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ENGX205 – Australian Literature

2017 – S2 OUA

General Information

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Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit Co-ordinator, lecturer
Toby Davidson
Contact via toby.davidson@mq.edu.au
By email appointment
Tutor, online discussion co-ordinator
Kirstin Mills
Contact via Email
By email
Kirstin Mills
Prerequisites Prerequisites
ENGX120 or ENG110 or ENGL120
Corequisites Corequisites
Co-badged status Co-badged status
Unit description Unit description
This unit explores the relation between literature and Australian society in the twentieth century. Literature is broadly conceived, as social critique or social settlement, with a focus on the questions asked by Indigenous Australian writing. Readers are introduced to novels, poetry, theatre and film from across the century, including contemporary Australian writing. The representation of relations between place and culture; the city/bush divide; history; memory and subjectivity; class and social change; gender codes and sexuality; recent challenges to unifying national myths; Indigenous writing; and (post)colonial frames form some of the unit's concerns.

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at https://www.open.edu.au/student-admin-and-support/key-dates/

Learning Outcomes

  1. Demonstration of independent critical research analysis leading to the communication of an essay-based argument
  2. Ability to work contextually between genres, eras and media (eg. from printed to cinematic to online texts and interactive formats)
  3. Ability to apply literary insights into broader social and environmental contexts
  4. Professionalism in terms of punctuality, required levels of tutorial and online participation, task management, team-based communication and presentation of work
  5. Ability to take the insights and skills of this unit into further learning and to encourage the learning of others

General Assessment Information

In all assessments, communication with your tutor is vital if you do not understand what is required, or have difficulty completing the relevant task on time. This is a basic level of courtesy and professionalism required in most university units and workplaces. 

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Hurdle Due
Participation 20% Weeks 1-12
Quiz 10% End of Week 3
AustLit Article Analysis 30% End of Week 7
Research Essay 40% End of Week 13

Participation

Due: Weeks 1-12
Weighting: 20%

Weekly tutorial participation, comprising of punctuality, demonstrated preparation (reading the set texts prior to class discussions) and quality of overall contributions.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Demonstration of independent critical research analysis leading to the communication of an essay-based argument
  • Ability to work contextually between genres, eras and media (eg. from printed to cinematic to online texts and interactive formats)
  • Ability to apply literary insights into broader social and environmental contexts
  • Professionalism in terms of punctuality, required levels of tutorial and online participation, task management, team-based communication and presentation of work
  • Ability to take the insights and skills of this unit into further learning and to encourage the learning of others

Quiz

Due: End of Week 3
Weighting: 10%

See unit ilearn site for details.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Demonstration of independent critical research analysis leading to the communication of an essay-based argument
  • Ability to work contextually between genres, eras and media (eg. from printed to cinematic to online texts and interactive formats)
  • Ability to apply literary insights into broader social and environmental contexts
  • Professionalism in terms of punctuality, required levels of tutorial and online participation, task management, team-based communication and presentation of work
  • Ability to take the insights and skills of this unit into further learning and to encourage the learning of others

AustLit Article Analysis

Due: End of Week 7
Weighting: 30%

See unit ilearn site for details.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Demonstration of independent critical research analysis leading to the communication of an essay-based argument
  • Ability to work contextually between genres, eras and media (eg. from printed to cinematic to online texts and interactive formats)
  • Ability to apply literary insights into broader social and environmental contexts
  • Ability to take the insights and skills of this unit into further learning and to encourage the learning of others

Research Essay

Due: End of Week 13
Weighting: 40%

See unit ilearn site for details.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Demonstration of independent critical research analysis leading to the communication of an essay-based argument
  • Ability to work contextually between genres, eras and media (eg. from printed to cinematic to online texts and interactive formats)
  • Ability to apply literary insights into broader social and environmental contexts
  • Ability to take the insights and skills of this unit into further learning and to encourage the learning of others

Delivery and Resources

CLASSES

Lectures are recorded with powerpoints through the ALP system. Students are expect to contribute to ALL weekly online discussions. 

 

REQUIRED AND RECOMMENDED TEXTS AND/OR MATERIALS

This unit assumes no prior reading in Australian literature, so the early attaining of key texts and iLearn access is crucial.

 

REQUIRED READING

You are required to purchase, or loan, the following texts (listed in order of reading). Texts are available from the Co-op bookshop on campus before semester starts and also as ebooks. The earlier you begin reading, the better chance you will give yourself to excel in this unit, not least because you will have more time to reflect on content and to complete assessments. 

  • N. Jose, ed. Macquarie Pen Anthology of Australian Literature (select readings provided Week 1, read section introductions prior to this if possible)
  • F. Webb, Collected Poems (esp. 'Leichhardt in Theatre', 'The Ghost of the Cock')

 

The combined number of pages required to be read across 12 tutorials is 160 pages (including play extracts), less than the average novella, with an emphasis on shorter forms such as poetry, short stories, letters and play extracts. Australian novels are separately offered at 300-level in ENGL308: Australian Fiction in the Digital Age.

 

Note: There is no ENGL205 Unit Reader. The Macquarie Pen Anthology of Australian Literature provides criticism of key epochs in Australian literature. The Cambridge Companion to Australian Literature (E. Webby, ed., book and ebook at Macquarie library) can be used for further critical analysis if required.

 

RECOMMENDED READING

Online research resources, such as the Australian Dictionary of Biography and Austlit, will be provided via iLearn (weblinks section). 

 

UNIT WEBPAGE AND TECHNOLOGY USED AND REQUIRED

Online units can be accessed at: http://ilearn.mq.edu.au/.

PC and Internet access are required. Basic computer skills (e.g., internet browsing) and skills in word processing are also a requirement. Please consult teaching staff for any further, more specific requirements.

Unit Schedule

Provided in Week 1. See Delivery and Resources: Required Reading above for the best way to achieve a running start to the unit prior to Week 1.

 

Policies and Procedures

Late Submission

Unless otherwise stated, late submission of written work will result in a deduction of 10% of the mark awarded for each week or part of a week beyond the due date, or date to which an extension has been granted.

Extension Request

Disruption to Studies Procedure (http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/disruption_studies/procedure.html)

The University recognises that students may experience disruptions that adversely affect their academic performance in assessment activities.

The disruption to studies policy (http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/disruption_studies/policy.html) applies only to serious and unavoidable disruptions that arise after a study period has commenced.

Serious and unavoidable disruption

The University classifies a disruption as serious and unavoidable if it:

  • could not have reasonably been anticipated, avoided or guarded against by the student; and
  • was beyond the student's control; and
  • caused substantial disruption to the student's capacity for effective study and/or completion of required work; and
  • occurred during an event critical study period and was at least three (3) consecutive days duration, and/or
  • prevented completion of a final examination.

If you feel that you've been impacted by a serious and unavoidable disruption to study situation, submit an application as follows:

  1. Visit Ask MQ (https://ask.mq.edu.au) and use your OneID to log in via 'Current student domestic and international'
  2. Under 'Forms' select 'disruptions' and fill in your relevant details.
  3. Attach supporting documents by clicking 'Add a reply', click 'browse' and navigating to the files you want to attach, then click 'submit form' to send your notification and supporting documents
  4. Please keep copies of your original documents, as they may be requested in the future as part of the assessment process

Review

Once your submission is assessed, recommendations are sent to your unit convenor to ensure an appropriate solution for affected assessment(s) is organised.

OUA Specific Policies and Procedures

OUA Special Circumstances Process

Special Circumstances refers to late withdrawal from a unit and your request to have your circumstances taken into account for a possible refund of fees and removal of a "fail" result.

Applications for Special Circumstances are to be submitted to Open Universities Australia directly:

https://www.open.edu.au/public/student-admin-and-support/student-support-services/special-circumstances

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central. Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Academic Honesty Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/academic_honesty/policy.html

Assessment Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/assessment/policy_2016.html

Grade Appeal Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/gradeappeal/policy.html

Complaint Management Procedure for Students and Members of the Public http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/complaint_management/procedure.html​

Disruption to Studies Policy (in effect until Dec 4th, 2017): http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/disruption_studies/policy.html

Special Consideration Policy (in effect from Dec 4th, 2017): https://staff.mq.edu.au/work/strategy-planning-and-governance/university-policies-and-procedures/policies/special-consideration

In addition, a number of other policies can be found in the Learning and Teaching Category of Policy Central.

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/support/student_conduct/

Results

Results shown in iLearn, or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent. For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au.

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Learning Skills

Learning Skills (mq.edu.au/learningskills) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to improve your marks and take control of your study.

Student Enquiry Service

For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at ask.mq.edu.au

Equity Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

IT Help

For help with University computer systems and technology, visit http://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/information_technology/help/

When using the University's IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use of IT Resources Policy. The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network including students.

Graduate Capabilities

Socially and Environmentally Active and Responsible

We want our graduates to be aware of and have respect for self and others; to be able to work with others as a leader and a team player; to have a sense of connectedness with others and country; and to have a sense of mutual obligation. Our graduates should be informed and active participants in moving society towards sustainability.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Ability to apply literary insights into broader social and environmental contexts
  • Professionalism in terms of punctuality, required levels of tutorial and online participation, task management, team-based communication and presentation of work
  • Ability to take the insights and skills of this unit into further learning and to encourage the learning of others

Assessment tasks

  • Participation
  • Quiz
  • AustLit Article Analysis
  • Research Essay

Critical, Analytical and Integrative Thinking

We want our graduates to be capable of reasoning, questioning and analysing, and to integrate and synthesise learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments; to be able to critique constraints, assumptions and limitations; to be able to think independently and systemically in relation to scholarly activity, in the workplace, and in the world. We want them to have a level of scientific and information technology literacy.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Demonstration of independent critical research analysis leading to the communication of an essay-based argument
  • Ability to work contextually between genres, eras and media (eg. from printed to cinematic to online texts and interactive formats)
  • Ability to take the insights and skills of this unit into further learning and to encourage the learning of others

Assessment tasks

  • Participation
  • Quiz
  • AustLit Article Analysis
  • Research Essay

Problem Solving and Research Capability

Our graduates should be capable of researching; of analysing, and interpreting and assessing data and information in various forms; of drawing connections across fields of knowledge; and they should be able to relate their knowledge to complex situations at work or in the world, in order to diagnose and solve problems. We want them to have the confidence to take the initiative in doing so, within an awareness of their own limitations.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Demonstration of independent critical research analysis leading to the communication of an essay-based argument
  • Ability to work contextually between genres, eras and media (eg. from printed to cinematic to online texts and interactive formats)
  • Professionalism in terms of punctuality, required levels of tutorial and online participation, task management, team-based communication and presentation of work
  • Ability to take the insights and skills of this unit into further learning and to encourage the learning of others

Assessment tasks

  • Participation
  • Quiz
  • AustLit Article Analysis
  • Research Essay

Creative and Innovative

Our graduates will also be capable of creative thinking and of creating knowledge. They will be imaginative and open to experience and capable of innovation at work and in the community. We want them to be engaged in applying their critical, creative thinking.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Demonstration of independent critical research analysis leading to the communication of an essay-based argument
  • Ability to work contextually between genres, eras and media (eg. from printed to cinematic to online texts and interactive formats)
  • Professionalism in terms of punctuality, required levels of tutorial and online participation, task management, team-based communication and presentation of work
  • Ability to take the insights and skills of this unit into further learning and to encourage the learning of others

Assessment tasks

  • Participation
  • Quiz
  • AustLit Article Analysis
  • Research Essay

Effective Communication

We want to develop in our students the ability to communicate and convey their views in forms effective with different audiences. We want our graduates to take with them the capability to read, listen, question, gather and evaluate information resources in a variety of formats, assess, write clearly, speak effectively, and to use visual communication and communication technologies as appropriate.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Demonstration of independent critical research analysis leading to the communication of an essay-based argument
  • Ability to work contextually between genres, eras and media (eg. from printed to cinematic to online texts and interactive formats)
  • Ability to apply literary insights into broader social and environmental contexts
  • Professionalism in terms of punctuality, required levels of tutorial and online participation, task management, team-based communication and presentation of work

Assessment tasks

  • Participation
  • Quiz
  • AustLit Article Analysis
  • Research Essay

Engaged and Ethical Local and Global citizens

As local citizens our graduates will be aware of indigenous perspectives and of the nation's historical context. They will be engaged with the challenges of contemporary society and with knowledge and ideas. We want our graduates to have respect for diversity, to be open-minded, sensitive to others and inclusive, and to be open to other cultures and perspectives: they should have a level of cultural literacy. Our graduates should be aware of disadvantage and social justice, and be willing to participate to help create a wiser and better society.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Demonstration of independent critical research analysis leading to the communication of an essay-based argument
  • Ability to apply literary insights into broader social and environmental contexts
  • Professionalism in terms of punctuality, required levels of tutorial and online participation, task management, team-based communication and presentation of work
  • Ability to take the insights and skills of this unit into further learning and to encourage the learning of others

Assessment tasks

  • Participation
  • Quiz
  • AustLit Article Analysis
  • Research Essay

Capable of Professional and Personal Judgement and Initiative

We want our graduates to have emotional intelligence and sound interpersonal skills and to demonstrate discernment and common sense in their professional and personal judgement. They will exercise initiative as needed. They will be capable of risk assessment, and be able to handle ambiguity and complexity, enabling them to be adaptable in diverse and changing environments.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Ability to apply literary insights into broader social and environmental contexts
  • Professionalism in terms of punctuality, required levels of tutorial and online participation, task management, team-based communication and presentation of work
  • Ability to take the insights and skills of this unit into further learning and to encourage the learning of others

Assessment tasks

  • Participation
  • Quiz
  • AustLit Article Analysis
  • Research Essay

Commitment to Continuous Learning

Our graduates will have enquiring minds and a literate curiosity which will lead them to pursue knowledge for its own sake. They will continue to pursue learning in their careers and as they participate in the world. They will be capable of reflecting on their experiences and relationships with others and the environment, learning from them, and growing - personally, professionally and socially.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Ability to apply literary insights into broader social and environmental contexts
  • Professionalism in terms of punctuality, required levels of tutorial and online participation, task management, team-based communication and presentation of work
  • Ability to take the insights and skills of this unit into further learning and to encourage the learning of others

Assessment tasks

  • Participation
  • Quiz
  • AustLit Article Analysis
  • Research Essay

Discipline Specific Knowledge and Skills

Our graduates will take with them the intellectual development, depth and breadth of knowledge, scholarly understanding, and specific subject content in their chosen fields to make them competent and confident in their subject or profession. They will be able to demonstrate, where relevant, professional technical competence and meet professional standards. They will be able to articulate the structure of knowledge of their discipline, be able to adapt discipline-specific knowledge to novel situations, and be able to contribute from their discipline to inter-disciplinary solutions to problems.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Ability to apply literary insights into broader social and environmental contexts
  • Ability to take the insights and skills of this unit into further learning and to encourage the learning of others

Assessment tasks

  • Participation
  • Quiz
  • AustLit Article Analysis
  • Research Essay

Changes from Previous Offering

In 2016, the Pen Macquarie Anthology of Australian Literature was introduced as the key text, replacing a larger, more expensive text list, in order to provide all students with a broad and historically-situated understanding of key figures and themes in Australian literature from the early 19th century, through the vital post-WWII era to the present, regardless of prior educational experience.

 

The unit aims to accommodate for students who have never studied Australian literature before, while 'filling in the gaps' for students who already are familiar with certain authors or eras. By the end of this unit, all students should be able to discuss and further explore Australia literature in an informed and confident manner, with knowledge of contemporary scholarly debates.      

 

Grading Policy, Referencing, Essay Criteria

 

  University policy on grading

 

University Grading Policy

http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/grading/policy.html

 

The grade a student receives will signify their overall performance in meeting the learning outcomes of a unit of study. Grades will not be awarded by reference to the achievement of other students nor allocated to fit a predetermined distribution. In determining a grade, due weight will be given to the learning outcomes and level of a unit (ie 100, 200, 300, 800 etc). Graded units will use the following grades:

 

HD

High Distinction

85-100

D

Distinction

75-84

Cr

Credit

65-74

P

Pass

50-64

F

Fail

0-49

 

 

  REFERENCING

 

Department Guide to Essay Writing and Referencing

An updated English Department guide can be found at:

 

http://www.engl.mq.edu.au/pdfs/Essay_Style_full_version.pdf

 

The library’s guide can be found by clicking ‘undergraduate’ on the main catalogue page or using this link:

 

http://www.lib.mq.edu.au/research/referencing.html

 

MLA Style is the recommended English referencing format.

 

 

 

  GRADE DESCRIPTORS

These are not used formulaically to calculate your mark, but to provide detailed feedback as to where you need to work on your essay writing.

 

 

Criterion

High Distinction

Distinction

Credit

Pass

Fail

Relationship to topic or task

Highly sophisticated demonstrated understanding of the task; sophisticated knowledge of implicit or embedded aspects.

Superior demonstrated understanding of the task; superior knowledge of implicit or embedded aspects.

Good demonstrated understanding of the task; some knowledge of implicit or embedded aspects.

Adequate demonstrated understanding of the task. Some understanding of relevant concepts but these not effectively incorporated

Does not demonstrate understanding of the task, or misinterprets what is being asked.

Knowledge of literary/ critical concepts

Superior demonstrated understanding of critical concepts and how these can be applied to texts.

Good demonstrated understanding of critical concepts and how these can be applied to texts.

Fair demonstrated understanding of critical concepts and application to texts (learning above replication of lectures).

Adequate demonstrated understanding of critical concepts and how these can be applied to texts (relevant concepts can be applied to texts in a basic manner).

Does not demonstrate understanding of critical concepts and how these can be applied to texts.

Development of independent critical argument

Substantial originality and insight in identifying, generating and communicating a convincing critical argument.

Some originality and insight in identifying, generating and communicating a coherent critical argument.

Generates an adequate, critical argument that is supported by primary and secondary evidence.

Some or only minimal evidence of critical argument – but this argument is simplistic and underdeveloped.

Does not construct a coherent critical argument.

Analysis of narrative strategies / literary technique/ theories (rather than paraphrasing plot)

Highly sophisticated and original analysis of narrative strategies/literary technique/theories

Superior analysis of narrative strategies/literary technique/theories.

Some analysis of narrative strategies/literary techniques/theories but still reliant on plot/story elements for argument.

Heavy reliance on plot/story elements for argument.

Failure to analyse narrative strategies/literary technique/theories. Total reliance on plot/story.

Appropriate use of technical terms

Highly sophisticated use of technical terms.

Superior use of technical terms.

Appropriate use of technical terms.

Some technical terms used correctly.

Technical terms omitted or used incorrectly.

Selection and analysis of examples from text(s)

Highly sophisticated and original analysis of texts.

Superior analysis of texts: analysis moves beyond the obvious towards nuanced or original insights.

Some close analysis of texts, but too reliant on plot/story elements for argument.

Reliance on plot/story elements for argument.

Failure to analyse texts effectively.

Evidence of secondary research

Sophisticated use of research to support ideas. Highly effective integration of ideas within published research.

Ideas well integrated into and supported by published research.

Evidence of research, which has been used to support ideas.

Uses the appropriate number of secondary sources but these fail to support the essay’s ideas in an effective manner.

Lack of appropriate research.

Presentation (language and

expression)

Highly accurate grammar. Highly sophisticated and effective expression that is appropriate to the task.

Spelling, grammar and punctuation of a high standard. Superior expression.

Good expression. Some  improvement needed in expression of ideas and articulation of argument.

Adequate use of language. Numerous mistakes in expression or grammar.

Sub-standard

expression or grammar and/or awkward expression.

Referencing and Works Cited

Consistent, highly accurate use and detail of appropriate scholarly sources.

Strong use and detail of appropriate scholarly sources.

Generally accurate use and detail of appropriate sources.

Inaccurate, inconsistent or inappropriate use/detail of sources.

Referencing and Works Cited not  of tertiary standard.