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ENVS718 – Environmental Planning

2017 – S2 Evening

General Information

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Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit Convenor
Peter Davies
Contact via peter.davies@mq.edu.au
12 Wally's Walk Room 435
Tuesdays and Wednesdays
Credit points Credit points
4
Prerequisites Prerequisites
Admission to MRes
Corequisites Corequisites
Co-badged status Co-badged status
Unit description Unit description
This unit gives students a detailed understanding of the origins and current issues that structure practice in environmental planning. Students are introduced to the history of planning and its intersection with environmental thought. By the end of the unit students will be able to recognise different theories of planning; identify the structure of planning systems; show how current issues such as climate change impinge on planning; and produce a professional planning communication document.

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at http://students.mq.edu.au/student_admin/enrolmentguide/academicdates/

Learning Outcomes

  1. Apply knowledge and understanding of theory and practice of environmental planning with an interdisciplinary focus to manage contemporary urban and regional environmental issues
  2. Understand and critically assess processes and structures of environmental and planning law and policy within the decision-making process
  3. Identify the roles of stakeholders in environmental planning decisions and their influence on outcomes
  4. Understand how environmental planning policies are developed and applied at a local, regional and metropolitan scale
  5. Write for different target audiences and critically read, think about, interpret and evaluate information related to the environment

General Assessment Information

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available athttp://students.mq.edu.au/student_admin/enrolmentguide/academicdates/

Learning Outcomes

  1. Demonstrated understanding of current progress on climate change policy, particularly in regards to mitigation and adaptation opportunities
  2. Ability to compare and contrast different approaches to climate change from perspectives of equity and justice
  3. Ability to identify diverse ethical, political, social and economic influences on human responses to climate change
  4. Demonstrated understanding of the scalar dimensions of human responses to climate change
  5. Skills to promote and pursue pathways to climate-resilient​ futures through a variety of communicative means
  6. Ability to work collaboratively and as part of a team on climate related issues

General Assessment Information

Marking rubrics:

Marking rubrics will be provided in class for each assessment task.  

Penalty for late submission of assessment tasks:

Assessment tasks are to be submitted on the date listed under the Assessment Tasks section of this Unit Guide. 5 marks will be deducted off the final mark for the assessment task for each day that the assessment task is late.  For example, for a student who initially receives a mark of 75 for an assessment task but this task was submitted two days late, they will be penalised a total of 10 marks - to bring a final mark of 65.  

Extensions:

Extensions must be requested in advance and in writing via email to your Unit Convenor. In the email, please explicitly state the reason for the request.

Assessments have been prepared in accordance with the University's Assessment Policy, effective 1 August 2016.

Grading will be undertaken in accordance with this policy (Schedule 2) and are aligned with the grading descriptors given below.   2.3       Grades for all individual assessment tasks will be released to students; it is not essential to also release the mark.   2.4       Grading decisions for each assessment task will be moderated against the standards before task results are released.   2.5       The method by which the results in individual assessment items are employed to arrive at the final result for a unit will be simple, transparent and communicated to students in their unit guide.   2.6       Final grades for the unit must reflect the descriptors given below:

ASSESSMENT GRADES AND STATUS

GRADE

RANGE

STATUS ( ‘Standard Grade’ in AMIS)

DESCRIPTION

HD

85-100

Pass

Provides consistent evidence of deep and critical understanding in relation to the learning outcomes. There is substantial originality, insight or creativity in identifying, generating and communicating competing arguments, perspectives or problem solving approaches; critical evaluation of problems, their solutions and their implications; creativity in application as appropriate to the program.

D

75-84

Pass

Provides evidence of integration and evaluation of critical ideas, principles and theories, distinctive insight and ability in applying relevant skills and concepts in relation to learning outcomes. There is demonstration of frequent originality or creativity in defining and analysing issues or problems and providing solutions; and the use of means of communication appropriate to the program and the audience.

CR

65-74

Pass

Provides evidence of learning that goes beyond replication of content knowledge or skills relevant to the learning outcomes. There is demonstration of substantial understanding of fundamental concepts in the field of study and the ability to apply these concepts in a variety of contexts; convincing argumentation with appropriate coherent justification; communication of ideas fluently and clearly in terms of the conventions of the program.

P

50-64

Pass

Provides sufficient evidence of the achievement of learning outcomes. There is demonstration of understanding and application of fundamental concepts of the program; routine argumentation with acceptable justification; communication of information and ideas adequately in terms of the conventions of the program. The learning attainment is considered satisfactory or adequate or competent or capable in relation to the specified outcomes.

F

0-49

Fail

Does not provide evidence of attainment of learning outcomes. There is missing or partial or superficial or faulty understanding and application of the fundamental concepts in the field of study; missing, undeveloped, inappropriate or confusing argumentation; incomplete, confusing or lacking communication of ideas in ways that give little attention to the conventions of the program.

FH 49 Fail Hurdle Student has obtained a raw mark over 50, yet failed all available attempts of at least one hurdle assessment (as described within Schedule 2: Unit Assessment Requirements).

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Hurdle Due
Planning and policy frameworks 25% No Week 3 16 August
Tutorial Skills 5% Week 7
Environmental Policy Review 35% No Monday 17 September
Preparation of an REF 35% No Week 12 31 October 2017

Planning and policy frameworks

Due: Week 3 16 August
Weighting: 25%

What makes a good environmental policy?

In answering this question you are to examine the academic literature, government guidelines and other technical reports and identify elements such as themes, framework, checklists, assessment criteria that can or should be used by policy makers. While there are a number of already published approaches, your task is to critically assess what has been published or prepared and develop your own ideas. Where you draw on other work these must be fully referenced. 

Max work length: 1500 including text, tables and figures (excluding references)


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Apply knowledge and understanding of theory and practice of environmental planning with an interdisciplinary focus to manage contemporary urban and regional environmental issues
  • Identify the roles of stakeholders in environmental planning decisions and their influence on outcomes
  • Understand how environmental planning policies are developed and applied at a local, regional and metropolitan scale

Tutorial Skills

Due: Week 7
Weighting: 5%

Task A. You will be given a building plan and asked to undertake a number of tasks using your scale ruler, referring to the relevant council LEP and DCP that would form the basis of an initial assessment as undertaken by a DA planner (Week 7).

This is an in-class task and no extensions will be provided. A failure to attend will result in 0 marks for the task.

 


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Identify the roles of stakeholders in environmental planning decisions and their influence on outcomes
  • Understand how environmental planning policies are developed and applied at a local, regional and metropolitan scale

Environmental Policy Review

Due: Monday 17 September
Weighting: 35%

 

The purpose of this assessment is to get students familiar with an area of environmental policy and practice.  Students are required to select ONE of the following areas (below). Your audience is a for a senior manager in government (you chose depending on your policy and or focus) and you are to include a 1 page executive summary with recommendations (that then need to be supported in the body of the report)

  1. Biodiversity protection (with a particular focus on policy instruments such as biobanking and the protections afforded by relevant legislation for threatened species and endangered ecological communities)
  2. Urban landscaping on private lands and the policy frameworks that can support urban ecology outcomes
  3. The management of urban soil contamination (in particular focusing on brownfield and greyfield development)
  4. Energy efficient building design for residential development
  5. Managing bushfire risk in urban areas with a particular focus on the environmental impacts that may relate to the protection of vegetation over assets and human health.

Your answer should address the following elements

  • Define the key issues
  • What is the evidence used to support the policy
  • How have key terms be defined
  • Summarise the history of and need for its development
  • Provide a brief summary of three similar policies from other jurisdictions (within Australian or international)
  • Outline the aims, objectives and key actions and how these are evaluated
  • Undertake a critical assessment of its effectiveness (this can draw on your framework from Assignment 1)
  • Make recommendations for your reader as to what should be done with respect to improving the current policy and or framework 

This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Apply knowledge and understanding of theory and practice of environmental planning with an interdisciplinary focus to manage contemporary urban and regional environmental issues
  • Understand and critically assess processes and structures of environmental and planning law and policy within the decision-making process
  • Identify the roles of stakeholders in environmental planning decisions and their influence on outcomes
  • Understand how environmental planning policies are developed and applied at a local, regional and metropolitan scale
  • Write for different target audiences and critically read, think about, interpret and evaluate information related to the environment

Preparation of an REF

Due: Week 12 31 October 2017
Weighting: 35%

This is a group assignment (maximum 4 students per group) but individual contributions are assessed by way of a peer review process. The task is to prepare a review of environmental factors (REF) that would accompany a development application for a project. This is designed as a practical task to test your application of theory and learning across the semester.

The preparation of an REF is the core business of most environmental consultants and planners. Details of the development and reference information will be provided in class.

1. Report: Each group will develop an REF and is worth 30% of your marks. The REF will be assessed and the group mark will be awarded to each student in the group (worth 30 marks of a total of 35 for this task)

2. Participation: The contribution of each student to the group report will be assessed by peer review using the SPARKPLUS software. The peer review will assess each group members' contribution to the core tasks as well as their teamwork skills throughout the whole project The results of the peer review will be used to convert the group report mark outlined in (1) into an individual mark

3. Reflection: 5/35 marks will be assessed on your personal reflection undertaking the assessment and how you and your group worked together (submitted individually via turnitin)

The inside front cover of your REF must contain a summary of the primary author for each section, the reviewer of the section, the overall project coordinator and who approved the final REF for submission. Note that the person that approves the REF will be the person that submits this via Turnitin.

The maximum length of your submission is 40 pages including diagrams, maps, plans, photos, appendix and references. It is expected that this be formatted in a professional manner as though you were a consultant submitting the REF for development assessment to government or your client. Your personal reflection is limited to 250 words (1 page)

 

 


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Understand and critically assess processes and structures of environmental and planning law and policy within the decision-making process
  • Identify the roles of stakeholders in environmental planning decisions and their influence on outcomes
  • Write for different target audiences and critically read, think about, interpret and evaluate information related to the environment

Delivery and Resources

Classes: ENVS 818 is available in internal mode in Semester 2. Attendance and participation in workshops and field trip is compulsory.   

Lectures and tutorials: Tuesday 6.00pm-9.00pm (3 hours)

Room: E6A 131

Field trip Saturday 26 August (10-4) location to be notified in class

Required and recommended reading: There are a number of general texts covering the subject matter of this course, and the important ones are listed below. None is required to be purchased by students.

It is, however, highly recommended that you a general one of the general texts on environmental planning and law such as:

Farrier, D. and Stein, P, 2011 The Environmental Law Handbook (5th edition) Redfern UNSW Sydney, or

 Lyster R., Lipman. Z., Franklin. N., Wiffen. G., Pearson. L, 2009 Environmental and Planning Law in New South Wales, Federation Press.

 Students will be required to access key NSW legislative provisions covered in the unit:

·         Environmental Planning and Assessment Act, 1979 as amended;

·         Environmental Planning and Assessment Regulation, 2000.

Copies of this legislation (including all amendments) are available at: http://www.legislation.nsw.gov.au

The Department of Planning (and Environment) web site is also an important reference point http://www.planning.nsw.gov.au.

Technology used and required

Access to the Internet and regular access to the unit’s ILearn website is recommended in ENVS818. ILearn will be used to communicate with students outside of class, provide links to relevant information and legislation, and post updates on assessments and other tasks. 

Unit Schedule

Wk

Date

Lectures

1

1 Aug

Introduction to urban and regional planning

2

8 Aug

Strategic planning and policy and its role in environmental planning

 3

15 Aug

Metropolitan and district planning: the role of planning authorities

4

22 Aug

26 Aug

Housing and urban growth

Field trip – location to be advised

5

29 Aug

Liveability and sustainability

6

5 Sept  

Transport planning

7

12 Sept

Master class - Zoning, map reading, scale rulers  and development controls

 

19 Sept

Mid semester break

 

26 Sept

Mid semester break

8

3 Oct

Urban ecology

9

10 Oct

No class in lieu of field trip

10

17 Oct

Sustainable buildings and design

11

24 Oct

Local government planning and policy

12

31 Oct

Development assessment  - applying policies and regulations

13

 7 Nov

Open space, parks and recreation Tentative field Trip: North Sydney Coal loader

Learning and Teaching Activities

Lectures

Lectures from staff and guest lectures from those practising in the environmental planning field

Tutorials

Academic and student lead tutorial discussions based on readings and reflective practice

Field visit

Site visits (within campus as part of tutorials and externally for assessments) examining how environmental planning concepts can inform practical guidelines

Personal reading

Reading of academic journals and industry reports

Presentations

Student presentations based on unit content and reflective reading and case studies

Policies and Procedures

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central. Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Academic Honesty Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/academic_honesty/policy.html

Assessment Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/assessment/policy_2016.html

Grade Appeal Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/gradeappeal/policy.html

Complaint Management Procedure for Students and Members of the Public http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/complaint_management/procedure.html​

Disruption to Studies Policy (in effect until Dec 4th, 2017): http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/disruption_studies/policy.html

Special Consideration Policy (in effect from Dec 4th, 2017): https://staff.mq.edu.au/work/strategy-planning-and-governance/university-policies-and-procedures/policies/special-consideration

In addition, a number of other policies can be found in the Learning and Teaching Category of Policy Central.

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/support/student_conduct/

Results

Results shown in iLearn, or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent. For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au.

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Learning Skills

Learning Skills (mq.edu.au/learningskills) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to improve your marks and take control of your study.

Student Enquiry Service

For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at ask.mq.edu.au

Equity Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

IT Help

For help with University computer systems and technology, visit http://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/information_technology/help/

When using the University's IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use of IT Resources Policy. The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network including students.

Graduate Capabilities

PG - Discipline Knowledge and Skills

Our postgraduates will be able to demonstrate a significantly enhanced depth and breadth of knowledge, scholarly understanding, and specific subject content knowledge in their chosen fields.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Apply knowledge and understanding of theory and practice of environmental planning with an interdisciplinary focus to manage contemporary urban and regional environmental issues
  • Understand how environmental planning policies are developed and applied at a local, regional and metropolitan scale
  • Write for different target audiences and critically read, think about, interpret and evaluate information related to the environment

Assessment tasks

  • Planning and policy frameworks
  • Tutorial Skills
  • Environmental Policy Review
  • Preparation of an REF

Learning and teaching activities

  • Lectures from staff and guest lectures from those practising in the environmental planning field
  • Academic and student lead tutorial discussions based on readings and reflective practice
  • Site visits (within campus as part of tutorials and externally for assessments) examining how environmental planning concepts can inform practical guidelines
  • Reading of academic journals and industry reports
  • Student presentations based on unit content and reflective reading and case studies

PG - Critical, Analytical and Integrative Thinking

Our postgraduates will be capable of utilising and reflecting on prior knowledge and experience, of applying higher level critical thinking skills, and of integrating and synthesising learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments. A characteristic of this form of thinking is the generation of new, professionally oriented knowledge through personal or group-based critique of practice and theory.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Understand and critically assess processes and structures of environmental and planning law and policy within the decision-making process
  • Identify the roles of stakeholders in environmental planning decisions and their influence on outcomes
  • Understand how environmental planning policies are developed and applied at a local, regional and metropolitan scale
  • Write for different target audiences and critically read, think about, interpret and evaluate information related to the environment

Assessment tasks

  • Planning and policy frameworks
  • Tutorial Skills
  • Environmental Policy Review
  • Preparation of an REF

Learning and teaching activities

  • Lectures from staff and guest lectures from those practising in the environmental planning field
  • Academic and student lead tutorial discussions based on readings and reflective practice
  • Site visits (within campus as part of tutorials and externally for assessments) examining how environmental planning concepts can inform practical guidelines
  • Reading of academic journals and industry reports
  • Student presentations based on unit content and reflective reading and case studies

PG - Research and Problem Solving Capability

Our postgraduates will be capable of systematic enquiry; able to use research skills to create new knowledge that can be applied to real world issues, or contribute to a field of study or practice to enhance society. They will be capable of creative questioning, problem finding and problem solving.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Understand and critically assess processes and structures of environmental and planning law and policy within the decision-making process
  • Identify the roles of stakeholders in environmental planning decisions and their influence on outcomes
  • Write for different target audiences and critically read, think about, interpret and evaluate information related to the environment

Assessment tasks

  • Planning and policy frameworks
  • Environmental Policy Review
  • Preparation of an REF

Learning and teaching activities

  • Lectures from staff and guest lectures from those practising in the environmental planning field
  • Academic and student lead tutorial discussions based on readings and reflective practice
  • Site visits (within campus as part of tutorials and externally for assessments) examining how environmental planning concepts can inform practical guidelines
  • Student presentations based on unit content and reflective reading and case studies

PG - Effective Communication

Our postgraduates will be able to communicate effectively and convey their views to different social, cultural, and professional audiences. They will be able to use a variety of technologically supported media to communicate with empathy using a range of written, spoken or visual formats.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Identify the roles of stakeholders in environmental planning decisions and their influence on outcomes
  • Write for different target audiences and critically read, think about, interpret and evaluate information related to the environment

Assessment task

  • Environmental Policy Review

Learning and teaching activity

  • Academic and student lead tutorial discussions based on readings and reflective practice
  • Student presentations based on unit content and reflective reading and case studies

PG - Engaged and Responsible, Active and Ethical Citizens

Our postgraduates will be ethically aware and capable of confident transformative action in relation to their professional responsibilities and the wider community. They will have a sense of connectedness with others and country and have a sense of mutual obligation. They will be able to appreciate the impact of their professional roles for social justice and inclusion related to national and global issues

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Apply knowledge and understanding of theory and practice of environmental planning with an interdisciplinary focus to manage contemporary urban and regional environmental issues
  • Understand and critically assess processes and structures of environmental and planning law and policy within the decision-making process

PG - Capable of Professional and Personal Judgment and Initiative

Our postgraduates will demonstrate a high standard of discernment and common sense in their professional and personal judgment. They will have the ability to make informed choices and decisions that reflect both the nature of their professional work and their personal perspectives.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Understand and critically assess processes and structures of environmental and planning law and policy within the decision-making process
  • Identify the roles of stakeholders in environmental planning decisions and their influence on outcomes
  • Understand how environmental planning policies are developed and applied at a local, regional and metropolitan scale
  • Write for different target audiences and critically read, think about, interpret and evaluate information related to the environment

Assessment task

  • Preparation of an REF

Learning and teaching activity

  • Academic and student lead tutorial discussions based on readings and reflective practice
  • Site visits (within campus as part of tutorials and externally for assessments) examining how environmental planning concepts can inform practical guidelines

Changes from Previous Offering

The unit for 2017 has a greater focus on urban environments and the every changing planning and policy frameworks impacting on Sydney and cities generally. This reflects the current NSW government focus on strategic planning and the ongoing revision of environmental planning instruments and related policies.    

Field Trip - Work, Health and Safety

The safety of you and those around you is our highest priority. Consequently, ALL participants in fieldwork activities are obliged to work and behave appropriately in the field, and to take care to protect their own health, safety and welfare and that of fellow fieldwork participants. You are required to follow instructions from the Fieldwork Leader at all times.

Prior to the fieldwork, you must let the Fieldwork Leader know of any allergies, special dietary requirements or medical considerations that may affect your ability to participate in fieldwork. You will need to complete a declaration of a known medical condition form, outlining a treatment plan for your condition. Details of your responsible next of kin must also be provided incase of emergencies.

You are required to wear and carry clothing and footwear as appropriate to the fieldwork situation. Your Fieldwork Leader will advise you as to what these are prior to the fieldtrip. Irrespective of the activity, footwear must be worn. For terrestrial fieldwork, ankle to knee protection must be worn either in the form of either long trousers or gaiters. For marine fieldwork, appropriate clothing to protect against sunburn and exposure should be worn. For all fieldwork activities, a hat, sunscreen, insect repellent and items to protect against unexpected weather changes, such as rain & cold, are strongly recommended. The Fieldwork Leader reserves the right to exclude anyone that is ill-equipped from the activity.

If you are taking any medication, please ensure that you take sufficient supplies with you on the field trip. The University’s staff are unable, by law, to provide this to you. This includes pain relief, such as panadol or nurofen, cold and flu medication and anti-histamines for allergies.

If you need to leave the field location for any reason prior to completion of the scheduled activities, you must first inform the Fieldwork Leader. In the event of illness or injury, please let the Fieldwork Leader know immediately. All injury’s or incidents must be reported via the on-line reporting system: http://www.ohs.mq.edu.au/form5a.php

Alcohol is a significant contributing factor in many incidents and acts of prejudicial conduct. Alcohol must not be consumed when undertaking fieldwork activities or when using a motor vehicle/machinery. After-hours consumption of alcohol is at the discretion of the Fieldwork Leader. Anyone acting irresponsibly or in any way deemed to be a danger to themselves or others by the Fieldwork Leader will be required to leave the field trip, return to Sydney at their own expense and report to the Head of Department. The consequences of this may include exclusion from the Unit of study or your Degree program.

For more information, contact:

Russell Field

Fieldwork Manager (Dept of Environmental Sciences)

Macquarie University NSW 2109.

(W) 98508341

Requirements to complete this unit successfully

Compulsory attendance and assessment submission

In order to successfully complete this unit and receive a minimum Pass grade, students must:

  1. Attend and participate lectures and tutorials 
  2. Submit all assessments;
  3. Meet the minimum level of achievement expected of a postgraduate student, as outlined in the General Assessment Criteria.

Non-attendance at the major field trip for any reason other than those outlined in the Disruption to Studies Policy may result in an automatic fail.

Unit Home Page

This unit has a home page that can be accessed through the Macquarie University online facility (ilearn.mq.edu.au). It contains the usual discussion page, mail page and lecture notes page. As the semester progresses, it will be used to circulate data and other materials related to the course, field trips and assessments.