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CHN 330 – The Chinese Classics

2017 – S1 Day

General Information

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Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff
Shirley Chan
unit convenor
Shirley Chan
Contact via 9850 7021
W6A226
Wednesday 10:00am-11:00am, Thursday 2:00pm-3:00pm by appointment
Credit points Credit points
3
Prerequisites Prerequisites
6cp at 200 level including (CHN208 or CHN209 or CHN223)
Corequisites Corequisites
Co-badged status Co-badged status
Unit description Unit description
This unit focuses on reading and interpreting classic Chinese texts, in particular the philosophical works which originated from some major schools of thought in ancient China. A selection of Chinese canonical texts, especially the Confucian Four Books and Five Classics, are read and discussed. Traditionally these texts were the subject of mandatory study by Confucian scholars who wished to become government officials, and no doubt have been sources of the Chinese cultural and political foundation for more than 2000 years. Other philosophical texts, such as the Daode Jing and the Zhuangzi are also introduced. Classes are in English and Chinese.

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at http://students.mq.edu.au/student_admin/enrolmentguide/academicdates/

Learning Outcomes

  1. to be able to comprehend the traditional form of the Chinese script
  2. gain a broad familiarity with the key genres of literary and philosophical texts in ancient China through extensive reading in English translation
  3. to show capacity for analytical and critical thinking as well as appreciation of, and respect for cultural diversities
  4. to acquire foundational skills in the reading of classical Chinese through intensive reading of selective texts from the Chinese tradition;
  5. to be able to engage in independent and reflective learning through assessing and responding to ideas

General Assessment Information

Indicative examples of assessment tasks will be available on iLearn.

Extensions and Special Consideration

Short Term Extensions

Requests for assignment extensions due to unavoidable and unforseen circumstances of less than three days duration (eg short term illness or misadventure) must be made to the convenor via ask.mq.edu.au before the due date if possible, or immediately after the disruption. Approvals of extensions must be noted on the assignment cover sheet.

Assignments that are handed in later than the due date, where no extension has been granted, or are handed in later than the extension date without being granted further extension or special consideration will be penalised.

Late submissions will be penalised by 5% for each day (including weekends) the assignment is late. No assessment tasks will be accepted after corrections and feedback has been provided to the class. Assessment tasks handed in early will not be marked and returned before the due date.

Serious Illness and Unavoidable Disruption

If your performance has been affected for a period of 3 days or more as a result of serious unavoidable disruption or illness, you are advised to inform the unit convenor and tutor of the problem at the earliest possible opportunity. You must supply documentary evidence of the extended disruption and submit an Application for Special Consideration via ask.mq.edu.au. (see below).

No assessment work will be accepted for marking beyond Week 14 unless you have submitted an Application for Special Consideration via ask.mq.edu.au with adequate and appropriate supporting evidence and have been granted special consideration. Please note that requests for special consideration for long term or serious reasons are not granted automatically, and are reserved for unforeseen and serious circumstances such as prolonged & chronic illness, hospitalisation or bereavement in your immediate family which have affected your performance over the course of the semester; or in cases of unavoidable disruption or misadventure during the formal examination period. If you believe that you qualify for special consideration, please contact the teaching staff as soon as is practically possible and lodge the application.

Special Consideration Policy

http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/special_consideration/policy.html

Required and recommended resources

Readings in research and translation methodologies, see also:

Writing a Research Paper

An excellent guide from Purdue University

http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/658/03/

There are many more guides available online as well as in the library.

The university runs a series of workshop on learning skills and completing assignments. Please check up the details via the following link:

http://www.students.mq.edu.au/support/learning_skills/undergraduate/workshops/

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Due
Class participation/discussion 20% Weeks 1-13
Presentation 35% Weeks 5-12
Final test 45% Week 13

Class participation/discussion

Due: Weeks 1-13
Weighting: 20%

Participation will be marked on attendance, willingness to participate in class discussion, preparation and performance of reading and responding to questions. Students are expected to be well prepared in order to participate in class discussion – this will ensure good use of class time as well as improving your learning skills and sharing your knowledge with others.Class attendance and participation is expected and will be part of the assessment. This means you not only come and sign in the class but come well prepared and participate in class discussion. You need to read the assigned reading material and think about the topics and share your thought with others. Your marks for class attendance and performance will be determined by

a)    Whether you attend class regularly or not; b)    How much effort you have taken to prepare for the class; c)    How actively you participate in class discussion including your contribution to the discussion after group presentation; and d)    How helpful your comments are on the work of our fellow students.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • to be able to comprehend the traditional form of the Chinese script
  • gain a broad familiarity with the key genres of literary and philosophical texts in ancient China through extensive reading in English translation
  • to show capacity for analytical and critical thinking as well as appreciation of, and respect for cultural diversities
  • to acquire foundational skills in the reading of classical Chinese through intensive reading of selective texts from the Chinese tradition;
  • to be able to engage in independent and reflective learning through assessing and responding to ideas

Presentation

Due: Weeks 5-12
Weighting: 35%

There will be one group (two-person) presentation.  In the beginning of the semester, you will be asked to choose a tutorial topic.  You are expected to lead a discussion on your chosen topic for that week. Your oral presentation is expected to be 20 minutes in length (no more than 10 min each person).  You have to finish your presentation within the time limit or marks will be deducted. The group project should reflect the collective efforts of every member of your group.  You should be prepared for the rest of the class to raise questions.  You will need to prepare a 2 page report (20%) which needs to be posted on the iLearn in the discussion forum AND the Turnitin a week before the actual presentation (15%). 

In preparing to lead discussion, you may wish to consider the following questions: 

1)      What are the readings about? 

2)      What are the main points being argued? 

3)      What evidence is marshalled to support the author’s argument? 

4)      Do you agree/disagree with the arguments put forward in the readings? 

5)      What did you find most interesting about the topic or the reading? 

6)      How does this discussion contribute to your understanding/knowledge of Chinese culture, literature, philosophy, history and other areas covered in this unit.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • to be able to comprehend the traditional form of the Chinese script
  • gain a broad familiarity with the key genres of literary and philosophical texts in ancient China through extensive reading in English translation
  • to show capacity for analytical and critical thinking as well as appreciation of, and respect for cultural diversities
  • to acquire foundational skills in the reading of classical Chinese through intensive reading of selective texts from the Chinese tradition;
  • to be able to engage in independent and reflective learning through assessing and responding to ideas

Final test

Due: Week 13
Weighting: 45%

In week 13 you will be given a written test (1.5 hours) based on the readings similar to those covered in the class. You will be translating the texts and answer the questions related to the readings.

      


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • to be able to comprehend the traditional form of the Chinese script
  • gain a broad familiarity with the key genres of literary and philosophical texts in ancient China through extensive reading in English translation
  • to show capacity for analytical and critical thinking as well as appreciation of, and respect for cultural diversities
  • to acquire foundational skills in the reading of classical Chinese through intensive reading of selective texts from the Chinese tradition;
  • to be able to engage in independent and reflective learning through assessing and responding to ideas

Delivery and Resources

This is CHN330 The Chinese Classics is designed for students who have some knowledge in Chinese language equivalent to CHN233 (Intermediate Chinese) or above. Selected texts will be studied in Chinese, in translation, and backgrounds and histories of these texts. Students will be encouraged to pursue their own interests through choice of presentations,  group discussion, readings and annotated translations.

The website Chinese text project http://ctext.org/ is extremely useful and you are encouraged to consult this site for the early texts as well as English translations of the texts although you should assess other sources for the same purposes. 

The Scripta Sinica 漢籍電子文獻資料庫 database (from Academia Sinica) contains almost all of the important Chinese classics, especially those related to Chinese history.

Treasures of Chinese Classics (Guoxuebaodian 國學寶典) brings together a collection of several thousand searchable Chinese texts, including classics, works of history, geography, and medicine, collected writings, novels, poetry, and drama.  Also includes a character dictionary 國學字典, name dictionary 人名詞典 giving brief biographies of writers and scholars, and a title dictionary 書名詞典 with short abstracts of the works derived from the 四库总目提要 and other sources.

This is a 300 level unit and requires a considerable amount of private reading, research and study of original works, histories of literature and web resources.   Students are encouraged to attend all classes and tutorials are compulsory with tutorial discussion strongly emphasizing student engagement. To benefit the most from the course, students are required to be active, responsible participants in their own learning, and to develop indpendent analytical and research skills in Chinese culture, history and society by reading and analysing both Chinese and English sources which should not be confined to the recommended reading list. Students should complete assessments on time by following instructions. You should check iLearn regularly http://ilearn.mq.edu.au/my/under the unit concerned, for announcements and resource information posted by the convenor.

Login is via: https://ilearn.mq.edu.au/

Is my unit in iLearn?: http://help.ilearn.mq.edu.au/unitsonline/ Use this link to check when your online unit will become available.

Technology

Students are required to have regular access to a computer and the internet. Mobile devices alone are not sufficient.

Policies and Procedures

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central. Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Academic Honesty Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/academic_honesty/policy.html

Assessment Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/assessment/policy_2016.html

Grade Appeal Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/gradeappeal/policy.html

Complaint Management Procedure for Students and Members of the Public http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/complaint_management/procedure.html​

Disruption to Studies Policy http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/disruption_studies/policy.html The Disruption to Studies Policy is effective from March 3 2014 and replaces the Special Consideration Policy.

In addition, a number of other policies can be found in the Learning and Teaching Category of Policy Central.

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/support/student_conduct/

Results

Results shown in iLearn, or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent. For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au.

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Learning Skills

Learning Skills (mq.edu.au/learningskills) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to improve your marks and take control of your study.

Student Enquiry Service

For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at ask.mq.edu.au

Equity Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

IT Help

For help with University computer systems and technology, visit http://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/information_technology/help/

When using the University's IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use of IT Resources Policy. The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network including students.

Graduate Capabilities

Discipline Specific Knowledge and Skills

Our graduates will take with them the intellectual development, depth and breadth of knowledge, scholarly understanding, and specific subject content in their chosen fields to make them competent and confident in their subject or profession. They will be able to demonstrate, where relevant, professional technical competence and meet professional standards. They will be able to articulate the structure of knowledge of their discipline, be able to adapt discipline-specific knowledge to novel situations, and be able to contribute from their discipline to inter-disciplinary solutions to problems.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • to be able to comprehend the traditional form of the Chinese script
  • gain a broad familiarity with the key genres of literary and philosophical texts in ancient China through extensive reading in English translation
  • to show capacity for analytical and critical thinking as well as appreciation of, and respect for cultural diversities
  • to acquire foundational skills in the reading of classical Chinese through intensive reading of selective texts from the Chinese tradition;
  • to be able to engage in independent and reflective learning through assessing and responding to ideas

Assessment tasks

  • Class participation/discussion
  • Presentation
  • Final test

Critical, Analytical and Integrative Thinking

We want our graduates to be capable of reasoning, questioning and analysing, and to integrate and synthesise learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments; to be able to critique constraints, assumptions and limitations; to be able to think independently and systemically in relation to scholarly activity, in the workplace, and in the world. We want them to have a level of scientific and information technology literacy.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • to be able to comprehend the traditional form of the Chinese script
  • gain a broad familiarity with the key genres of literary and philosophical texts in ancient China through extensive reading in English translation
  • to show capacity for analytical and critical thinking as well as appreciation of, and respect for cultural diversities
  • to acquire foundational skills in the reading of classical Chinese through intensive reading of selective texts from the Chinese tradition;
  • to be able to engage in independent and reflective learning through assessing and responding to ideas

Assessment tasks

  • Class participation/discussion
  • Presentation
  • Final test

Creative and Innovative

Our graduates will also be capable of creative thinking and of creating knowledge. They will be imaginative and open to experience and capable of innovation at work and in the community. We want them to be engaged in applying their critical, creative thinking.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • to show capacity for analytical and critical thinking as well as appreciation of, and respect for cultural diversities
  • to acquire foundational skills in the reading of classical Chinese through intensive reading of selective texts from the Chinese tradition;
  • to be able to engage in independent and reflective learning through assessing and responding to ideas

Assessment tasks

  • Presentation
  • Final test

Effective Communication

We want to develop in our students the ability to communicate and convey their views in forms effective with different audiences. We want our graduates to take with them the capability to read, listen, question, gather and evaluate information resources in a variety of formats, assess, write clearly, speak effectively, and to use visual communication and communication technologies as appropriate.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • to be able to comprehend the traditional form of the Chinese script
  • gain a broad familiarity with the key genres of literary and philosophical texts in ancient China through extensive reading in English translation
  • to show capacity for analytical and critical thinking as well as appreciation of, and respect for cultural diversities
  • to acquire foundational skills in the reading of classical Chinese through intensive reading of selective texts from the Chinese tradition;
  • to be able to engage in independent and reflective learning through assessing and responding to ideas

Assessment tasks

  • Class participation/discussion
  • Presentation
  • Final test

Engaged and Ethical Local and Global citizens

As local citizens our graduates will be aware of indigenous perspectives and of the nation's historical context. They will be engaged with the challenges of contemporary society and with knowledge and ideas. We want our graduates to have respect for diversity, to be open-minded, sensitive to others and inclusive, and to be open to other cultures and perspectives: they should have a level of cultural literacy. Our graduates should be aware of disadvantage and social justice, and be willing to participate to help create a wiser and better society.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • gain a broad familiarity with the key genres of literary and philosophical texts in ancient China through extensive reading in English translation
  • to show capacity for analytical and critical thinking as well as appreciation of, and respect for cultural diversities
  • to be able to engage in independent and reflective learning through assessing and responding to ideas

Assessment tasks

  • Class participation/discussion
  • Presentation
  • Final test

Socially and Environmentally Active and Responsible

We want our graduates to be aware of and have respect for self and others; to be able to work with others as a leader and a team player; to have a sense of connectedness with others and country; and to have a sense of mutual obligation. Our graduates should be informed and active participants in moving society towards sustainability.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • to show capacity for analytical and critical thinking as well as appreciation of, and respect for cultural diversities
  • to be able to engage in independent and reflective learning through assessing and responding to ideas

Assessment tasks

  • Class participation/discussion
  • Presentation
  • Final test

Capable of Professional and Personal Judgement and Initiative

We want our graduates to have emotional intelligence and sound interpersonal skills and to demonstrate discernment and common sense in their professional and personal judgement. They will exercise initiative as needed. They will be capable of risk assessment, and be able to handle ambiguity and complexity, enabling them to be adaptable in diverse and changing environments.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • gain a broad familiarity with the key genres of literary and philosophical texts in ancient China through extensive reading in English translation
  • to show capacity for analytical and critical thinking as well as appreciation of, and respect for cultural diversities
  • to be able to engage in independent and reflective learning through assessing and responding to ideas

Assessment tasks

  • Class participation/discussion
  • Presentation
  • Final test

Commitment to Continuous Learning

Our graduates will have enquiring minds and a literate curiosity which will lead them to pursue knowledge for its own sake. They will continue to pursue learning in their careers and as they participate in the world. They will be capable of reflecting on their experiences and relationships with others and the environment, learning from them, and growing - personally, professionally and socially.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • to be able to comprehend the traditional form of the Chinese script
  • gain a broad familiarity with the key genres of literary and philosophical texts in ancient China through extensive reading in English translation
  • to show capacity for analytical and critical thinking as well as appreciation of, and respect for cultural diversities
  • to acquire foundational skills in the reading of classical Chinese through intensive reading of selective texts from the Chinese tradition;
  • to be able to engage in independent and reflective learning through assessing and responding to ideas

Assessment task

  • Final test

Problem Solving and Research Capability

Our graduates should be capable of researching; of analysing, and interpreting and assessing data and information in various forms; of drawing connections across fields of knowledge; and they should be able to relate their knowledge to complex situations at work or in the world, in order to diagnose and solve problems. We want them to have the confidence to take the initiative in doing so, within an awareness of their own limitations.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • to be able to comprehend the traditional form of the Chinese script
  • gain a broad familiarity with the key genres of literary and philosophical texts in ancient China through extensive reading in English translation
  • to show capacity for analytical and critical thinking as well as appreciation of, and respect for cultural diversities
  • to acquire foundational skills in the reading of classical Chinese through intensive reading of selective texts from the Chinese tradition;
  • to be able to engage in independent and reflective learning through assessing and responding to ideas

Assessment tasks

  • Class participation/discussion
  • Presentation
  • Final test