sports, Gymnastics and interpersonal relationships strands in the PDHPE K-6 syllabus. The 5 skills are also examined to ensure the student teacher unpacks strategies for developing positive healthy attitudes in students. Student teachers develop skills and knowledge in planning, teaching and evaluating students' learning in PDHPE and HSIE/History across the K-6 context.

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at http://students.mq.edu.au/student_admin/enrolmentguide/academicdates/

Learning Outcomes

  1. Articulate theoretical and ecological understandings of citizenship, social justice and democracy across contextual layers and diverse groups
  2. Explain the multiple historical and cultural perspectives and viewpoints – focussing on childhood, environments, societies and histories in global contexts and in Australia.
  3. Plan and assess learning experiences focusing on historical content, skills, values and attitudes in an integrated manner including understanding of strategies for differentiating teaching to meet the diverse learning needs of students
  4. Examine learning of ‘shared heritage’ with students, families and community – identifying strategies for extending learning beyond the classroom.
  5. Identify the five essential skills that students develop from PDHPE.
  6. Promote students’ positive healthy decision making and the engagement of all students in an active lifestyle
  7. Participate in programs that develop the pre-service teacher’s skills in human movement and sports skills, gymnastics, aquatics and interpersonal skills.
  8. Plan and assess health focused experiences in the areas of personal development, health and physical activity.

General Assessment Information

Assignment submission

Assignment 1, 2 & 3 must be submitted initially via Turnitin and then in hardcopy to your tutor in your workshop/tutorial the week it is due. Your Turnitin summary must be attached as a coversheet and must NOT be placed in plastic sleeves or folders. Students must download and attach a Turnitin check and cover sheet from http://www.humansciences.mq.edu.au/current_students/undergraduate/assessment_cover_sheet

All hard copy assessments MUST be word processed in coherent English and be free of grammatical, spelling and typographical errors. High standards of presentation are expected. All assessments must be referenced according to the APA style. Assessments must NOT be placed in plastic sleeves or display folders. Assessments will not be accepted via FAX or email attachment.  For ease and uniformity of presentation students are requested to use a clear font style (not italics) such as Times New Roman, Arial, Palatino or Calibri in 10-12 size 1.5 spacing and 2.0 cm margins. Students are encouraged to print on A4 white paper and submit the assessment using double sided rather than single sided print. Additional blank pages or dividers to separate sections are NOT required.  All assessments must also include a ‘header’ or ‘footer’ on each page detailing student name, student number, unit number and assessment number.

Assignment extensions and late penalties

Applications for extensions must be made via AskMQ at https://ask.mq.edu.au as a "Disruption to Studies" request before the submission date. Students who experience a disruption to their studies through ill-health or misadventure are able to apply for this request. Extensions can only be granted if they meet the Disruption to Studies policy and are submitted via ask.mq.edu.au. This will ensure consistency in the consideration of such requests is maintained.

In general, there should be no need for extensions except through illness or misadventure that would be categorised as unavoidable disruption according to the University definition of same, and currently available at:

http://students.mq.edu.au/student_admin/exams/disruption_to_studies/

Late submissions without extension will receive a penalty of 5% reduction of the total possible mark for each day late (including weekends and public holidays). You are reminded that submitting even just 1 day late could be the difference between passing and failing a unit. Late penalties are applied by unit convenors or their delegates after tasks are assessed.

No assessable work will be accepted after the return/release of marked work on the same topic. If a student is still permitted to submit on the basis of unavoidable disruption, an alternative topic may be set.

Students should keep an electronic file of all assessments. Claims regarding "lost" assessments cannot be made if the file cannot be produced. It is also advisable to keep an electronic file of all drafts and the final submission on a USB untouched/unopened after submission. This can be used to demonstrate easily that the assessment has not been amended after the submission date.

 

Assessment Presentation & Submission Guidelines

Please follow these guidelines when you submit each assignment:

  • Allow a left and right-hand margin of at least 2cm in all assignments.

  • Please type all assignments using 12-point font and 1.5 spacing.

  • All assessments must be submitted through Turnitin in .doc or .pdf format for submission.

  • It is the onus of the student to ensure that all assessments are successfully submitted through Turnitin.

  • Faculty assignment cover sheets are NOT required.

 

Draft Submissions & Turnitin Originality Reports

  • Students may use Turnitin’s Originality Report as a learning tool to improve their academic writing if this option is made available in the unit.

  • Students are strongly encouraged to upload a draft copy of each assessment to Turnitin at least one week prior to the due date to obtain an Originality Report.

  • The Originality Report provides students with a similarity index that may indicate if plagiarism has occurred. Students will be able to make amendments to their drafts prior to their final submission on the due date.

  • Generally, one Originality Report is generated every 24 hours up to the due date.

 

When preparing your assignments, it is essential that:

  • Students regularly save a copy of all assignments before submission,

  • Unless there are exceptional circumstances, no assessment will be accepted after the date that the assessment has been returned to other students.

  • If an assessment is considered to be below passing standard, another staff member on the unit will provide a second opinion. No failed assessment may be re-submitted.

 

Final Submissions

  • Students are responsible for checking that their submission has been successful and has been submitted by the due date and time.

  • Late submissions due to last minute technical difficulties may incur a lateness penalty.

Appealing an assignment grade (requesting a re-mark)

If you have evidence that your task has been incorrectly assessed against the grade descriptors you can request a remark.  To request a remark you need to contact  the unit convenor within 7 days of the date of return of the assignment and provide a detailed assessment your script against the task criteria. Evidence from your assignment must be provided to support your judgements.

Please note: The outcome of a remark may be a higher/lower or unchanged grade. Grades are standards referenced and effort is NOT a criterion.

Withdrawing from this UG Unit

If you are considering withdrawing from this unit, please seek academic advice by writing to https://ask.mq.edu.au before doing so as this unit may be a co-requisite or prerequisite for units in the following semesters and may impact on your progression through the degree.

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Due
K-6 PDHPE Assessment Task 35% Week 6
K-6 HSIE Lesson Plans 35% Week 9
Designing a school excursion 30% Week 13

K-6 PDHPE Assessment Task

Due: Week 6
Weighting: 35%

Purpose: To develop a PDHPE assessment task based on outcomes from K-6 PDHPE syllabus.

Procedure:

Page 1: Lesson Plan

  • Design an assessment task (of your own design) that addresses at least TWO K-6 PDHPE Outcomes.

Pages 2-4: Justification Statement

  • Identify the literacy (health, physical or BOTH) you are targeting to influence;
  • Describe how the body of literature pertaining to the PDHPE syllabus and health/physical literacy influenced your assessment task;
  • Discuss the means in which you would formatively prepare students to undertake this assessment task;
  • Based on your own review of appropriate scholarly literature, what evidence-based pedagogy(s) could/are being employed during the learning preceding the assessment task? Why are these the most appropriate for the content being assessed in your task?
  • Provide a detailed reference list in APA 6th formatting style.

This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Identify the five essential skills that students develop from PDHPE.
  • Promote students’ positive healthy decision making and the engagement of all students in an active lifestyle
  • Participate in programs that develop the pre-service teacher’s skills in human movement and sports skills, gymnastics, aquatics and interpersonal skills.
  • Plan and assess health focused experiences in the areas of personal development, health and physical activity.

K-6 HSIE Lesson Plans

Due: Week 9
Weighting: 35%

Purpose: To develop a series (no more than two) HSIE lessons based on outcomes (no less than two) from K-6 History or Geography syllabus and the NSW Quality Teaching Framework (QTF).

Procedure:

Page 1 & 2: Lesson plans

  • Design two lesson plans (unique and of your own design) that addresses at least TWO K-6 History or Geography Outcomes.

Pages 3-5: Justification Statement

  • Identify your target group by Year or Stage;
  • Justify the aspects of the QTF that are exemplified in your lesson plans (1 page max);
  • Based on your own review of appropriate scholarly literature, how do your lessons capture learning across the different domains of learning and the NSW K-6 History or Geography Outcomes identified?

Provide a detailed reference list in APA 6th formatting style.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Articulate theoretical and ecological understandings of citizenship, social justice and democracy across contextual layers and diverse groups
  • Explain the multiple historical and cultural perspectives and viewpoints – focussing on childhood, environments, societies and histories in global contexts and in Australia.
  • Examine learning of ‘shared heritage’ with students, families and community – identifying strategies for extending learning beyond the classroom.

Designing a school excursion

Due: Week 13
Weighting: 30%

Purpose: Propose an excursion opportunity for primary school aged children that addresses at least two HSIE and two PDHPE syllabus outcomes.

Procedure:

Page 1: Letter to Principal

  • Identify your target group by Year or Stage for whom the excursion will occur
  • List the syllabus outcomes being explored
  • Justify the need for an excursion to engage student in the syllabus outcomes being explored.
  • Referring to the NSW Department of Education Excursion Policy Implementation Procedures, write a letter to a school principal arguing the educational value and inclusivity aspects of the excursion you are proposing.
    • Important note: Principals determining the number of teachers required for an excursion should be guided by Department statements on class sizes. Fewer students per teacher will be necessary for some excursions such as bushwalking. Particular aquatic and outdoor recreation activities have specific teacher/instructor to student ratios. These are identified in the Guidelines for Specific Activities section of Sport and Physical Activity in Schools, Safe Conduct Guidelines

Page 2: Letter to Parents

Page 4: Briefing for students prior to the excursion

  • Prepare a script to brief on the school's expectations of their behaviour. Be ensure to include
    • their right to be safe and protected, about protective strategies and of avenues for support should concerns arise
    • the importance of advising staff or others (eg volunteers, billet parents) if they are unwell or if they believe one of their fellow students is unwell.
    • the extent to which a culture different to their own is being explored and the need for appropriate communication in cross-cultural contexts
    • appropriate behaviour around animals (if appropriate)

 

Page 5-7: Complete a risk management assessment for the excursion

  • Steps in developing the excursion risk management plan
    • List the activities of the excursion
      • List the activities of the excursion, that is, break the whole excursion into its parts e.g. getting to and from the venue, being at the venue, each of the major activities at the venue, having meals, staying at the accommodation etc.
    • Identify the hazards
      • Determine the hazards associated with the activities. Consider hazards associated with travel, the venue, activities at the venue, equipment used in the activities, the environment, people (e.g. behaviour and medical conditions), and accommodation.
    • Assess the level of risk
      • Using the risk assessment matrix, determine the seriousness of the risks associated with the hazards by considering both the likelihood and severity of risks. This gives you a risk ranking from 1 being the most serious to 6 being the least serious.
    • Eliminate or control the risks
      • Consider the most suitable control strategies for each of the identified hazards using the hierarchy of controls.
    • Document plan
      • Document the excursion risk management plan.
    • Communicate the plan
      • Communicate the plan to excursion supervisors. Provide relevant information to participants and their families.
    • Monitor and review
      • Monitor the effectiveness of controls and change if necessary. Review the risk assessment if an incident or a significant change occurs.

This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Articulate theoretical and ecological understandings of citizenship, social justice and democracy across contextual layers and diverse groups
  • Plan and assess learning experiences focusing on historical content, skills, values and attitudes in an integrated manner including understanding of strategies for differentiating teaching to meet the diverse learning needs of students
  • Examine learning of ‘shared heritage’ with students, families and community – identifying strategies for extending learning beyond the classroom.
  • Identify the five essential skills that students develop from PDHPE.
  • Plan and assess health focused experiences in the areas of personal development, health and physical activity.

Delivery and Resources

This subject requires students to be physically active. For PE workshops, students are required to wear sunscreen and athletic attire (i.e. Polo shirt, athletic shorts/pants, and athletic footwear) for practical lessons and swimwear and towels for practical lessons conducted in the pool. Students who do not present at the beginning of workshops appropriately attired will not be eligible to participate and will be marked as absent for the respective workshop. For Creative Arts (TA), students are required to wear appropriate clothes such as: A painting shirt for visual arts and loose fitting clothes for drama activities. Failure to attend all of the practical workshops may result in a Fail grade being awarded. Students unable to participate for medical reasons must present to the Subject Convenor with a Macquarie University sanctioned medical exemption prior to the commencement of the workshop. Refer to www.ask.mq.edu.au for more details.

Students enrolled in ECHE330 will also need regular access to a computer and the Internet. There are a number of university computers in C5C (Rooms 211, 213 and 217) as well as in C5A204 and 210 that can be accessed at specified times.

The iLearn web page for this unit can be found at iLearn.mq.edu.au

The ECHE330 iLearn facility provides students with access to:

  • Lecture PowerPoint presentations
  • A soft copy of the ECHE330 Unit Outline, assignment cover sheets and marking criteria
  • Selected policy documents

Please do NOT contact the Unit Convener regarding iLearn technical support.  Instead, contact the Macquarie University Library Student IT Help Desk (Phone: 9850 4357; Email: support@mq.edu.au)

Policies and Procedures

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central. Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Academic Honesty Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/academic_honesty/policy.html

Assessment Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/assessment/policy_2016.html

Grade Appeal Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/gradeappeal/policy.html

Complaint Management Procedure for Students and Members of the Public http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/complaint_management/procedure.html​

Disruption to Studies Policy http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/disruption_studies/policy.html The Disruption to Studies Policy is effective from March 3 2014 and replaces the Special Consideration Policy.

In addition, a number of other policies can be found in the Learning and Teaching Category of Policy Central.

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/support/student_conduct/

Results

Results shown in iLearn, or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent. For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au.

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Learning Skills

Learning Skills (mq.edu.au/learningskills) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to improve your marks and take control of your study.

Student Enquiry Service

For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at ask.mq.edu.au

Equity Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

IT Help

For help with University computer systems and technology, visit http://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/information_technology/help/

When using the University's IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use of IT Resources Policy. The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network including students.

Graduate Capabilities

Effective Communication

We want to develop in our students the ability to communicate and convey their views in forms effective with different audiences. We want our graduates to take with them the capability to read, listen, question, gather and evaluate information resources in a variety of formats, assess, write clearly, speak effectively, and to use visual communication and communication technologies as appropriate.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Examine learning of ‘shared heritage’ with students, families and community – identifying strategies for extending learning beyond the classroom.
  • Participate in programs that develop the pre-service teacher’s skills in human movement and sports skills, gymnastics, aquatics and interpersonal skills.

Assessment tasks

  • K-6 PDHPE Assessment Task
  • K-6 HSIE Lesson Plans
  • Designing a school excursion

Discipline Specific Knowledge and Skills

Our graduates will take with them the intellectual development, depth and breadth of knowledge, scholarly understanding, and specific subject content in their chosen fields to make them competent and confident in their subject or profession. They will be able to demonstrate, where relevant, professional technical competence and meet professional standards. They will be able to articulate the structure of knowledge of their discipline, be able to adapt discipline-specific knowledge to novel situations, and be able to contribute from their discipline to inter-disciplinary solutions to problems.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Articulate theoretical and ecological understandings of citizenship, social justice and democracy across contextual layers and diverse groups
  • Explain the multiple historical and cultural perspectives and viewpoints – focussing on childhood, environments, societies and histories in global contexts and in Australia.
  • Plan and assess learning experiences focusing on historical content, skills, values and attitudes in an integrated manner including understanding of strategies for differentiating teaching to meet the diverse learning needs of students
  • Identify the five essential skills that students develop from PDHPE.
  • Promote students’ positive healthy decision making and the engagement of all students in an active lifestyle
  • Participate in programs that develop the pre-service teacher’s skills in human movement and sports skills, gymnastics, aquatics and interpersonal skills.
  • Plan and assess health focused experiences in the areas of personal development, health and physical activity.

Assessment tasks

  • K-6 PDHPE Assessment Task
  • K-6 HSIE Lesson Plans
  • Designing a school excursion

Critical, Analytical and Integrative Thinking

We want our graduates to be capable of reasoning, questioning and analysing, and to integrate and synthesise learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments; to be able to critique constraints, assumptions and limitations; to be able to think independently and systemically in relation to scholarly activity, in the workplace, and in the world. We want them to have a level of scientific and information technology literacy.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Articulate theoretical and ecological understandings of citizenship, social justice and democracy across contextual layers and diverse groups
  • Promote students’ positive healthy decision making and the engagement of all students in an active lifestyle

Assessment tasks

  • K-6 PDHPE Assessment Task
  • K-6 HSIE Lesson Plans
  • Designing a school excursion

Creative and Innovative

Our graduates will also be capable of creative thinking and of creating knowledge. They will be imaginative and open to experience and capable of innovation at work and in the community. We want them to be engaged in applying their critical, creative thinking.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • Examine learning of ‘shared heritage’ with students, families and community – identifying strategies for extending learning beyond the classroom.

Assessment tasks

  • K-6 PDHPE Assessment Task
  • K-6 HSIE Lesson Plans
  • Designing a school excursion

Engaged and Ethical Local and Global citizens

As local citizens our graduates will be aware of indigenous perspectives and of the nation's historical context. They will be engaged with the challenges of contemporary society and with knowledge and ideas. We want our graduates to have respect for diversity, to be open-minded, sensitive to others and inclusive, and to be open to other cultures and perspectives: they should have a level of cultural literacy. Our graduates should be aware of disadvantage and social justice, and be willing to participate to help create a wiser and better society.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Articulate theoretical and ecological understandings of citizenship, social justice and democracy across contextual layers and diverse groups
  • Explain the multiple historical and cultural perspectives and viewpoints – focussing on childhood, environments, societies and histories in global contexts and in Australia.
  • Plan and assess learning experiences focusing on historical content, skills, values and attitudes in an integrated manner including understanding of strategies for differentiating teaching to meet the diverse learning needs of students
  • Examine learning of ‘shared heritage’ with students, families and community – identifying strategies for extending learning beyond the classroom.

Socially and Environmentally Active and Responsible

We want our graduates to be aware of and have respect for self and others; to be able to work with others as a leader and a team player; to have a sense of connectedness with others and country; and to have a sense of mutual obligation. Our graduates should be informed and active participants in moving society towards sustainability.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Articulate theoretical and ecological understandings of citizenship, social justice and democracy across contextual layers and diverse groups
  • Explain the multiple historical and cultural perspectives and viewpoints – focussing on childhood, environments, societies and histories in global contexts and in Australia.
  • Plan and assess learning experiences focusing on historical content, skills, values and attitudes in an integrated manner including understanding of strategies for differentiating teaching to meet the diverse learning needs of students
  • Examine learning of ‘shared heritage’ with students, families and community – identifying strategies for extending learning beyond the classroom.
  • Promote students’ positive healthy decision making and the engagement of all students in an active lifestyle

Assessment task

  • Designing a school excursion

Capable of Professional and Personal Judgement and Initiative

We want our graduates to have emotional intelligence and sound interpersonal skills and to demonstrate discernment and common sense in their professional and personal judgement. They will exercise initiative as needed. They will be capable of risk assessment, and be able to handle ambiguity and complexity, enabling them to be adaptable in diverse and changing environments.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Identify the five essential skills that students develop from PDHPE.
  • Plan and assess health focused experiences in the areas of personal development, health and physical activity.

Assessment tasks

  • K-6 PDHPE Assessment Task
  • K-6 HSIE Lesson Plans

Changes since First Published

Date Description
21/07/2017 Assessment 2 & 3 due dates changed to Weeks 9 and 13 respectively.