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POL 821 – Case Studies in Politics and Policy

2017 – S2 External

General Information

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Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit coordinator
Nicholas Bromfield
Contact via Email
Hearing Hub, South Wing, Level 2
By appointment
Credit points Credit points
4
Prerequisites Prerequisites
Admission to MPPP or MPASR or GradDipPASR or GradCertPP or GradDipPP or MIntLawGovPP
Corequisites Corequisites
Co-badged status Co-badged status
Unit description Unit description
This unit provides the opportunity to explore a topical and significant policy area in detail, looking at both the historical development of the policy and contemporary policy-making. The area to be examined will vary, reflecting current debates and interest in the public arena.

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at https://students.mq.edu.au/important-dates

Learning Outcomes

  1. Identify and comprehend the history of Australia's migration policy, and how it compares to other polities.
  2. Identify and comprehend theories and typologies of migration policy, and how they might interact with public policy theory and comparative methods.
  3. Identify and comprehend various aspects of Australia's migration policy and how that compares with other polities and/or regions, including, for example, policy regarding asylum, high and low skilled workers, citizenship, integration and multiculturalism, securitization, and irregular migrants.
  4. Effectively research and present written work, including literature reviews and essays.
  5. Effectively communicate and participate in class discussions and activities.

General Assessment Information

General Assessment Information

The two longer paper components of assessment are linked and are designed to test your research, critical, and analytical skills. They build upon the seminars that you have conducted throughout the semester, but also require independent research and initiative. They will further require substantial preparation, reading, and research.

Time will be set aside in week 9 classes for essay questions and preparation. You should have conducted substantial preparation by this point in time so your approach can be discussed and feedback can be sought. 

Regarding the participation component, research indicates that learning in university settings is a function of attendance and participation.  Furthermore, students who are actively engaged through discussion, demonstration, and teaching retain more than passive learners in this endeavour. 

A note on essay word limits: the reference list and title page will be excluded from the word count. Everything else, including sub-headings, references, quotes, tables/data, footnotes etc., will be included in the final count. Please do not write less or more than the set word ranges – penalties will be applied for those who do not follow these instructions.

Lateness and late penalties: If an assignment is submitted late, 5% of the available mark will be deducted for each day (including weekends) the paper is late. For example, if a paper is worth 20 marks, 1 mark will be deducted from the grade for each day that it is late (i.e. a student given 15/20 who submitted 4 days late will lose 4 marks = 11/20).

Essay Questions

Choose one of the following essay questions: 

  1. Critically discuss and analyse this statement: the securitization of migration policy is a necessary component of a nation-state's management of threats. Compare the securitization of migration policy in Australia with at least one other country. 

  2. Critically discuss and analyse this statement: in order to be internationally competitive, nation-states now require the flexibility that temporary migration offers. Compare the development of Australia's temporary migration policy with at least one other country.

  3. Critically discuss and analyse this statement: the outcomes that migrants experience in countries with high degrees of multiculturalism demonstrates the effectiveness of this suite of policies. Compare Australian multiculturalism policy and migrant outcomes with at least one other country.

  4. Design your own research question. Importantly, it must be in the form of  a question. General statements and topic areas will not be accepted. The research question should address a puzzle, or gap, in the literature you have identified. This might include applying a theory to a case study comparison that hasn’t been conducted yet, the study of a new development, or even theory testing or theory development. Your selection of countries to compare will play an important role here. If you choose this option, you are required to (i) compare Australian migration policy with at least one other country; and (ii) to seek approval from Dr Bromfield for your research question by 5pm, September 1st. 

You may change your essay question after the first assignment if you wish, but is recommended that you choose carefully, as switching will result in you losing any specific feedback given regarding the first chosen question.

Assessment Criteria

The following criteria will inform the grading of your assessments. 

Literature Review and Research Question assessment criteria:

  1. Quality of research that thoroughly surveys the literature and meets the requirements regarding the 20 peer-reviewed and scholarly sources, 12 of which must be found independently.

  2. Quality and appropriateness of the literature review of the theory, concepts, and typologies relevant to your research question.

  3. Quality and appropriateness of the literature review of the case study comparison relevant to your research question.

  4. Quality and appropriateness of the research question rationale.

  5. Appropriate structure, language, referencing using an in-text referencing style (no footnotes), and meeting of the word limit.

Major Essay assessment criteria:

  1. Quality of research that thoroughly employs the relevant literature and meets the requirements regarding the 20 peer-reviewed and scholarly sources, 12 of which must be found independently.

  2. Quality and appropriateness of the employment of theory, concepts, and typologies, relevant to your research question.

  3. Quality and appropriateness of the case study comparison.

  4. Quality and appropriateness of the overall argument.  Relevant factors here will include cohesion, persuasiveness, and skilfull employment of research.

  5. Appropriate structure, language, referencing using an in-text referencing style (no footnotes), and meeting of the word limit.

Participation

Grade

Assessment Criteria

Absent/Non-Satisfactory

  • Absent without valid, documented reason. 
  • Is dismissive/rude/abusive towards other students. 
  • Dominates/interrupts discussion and group exercises even after multiple requests to allow others to participate. 

Pass

  • Present, not disruptive. 
  • Attempts to respond when called upon but minimal contribution to class learning.
  • Demonstrates little preparation for class or evidence of analysis of readings and issues. 
  • Demonstrates very infrequent involvement in discussion and group exercises. 

Credit

  • Demonstrates adequate preparation: knows the fundamentals of the case or readings, with some evidence of trying to interpret or analyse them.
  • Offers straightforward information (e.g., straight from the case or reading), without, or very infrequent, elaboration (perhaps once a class).
  • Demonstrates sporadic involvement in discussion and group exercises.

Distinction

  • Demonstrates good preparation: knows case or reading facts well, has thought through implications of them.
  • Offers interpretations and analysis of case material (more than just facts) to class.
  • Contributes well to discussion in an ongoing way: responds to other students' points, thinks through own points, questions others in a constructive way, offers and supports suggestions that may be counter to the majority opinion.
  • Demonstrates consistent ongoing involvement in discussion and group exercises, whilst being respectful of fellow students’ right to participate. 

High Distinction

  • Demonstrates excellent preparation: has analysed case exceptionally well, relating it to readings and other material (e.g., lectures, readings from other weeks, additional relevant research or knowledge etc.).
  • Offers analysis, synthesis, evaluation of case material and critical thought, e.g., puts together pieces of the discussion to develop new approaches that take the class further.
  • Contributes in a very significant way to ongoing discussion: keeps analysis focused, responds very thoughtfully to other students' comments, contributes to the cooperative argument-building, suggests alternative or critical ways of approaching material and helps class analyse which approaches are appropriate, etc.
  • Demonstrates ongoing very active involvement in discussion and group exercises, whilst being respectful of fellow students’ right to participate.

Adapted from: Martha L. Maznevski (1996) Grading Class Participation available Online: 

http://trc.virginia.edu/Publications/Teaching_Concerns/Spring_1996/TC_Spring_1996_Maznevski.htm

 

 

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Hurdle Due
Literature review & rationale 30% Yes Sept 15, 11.59pm AEST
Major essay 50% Yes Nov 10, 11.59pm AEST
Participation 20% Yes Ongoing

Literature review & rationale

Due: Sept 15, 11.59pm AEST
Weighting: 30%
This is a hurdle assessment task (see assessment policy for more information on hurdle assessment tasks)

This first assessment is a preparatory assignment for the major essay. It requires three major components:  

  1. A review of the literature on the theory/conceptual approach/typologies to your research question (approx. 500 words).

  2. A review of the scholarly and secondary literature on your research question’s countries of comparison (approx. 500 words).

  3. A brief statement of your approach to the research question and setting out of its rationale (approx. 500 words).

This assignment has one minor component:

  1. A very brief introduction is required, stating the general topic to be examined and a short roadmap of the paper structure (approx. 100 words). Section 3 above detailing your approach to the research question and rationale should serve as your conclusion. 

Word limit: 1500-2000 words. N.B. The reference list and title page will be excluded from the word count. Everything else, including sub-headings, references, quotes, tables/data, footnotes etc., will be included in the final count. Please do not write less or more than the set word ranges – penalties will be applied for those who do not follow these instructions.

N.B. This assignment is not a plan for your essay. Essays that fail to do the above and waste time setting out the precise detail of their essays or rehearsing their arguments for the essay, will grade poorly, or even fail.

A literature review requires a comprehensive survey on what has been written on a topic. You should set out what has been written on your research question, including what the major debates, controversies, schools of thought, and data that exist are. Further, you are required to explain the rationale behind your approach to the research question in the final section. What theory/typology will you adopt and why? What evidence will you need and why? Your selection of countries to compare will play an important role here and needs to be explained too.

Since this is a review of the literature, you are required to find and cite a minimum of 20 peer-reviewed and scholarly sources. At least 12 sources must be found independently, and cannot be set readings. Reports and research from governments, international organisations, NGOs, think tanks etc, or media reports from reputable sources will in all likelihood be required and may be appropriately included and cited too (especially in section 2 on the case study), but will not count towards the 20 peer-reviewed and scholarly sources.

For an example of a literature review, see: Donato, K. M., Gabaccia, D., Holdaway, J., Manalansan, M. and Pessar, P. R. (2006), ‘A Glass Half Full? Gender in Migration Studies’. International Migration Review, 40: 3–26. doi:10.1111/j.1747-7379.2006.00001.x. 


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Identify and comprehend the history of Australia's migration policy, and how it compares to other polities.
  • Identify and comprehend theories and typologies of migration policy, and how they might interact with public policy theory and comparative methods.
  • Identify and comprehend various aspects of Australia's migration policy and how that compares with other polities and/or regions, including, for example, policy regarding asylum, high and low skilled workers, citizenship, integration and multiculturalism, securitization, and irregular migrants.
  • Effectively research and present written work, including literature reviews and essays.

Major essay

Due: Nov 10, 11.59pm AEST
Weighting: 50%
This is a hurdle assessment task (see assessment policy for more information on hurdle assessment tasks)

The major essay is the culmination of the preparatory work conducted in the first assessment. You should have acted on the feedback and advice given in your previous assessment and discussions and further engaged with research on your topic.

The essay has one major component:

  1. Answer your essay question in an essay format. 

This assignment has three minor components:

  1. State your thesis, and clearly signal your argument, in your introduction (approx. 250 words).

  2. Provide a brief literature review and justification of your focus immediately after the introduction (approx. 300 words). 

  3. Use the remainder of your essay to skilfully and persuasively mount your argument, employing the theories/concepts/typologies that you have identified. 

Word limit: 2500-3000 words. N.B. The reference list and title page will be excluded from the word count. Everything else, including sub-headings, references, quotes, tables/data, footnotes etc., will be included in the final count. Please do not write less or more than the set word ranges – penalties will be applied for those who do not follow these instructions.

Like the first assessment, you are required to find and cite at least 20 peer-reviewed and scholarly sources, 12 of which must be found independently, and cannot be from the set readings. Further secondary literature from reputable government, international organisation, NGO, media, etc. sources will also be required, but will not count towards the 20 peer-reviewed materials.

Further guidance on the structure of the assessments will be provided well-beforehand in essay writing workshop and will be hosted on iLearn. 


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Identify and comprehend the history of Australia's migration policy, and how it compares to other polities.
  • Identify and comprehend theories and typologies of migration policy, and how they might interact with public policy theory and comparative methods.
  • Identify and comprehend various aspects of Australia's migration policy and how that compares with other polities and/or regions, including, for example, policy regarding asylum, high and low skilled workers, citizenship, integration and multiculturalism, securitization, and irregular migrants.
  • Effectively research and present written work, including literature reviews and essays.

Participation

Due: Ongoing
Weighting: 20%
This is a hurdle assessment task (see assessment policy for more information on hurdle assessment tasks)

Attendance and participation is a requirement of this unit. This assessment has two major components: 

  1. Attendance in class. You are required to attend at two internal classes, Sunday 17 September and Sunday 5 November, 9.30am-1.30pm in W5C 221. This is a pass/fail assessment and is worth 10%. 
  2. Participation in class. You are required to come to class prepared and to participate genuinely in class discussions and activities. This is a gradable assessment and is worth 10%

This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Identify and comprehend the history of Australia's migration policy, and how it compares to other polities.
  • Identify and comprehend theories and typologies of migration policy, and how they might interact with public policy theory and comparative methods.
  • Identify and comprehend various aspects of Australia's migration policy and how that compares with other polities and/or regions, including, for example, policy regarding asylum, high and low skilled workers, citizenship, integration and multiculturalism, securitization, and irregular migrants.
  • Effectively communicate and participate in class discussions and activities.

Delivery and Resources

Classes run internally weekly on Mondays from 6pm-9pm. The lectures will be recorded and can be listened to on the Echo360 app available on iLearn. Discussion questions and activities that run internally will be included in the lecture slides and external students are encouraged to reflect upon them. Please contact me ASAP via email if there are problems with the lecture recording so I can address them.

Students undertaking this course externally require internet access and a suitable device to access course content. Lecture slides will be hosted on iLearn before each class for those students who wish to utilise the slides for note taking.

No specific technology is required for the internal classes, though a laptop/tablet/smartphone with a net connection or wifi capability will be useful for internal class activities. 

Weekly readings are listed on iLearn and are hosted by the library. Search for POL821 on the library homepage. 

Unit Schedule

POL821: Case Studies in Politics and Policy

Dr Nicholas Bromfield

2017

 

Week 1 – Introduction to Australian migration policy in comparative perspective

  • Hugo, Graeme. "Change and continuity in Australian international migration policy." International Migration Review 48.3 (2014): 868-890.

 

Week 2 – Recapping theories of public policy and the comparative method

  • Higley, John, John P. Nieuwenhuysen, and Stine Neerup, ‘Introduction: immigration in harder times’ in Higley, John, John P. Nieuwenhuysen, and Stine Neerup, eds. Immigration and the financial crisis: The United States and Australia compared. Edward Elgar Publishing, 2011.
  • Bloemraad, I. (2013) “Comparative methodologies in the study of migration”, Chapter 46 in Routledge International Handbook of Migration Studies, Routledge, pp553-563.
  • Paul Cairney And Tanya Heikkila (2014) ‘A Comparison of Theories of the Policy Process’ in Theories of the Policy Process, edited by Paul A. Sabatier and Christopher M Weible, Westview Press.

 

Week 3 – Migration policy and theory: some major perspectives

  • Castles, Stephen, Hein De Haas, and Mark J. Miller. ‘Theories of migration (chapter 2)’ in The age of migration: international population movements in the modern world 5th edtion. Basingstoke [England]: Palgrave Macmillan, 2014. pp.25-54.
  • Freeman, G. (2006). "National Models, Policy Types and the Politics of Immigration in Liberal Democracies." West European Politics: 227-247.

 

Week 4 – The politics of immigration policy

  • McAllister, Ian (2016): ‘National identity and attitudes towards immigration in Australia’, National Identities, online first: DOI: 10.1080/14608944.2016.1206069.
  • Van Spanje, Joost. "Contagious parties: Anti-immigration parties and their impact on other parties’ immigration stances in contemporary Western Europe." Party Politics 16.5 (2010): 563-586.

 

Week 5 – High skilled economic immigration in Australia compared

  • Khoo, Siew‐Ean. "Attracting and retaining globally mobile skilled migrants: policy challenges based on Australian research." International Migration 52.2 (2014): 20-30.
  • Cerna, L. (2014) "Attracting High‐Skilled Immigrants: Policies in Comparative Perspective." International Migration 52.3: 69-84.

Week 6 – Temporary economic immigration in Australia compared

  • Walsh, James. "From nations of immigrants to states of transience: Temporary migration in Canada and Australia." International Sociology 29.6 (2014): 584-606.
  • Ruhs, M. and P. Martin 2008, 'Numbers v Rights: Trade-Offs and Guest Worker Programs'. International Migration Review, vol. 42, no. 1, pp. 249-265.

Week 7 – The securitization of migration: the Bali process and Frontex compared

  • Curley, Melissa, and Kahlia Vandyk. "The securitisation of migrant smuggling in Australia and its consequences for the Bali Process." Australian Journal of International Affairs 71.1 (2017): 42-62.
  • Karamanidou, Lena. "The Securitisation of European Migration Policies: Perceptions of Threat and Management of Risk." The Securitisation of Migration in the EU. Palgrave Macmillan UK, 2015. 37-61.

 

Week 8 – No lecture: public holiday

 

Week 9 - Essay writing workshop

  • Gerring, John (2012) ‘Chapter 3 – Arguments’ in Social Science Methodology: A Unified Framework, Cambridge University Press.

 

Week 10 – Importing and exporting Australian asylum policy: policy transfer and diffusion

  • Ghezelbash, Daniel: 'Lessons in Exclusion: Interdiction and Extraterritorial Processing of Asylum Seekers in the United States and Australia' (2015), in Exploring the Boundaries of Refugee Law, Brill, pp. 90-117, DOI: 10.1163/9789004265585_006.
  • Nethery, Amy, and Carly Gordyn. "Australia–Indonesia cooperation on asylum-seekers: a case of ‘incentivised policy transfer’." Australian Journal of International Affairs 68.2 (2014): 177-193.

 

Week 11 – Complaining about what, precisely?: irregular migration in Australia compared

  • Koser, K., and M. McAuliffe. "Establishing an Evidence-Base for Future Policy Development on Irregular Migration to Australia" Australian Department of Immigration and Citizenship (2013).
  • International Organization for Migration (2014). ‘The evidence behind the picture: Irregular migration in ACP countries and the global South’, Background Note ACPOBS/2014/BN12, online: http://publications.iom.int/system/files/pdf/the_evidence_en.pdf

 

Week 12 – What happens when immigrants get here?: migrant outcomes and citizenship in Australia compared

  • Department of Immigration and Border Protection (2016) Continuous Survey of Australia’s Migrants, Cohort 2 Report - Change in Outcomes 2015, Commonwealth of Australia, Canberra, ACT.
  • Janoski, T. 2010, The Ironies of Citizenship: Naturalisation and Integration in Industrialised Countries, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, chapter 1 – ‘Introduction: the politics of granting citizenship’: 1-24.
  • Koopmans, R. (2010). "Trade-Offs between Equality and Difference: Immigrant Integration, Multiculturalism and the Welfare State in Cross-National Perspective." Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies 36(1): 1 - 26.

Week 13 – Our way of life?: integration, assimilation and multiculturalism in Australia compared

  • Jakubowicz, Andrew “Comparing Australian multiculturalism: the international dimension” in Andrew Jakubowicz & Christina Ho (eds.) 'For those who've come across the seas...': Australian multicultural theory, policy and practice, North Melbourne, Vic. Australian Scholarly Publishing, 2013. Chapter 2, Pages 15-30
  • Joppke, Christian, and Tobias Eule. "Chapter 18 - Civic integration in Europe: continuity versus discontinuity." In Freeman, Gary P., and Nikola Mirilovic, eds. Handbook on Migration and Social Policy. Edward Elgar Publishing, 2016: 343

Policies and Procedures

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central. Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Academic Honesty Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/academic_honesty/policy.html

Assessment Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/assessment/policy_2016.html

Grade Appeal Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/gradeappeal/policy.html

Complaint Management Procedure for Students and Members of the Public http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/complaint_management/procedure.html​

Disruption to Studies Policy (in effect until Dec 4th, 2017): http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/disruption_studies/policy.html

Special Consideration Policy (in effect from Dec 4th, 2017): https://staff.mq.edu.au/work/strategy-planning-and-governance/university-policies-and-procedures/policies/special-consideration

In addition, a number of other policies can be found in the Learning and Teaching Category of Policy Central.

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/support/student_conduct/

Results

Results shown in iLearn, or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent. For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au.

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Learning Skills

Learning Skills (mq.edu.au/learningskills) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to improve your marks and take control of your study.

Student Enquiry Service

For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at ask.mq.edu.au

Equity Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

IT Help

For help with University computer systems and technology, visit http://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/information_technology/help/

When using the University's IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use of IT Resources Policy. The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network including students.

Graduate Capabilities

PG - Discipline Knowledge and Skills

Our postgraduates will be able to demonstrate a significantly enhanced depth and breadth of knowledge, scholarly understanding, and specific subject content knowledge in their chosen fields.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Identify and comprehend the history of Australia's migration policy, and how it compares to other polities.
  • Identify and comprehend theories and typologies of migration policy, and how they might interact with public policy theory and comparative methods.
  • Identify and comprehend various aspects of Australia's migration policy and how that compares with other polities and/or regions, including, for example, policy regarding asylum, high and low skilled workers, citizenship, integration and multiculturalism, securitization, and irregular migrants.
  • Effectively research and present written work, including literature reviews and essays.
  • Effectively communicate and participate in class discussions and activities.

Assessment tasks

  • Literature review & rationale
  • Major essay
  • Participation

PG - Effective Communication

Our postgraduates will be able to communicate effectively and convey their views to different social, cultural, and professional audiences. They will be able to use a variety of technologically supported media to communicate with empathy using a range of written, spoken or visual formats.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Effectively research and present written work, including literature reviews and essays.
  • Effectively communicate and participate in class discussions and activities.

Assessment tasks

  • Literature review & rationale
  • Major essay
  • Participation

PG - Critical, Analytical and Integrative Thinking

Our postgraduates will be capable of utilising and reflecting on prior knowledge and experience, of applying higher level critical thinking skills, and of integrating and synthesising learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments. A characteristic of this form of thinking is the generation of new, professionally oriented knowledge through personal or group-based critique of practice and theory.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Identify and comprehend the history of Australia's migration policy, and how it compares to other polities.
  • Identify and comprehend theories and typologies of migration policy, and how they might interact with public policy theory and comparative methods.
  • Identify and comprehend various aspects of Australia's migration policy and how that compares with other polities and/or regions, including, for example, policy regarding asylum, high and low skilled workers, citizenship, integration and multiculturalism, securitization, and irregular migrants.
  • Effectively research and present written work, including literature reviews and essays.
  • Effectively communicate and participate in class discussions and activities.

Assessment tasks

  • Literature review & rationale
  • Major essay
  • Participation

PG - Research and Problem Solving Capability

Our postgraduates will be capable of systematic enquiry; able to use research skills to create new knowledge that can be applied to real world issues, or contribute to a field of study or practice to enhance society. They will be capable of creative questioning, problem finding and problem solving.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Identify and comprehend the history of Australia's migration policy, and how it compares to other polities.
  • Identify and comprehend theories and typologies of migration policy, and how they might interact with public policy theory and comparative methods.
  • Identify and comprehend various aspects of Australia's migration policy and how that compares with other polities and/or regions, including, for example, policy regarding asylum, high and low skilled workers, citizenship, integration and multiculturalism, securitization, and irregular migrants.
  • Effectively research and present written work, including literature reviews and essays.
  • Effectively communicate and participate in class discussions and activities.

Assessment tasks

  • Literature review & rationale
  • Major essay
  • Participation

PG - Engaged and Responsible, Active and Ethical Citizens

Our postgraduates will be ethically aware and capable of confident transformative action in relation to their professional responsibilities and the wider community. They will have a sense of connectedness with others and country and have a sense of mutual obligation. They will be able to appreciate the impact of their professional roles for social justice and inclusion related to national and global issues

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • Effectively communicate and participate in class discussions and activities.

Assessment tasks

  • Literature review & rationale
  • Participation

PG - Capable of Professional and Personal Judgment and Initiative

Our postgraduates will demonstrate a high standard of discernment and common sense in their professional and personal judgment. They will have the ability to make informed choices and decisions that reflect both the nature of their professional work and their personal perspectives.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • Effectively communicate and participate in class discussions and activities.

Assessment tasks

  • Literature review & rationale
  • Major essay
  • Participation