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MHIS207 – From Charlemagne to Game of Thrones: The Middle Ages Then and Now

2017 – S2 External

General Information

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Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff
Clare Monagle
Credit points Credit points
3
Prerequisites Prerequisites
12cp at 100 level or above or (3cp in HIST or MHIS or POL units)
Corequisites Corequisites
Co-badged status Co-badged status
Unit description Unit description
The ‘medieval’ is everywhere in our ‘modern’ age, both in culture and in our institutions. The University and the Parliament are medieval institutional inventions, for example. Our popular culture is imbued with myths bequeathed by the Middle Ages, from Robin Hood to Jedi Knights. And yet, the term ‘medieval’ is hurled as an insult to anyone thought to be backwards or ignorant. Following Tarantino, brutal punishment can be defined as getting medieval. This course will look at both the real Middle Ages, as a historical period, as well as its representations in our own culture. In particular, we will look at the political history of Latin Christendom, in order to understand the rise of kingdoms and the papacy during the Middle Ages. At the same time, students will encounter medievalism in our own time. We will match our discussion of the ‘real’ Middle Ages with awareness of the ‘fantasy’ Middle Ages in which our imaginations so often reside.

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at http://students.mq.edu.au/student_admin/enrolmentguide/academicdates/

Learning Outcomes

  1. MHIS207 serves as an introduction to 2 distinct, but overlapping, areas of content. We look at the Middle Ages in Europe (roughly 500-1500), as well as medievalism in contemporary popular culture (roughly 1900-present). By the end of the unit students will be expected to - Define the roles played by knights, the 'Lady', monarchs, and the clergy within the Middle Ages, and to identify how these roles developed over the course of the medieval period. - Identify the archetypal function played by each of the above in contemporary popular culture. - Explain the chronological arc of medieval history. They will be expected to define key characteristics of the early medieval world, particularly the rise of feudalism and monasticism. They will need also to be able to chart the developments into the more urbanised and governmentalised society that emerges after circa. 1000, explaining the rise of administrations, chivalry, and the university. - Critically consider the cultural work performed by the medieval in popular culture, identifying the ideological usage of both the term ‘medieval’ and medieval tropes in discourse. - Relate medievalist work and cultural product to larger historical moments.

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Hurdle Due
Weekly Tests - In-Class 30% Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 9, 10
3 minute Presentation 10% 5pm, November 3
Short Answer Take Home test. 30% Friday, 15th September, 5pm
Reflective Essay 30% Friday, 10th November, 5pm

Weekly Tests - In-Class

Due: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 9, 10
Weighting: 30%

Prior to weeks 2,3,4,5,6,9 and 10, students will be expected to watch a film, as well as to watch a pre-recorded lecture. External students will be expected to undertake a multiple-choice test that will test their comprehension of these sources. The test will be available on i-learn by Monday 9am ofeach week, and must be completed by Friday, 5pm of the same week.

The test questions will not be designed to test your interpretation or critical understanding of the films and lectures. Rather, I will be testing for basic comprehension and evidence that they have been watched.

The final mark for these tests will be averaged over the semester. I understand that due to illness, students may need to miss tests on occasions. With that in mind, I will exclude the two tests from the final average that receive the lowest marks. Should you miss up to two weeks, and receive  mark of zero, then those results will not be factored into your final results.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • MHIS207 serves as an introduction to 2 distinct, but overlapping, areas of content. We look at the Middle Ages in Europe (roughly 500-1500), as well as medievalism in contemporary popular culture (roughly 1900-present). By the end of the unit students will be expected to - Define the roles played by knights, the 'Lady', monarchs, and the clergy within the Middle Ages, and to identify how these roles developed over the course of the medieval period. - Identify the archetypal function played by each of the above in contemporary popular culture. - Explain the chronological arc of medieval history. They will be expected to define key characteristics of the early medieval world, particularly the rise of feudalism and monasticism. They will need also to be able to chart the developments into the more urbanised and governmentalised society that emerges after circa. 1000, explaining the rise of administrations, chivalry, and the university. - Critically consider the cultural work performed by the medieval in popular culture, identifying the ideological usage of both the term ‘medieval’ and medieval tropes in discourse. - Relate medievalist work and cultural product to larger historical moments.

3 minute Presentation

Due: 5pm, November 3
Weighting: 10%

Each student should present a biography of a medieval figure whose fame extends into the Middle Ages. This biography should not just cover their actual life, but their afterlives in contemporary culture. Some possible figures might be, Robin Hood, Joan of Arc, Eleanor of Aquitaine, King John, Richard the Lionheart, Saladin, Charlemagne, Abelard, Heloise, Thomas Aquinas, William the Conqueror, William Wallace Hildegard of Bingen, Simon de Montfort, Marco Polo, El Cid, King Arthur, Lancelot, Guinevere, Morgan Le Fay, Merlin, St. Patrick, Francis of Assisi. 

External students should record their presentation and email it to me, using a file sharing service if the file is too large to email.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • MHIS207 serves as an introduction to 2 distinct, but overlapping, areas of content. We look at the Middle Ages in Europe (roughly 500-1500), as well as medievalism in contemporary popular culture (roughly 1900-present). By the end of the unit students will be expected to - Define the roles played by knights, the 'Lady', monarchs, and the clergy within the Middle Ages, and to identify how these roles developed over the course of the medieval period. - Identify the archetypal function played by each of the above in contemporary popular culture. - Explain the chronological arc of medieval history. They will be expected to define key characteristics of the early medieval world, particularly the rise of feudalism and monasticism. They will need also to be able to chart the developments into the more urbanised and governmentalised society that emerges after circa. 1000, explaining the rise of administrations, chivalry, and the university. - Critically consider the cultural work performed by the medieval in popular culture, identifying the ideological usage of both the term ‘medieval’ and medieval tropes in discourse. - Relate medievalist work and cultural product to larger historical moments.

Short Answer Take Home test.

Due: Friday, 15th September, 5pm
Weighting: 30%

This assessment task is designed to test your understanding of key concepts in the course. The test questions will be released on Monday, September 11, by 9am. The test will be due on the Friday of that week, at 5pm.

Students will be given 10 questions, and asked to answer 5, with answers of approximately 250 words each. 


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • MHIS207 serves as an introduction to 2 distinct, but overlapping, areas of content. We look at the Middle Ages in Europe (roughly 500-1500), as well as medievalism in contemporary popular culture (roughly 1900-present). By the end of the unit students will be expected to - Define the roles played by knights, the 'Lady', monarchs, and the clergy within the Middle Ages, and to identify how these roles developed over the course of the medieval period. - Identify the archetypal function played by each of the above in contemporary popular culture. - Explain the chronological arc of medieval history. They will be expected to define key characteristics of the early medieval world, particularly the rise of feudalism and monasticism. They will need also to be able to chart the developments into the more urbanised and governmentalised society that emerges after circa. 1000, explaining the rise of administrations, chivalry, and the university. - Critically consider the cultural work performed by the medieval in popular culture, identifying the ideological usage of both the term ‘medieval’ and medieval tropes in discourse. - Relate medievalist work and cultural product to larger historical moments.

Reflective Essay

Due: Friday, 10th November, 5pm
Weighting: 30%

This 1500 word essay will test the student's capacity to integrate a number of sources studied in the unit, in order to answer a general question pertaining the issues of the course. In so doing, they will be expected to utilise a number of secondary sources from the class readings. 

The essay question will be released by 5pm on Friday, 3rd November, and will be due at that time in the following week. It should be footnoted, in the Chicago style.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • MHIS207 serves as an introduction to 2 distinct, but overlapping, areas of content. We look at the Middle Ages in Europe (roughly 500-1500), as well as medievalism in contemporary popular culture (roughly 1900-present). By the end of the unit students will be expected to - Define the roles played by knights, the 'Lady', monarchs, and the clergy within the Middle Ages, and to identify how these roles developed over the course of the medieval period. - Identify the archetypal function played by each of the above in contemporary popular culture. - Explain the chronological arc of medieval history. They will be expected to define key characteristics of the early medieval world, particularly the rise of feudalism and monasticism. They will need also to be able to chart the developments into the more urbanised and governmentalised society that emerges after circa. 1000, explaining the rise of administrations, chivalry, and the university. - Critically consider the cultural work performed by the medieval in popular culture, identifying the ideological usage of both the term ‘medieval’ and medieval tropes in discourse. - Relate medievalist work and cultural product to larger historical moments.

Delivery and Resources

Resources for pre-reading and pre-viewing will be made available through the Moodle site on ilearn, as well as in the library reserves section.

Policies and Procedures

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central. Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Academic Honesty Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/academic_honesty/policy.html

Assessment Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/assessment/policy_2016.html

Grade Appeal Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/gradeappeal/policy.html

Complaint Management Procedure for Students and Members of the Public http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/complaint_management/procedure.html​

Disruption to Studies Policy (in effect until Dec 4th, 2017): http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/disruption_studies/policy.html

Special Consideration Policy (in effect from Dec 4th, 2017): https://staff.mq.edu.au/work/strategy-planning-and-governance/university-policies-and-procedures/policies/special-consideration

In addition, a number of other policies can be found in the Learning and Teaching Category of Policy Central.

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/support/student_conduct/

Results

Results shown in iLearn, or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent. For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au.

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Learning Skills

Learning Skills (mq.edu.au/learningskills) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to improve your marks and take control of your study.

Student Enquiry Service

For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at ask.mq.edu.au

Equity Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

IT Help

For help with University computer systems and technology, visit http://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/information_technology/help/

When using the University's IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use of IT Resources Policy. The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network including students.

Graduate Capabilities

Problem Solving and Research Capability

Our graduates should be capable of researching; of analysing, and interpreting and assessing data and information in various forms; of drawing connections across fields of knowledge; and they should be able to relate their knowledge to complex situations at work or in the world, in order to diagnose and solve problems. We want them to have the confidence to take the initiative in doing so, within an awareness of their own limitations.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • MHIS207 serves as an introduction to 2 distinct, but overlapping, areas of content. We look at the Middle Ages in Europe (roughly 500-1500), as well as medievalism in contemporary popular culture (roughly 1900-present). By the end of the unit students will be expected to - Define the roles played by knights, the 'Lady', monarchs, and the clergy within the Middle Ages, and to identify how these roles developed over the course of the medieval period. - Identify the archetypal function played by each of the above in contemporary popular culture. - Explain the chronological arc of medieval history. They will be expected to define key characteristics of the early medieval world, particularly the rise of feudalism and monasticism. They will need also to be able to chart the developments into the more urbanised and governmentalised society that emerges after circa. 1000, explaining the rise of administrations, chivalry, and the university. - Critically consider the cultural work performed by the medieval in popular culture, identifying the ideological usage of both the term ‘medieval’ and medieval tropes in discourse. - Relate medievalist work and cultural product to larger historical moments.

Assessment tasks

  • Weekly Tests - In-Class
  • 3 minute Presentation
  • Short Answer Take Home test.
  • Reflective Essay

Effective Communication

We want to develop in our students the ability to communicate and convey their views in forms effective with different audiences. We want our graduates to take with them the capability to read, listen, question, gather and evaluate information resources in a variety of formats, assess, write clearly, speak effectively, and to use visual communication and communication technologies as appropriate.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • MHIS207 serves as an introduction to 2 distinct, but overlapping, areas of content. We look at the Middle Ages in Europe (roughly 500-1500), as well as medievalism in contemporary popular culture (roughly 1900-present). By the end of the unit students will be expected to - Define the roles played by knights, the 'Lady', monarchs, and the clergy within the Middle Ages, and to identify how these roles developed over the course of the medieval period. - Identify the archetypal function played by each of the above in contemporary popular culture. - Explain the chronological arc of medieval history. They will be expected to define key characteristics of the early medieval world, particularly the rise of feudalism and monasticism. They will need also to be able to chart the developments into the more urbanised and governmentalised society that emerges after circa. 1000, explaining the rise of administrations, chivalry, and the university. - Critically consider the cultural work performed by the medieval in popular culture, identifying the ideological usage of both the term ‘medieval’ and medieval tropes in discourse. - Relate medievalist work and cultural product to larger historical moments.

Assessment tasks

  • Weekly Tests - In-Class
  • 3 minute Presentation
  • Short Answer Take Home test.
  • Reflective Essay

Discipline Specific Knowledge and Skills

Our graduates will take with them the intellectual development, depth and breadth of knowledge, scholarly understanding, and specific subject content in their chosen fields to make them competent and confident in their subject or profession. They will be able to demonstrate, where relevant, professional technical competence and meet professional standards. They will be able to articulate the structure of knowledge of their discipline, be able to adapt discipline-specific knowledge to novel situations, and be able to contribute from their discipline to inter-disciplinary solutions to problems.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • MHIS207 serves as an introduction to 2 distinct, but overlapping, areas of content. We look at the Middle Ages in Europe (roughly 500-1500), as well as medievalism in contemporary popular culture (roughly 1900-present). By the end of the unit students will be expected to - Define the roles played by knights, the 'Lady', monarchs, and the clergy within the Middle Ages, and to identify how these roles developed over the course of the medieval period. - Identify the archetypal function played by each of the above in contemporary popular culture. - Explain the chronological arc of medieval history. They will be expected to define key characteristics of the early medieval world, particularly the rise of feudalism and monasticism. They will need also to be able to chart the developments into the more urbanised and governmentalised society that emerges after circa. 1000, explaining the rise of administrations, chivalry, and the university. - Critically consider the cultural work performed by the medieval in popular culture, identifying the ideological usage of both the term ‘medieval’ and medieval tropes in discourse. - Relate medievalist work and cultural product to larger historical moments.

Assessment tasks

  • Weekly Tests - In-Class
  • 3 minute Presentation
  • Short Answer Take Home test.
  • Reflective Essay

Critical, Analytical and Integrative Thinking

We want our graduates to be capable of reasoning, questioning and analysing, and to integrate and synthesise learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments; to be able to critique constraints, assumptions and limitations; to be able to think independently and systemically in relation to scholarly activity, in the workplace, and in the world. We want them to have a level of scientific and information technology literacy.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • MHIS207 serves as an introduction to 2 distinct, but overlapping, areas of content. We look at the Middle Ages in Europe (roughly 500-1500), as well as medievalism in contemporary popular culture (roughly 1900-present). By the end of the unit students will be expected to - Define the roles played by knights, the 'Lady', monarchs, and the clergy within the Middle Ages, and to identify how these roles developed over the course of the medieval period. - Identify the archetypal function played by each of the above in contemporary popular culture. - Explain the chronological arc of medieval history. They will be expected to define key characteristics of the early medieval world, particularly the rise of feudalism and monasticism. They will need also to be able to chart the developments into the more urbanised and governmentalised society that emerges after circa. 1000, explaining the rise of administrations, chivalry, and the university. - Critically consider the cultural work performed by the medieval in popular culture, identifying the ideological usage of both the term ‘medieval’ and medieval tropes in discourse. - Relate medievalist work and cultural product to larger historical moments.

Assessment tasks

  • Weekly Tests - In-Class
  • 3 minute Presentation
  • Short Answer Take Home test.
  • Reflective Essay

Creative and Innovative

Our graduates will also be capable of creative thinking and of creating knowledge. They will be imaginative and open to experience and capable of innovation at work and in the community. We want them to be engaged in applying their critical, creative thinking.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • MHIS207 serves as an introduction to 2 distinct, but overlapping, areas of content. We look at the Middle Ages in Europe (roughly 500-1500), as well as medievalism in contemporary popular culture (roughly 1900-present). By the end of the unit students will be expected to - Define the roles played by knights, the 'Lady', monarchs, and the clergy within the Middle Ages, and to identify how these roles developed over the course of the medieval period. - Identify the archetypal function played by each of the above in contemporary popular culture. - Explain the chronological arc of medieval history. They will be expected to define key characteristics of the early medieval world, particularly the rise of feudalism and monasticism. They will need also to be able to chart the developments into the more urbanised and governmentalised society that emerges after circa. 1000, explaining the rise of administrations, chivalry, and the university. - Critically consider the cultural work performed by the medieval in popular culture, identifying the ideological usage of both the term ‘medieval’ and medieval tropes in discourse. - Relate medievalist work and cultural product to larger historical moments.

Assessment tasks

  • Weekly Tests - In-Class
  • 3 minute Presentation
  • Short Answer Take Home test.
  • Reflective Essay