Logo Students

PHIX383 – Philosophy Capstone Unit

2017 – S2 OUA

General Information

Pdf icon Download as PDF
Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff Convenor and Tutor
Jennifer Duke-Yonge
Contact via jennifer.duke-yonge@mq.edu.au, +61 2 9850 8826, or via 'Dialogues' in iLearn
By arrangement
Prerequisites Prerequisites
Corequisites Corequisites
Co-badged status Co-badged status
Unit description Unit description
This unit provides students with the opportunity to integrate knowledge acquired in their study of philosophy, to reflect on the development of their skills, and to focus on how their study of philosophy equips them for the next step in their careers. We review the philosophy graduate attributes: the knowledge, skills, methods and values developed in the course of the philosophy degree. With a focus on what these skills and values mean in practice, we examine a range of texts that both illustrate the diversity of philosophical approaches and represent the 'state of the art' in the field. By applying critical thinking, problem-solving, and creative skills to these texts, as well as philosophical values of intellectual humility and openness to the force of the better argument, students will learn what it is like to engage in live philosophical debate. We also look at the values cultivated through the study of philosophy and we consider how the skills and values acquired through the degree can be taken forward into further study, work, and applied in other areas of life. All enrolment queries should be directed to Open Universities Australia (OUA): see www.open.edu.au

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at https://www.open.edu.au/student-admin-and-support/key-dates/

Learning Outcomes

  1. Identification of the distinctive attributes acquired and developed in the course of the philosophy degree.
  2. Understanding of the diversity of philosophical approaches and traditions as exemplified in the different approaches and methods for doing and writing philosophy.
  3. Enhanced reasoning and critical thinking skills.
  4. Enhanced imaginative, creative and reflective abilities.
  5. Enhanced ability to demonstrate precision of thought and expression in the analysis and formulation of complex and controversial problems, verbally and in writing.
  6. Applied understanding of the philosophical values of intellectual openness, humility, and honesty in recognising the force of conclusions reached by a careful assessment of arguments.

General Assessment Information

Written assignments are to be submitted through Turnitin, and will be marked and returned via Grademark. For information about these tools, see:

http://www.mq.edu.au/iLearn/student_info/assignments.htm

There is no need for a coversheet - the iLearn assignment submission (Turnitin) involves declaring your details and honesty in submitting your work. Please note, we do not accept submission by email attachment.

See the "Policies and Procedures" section below for more detail about relevant policies.

 

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Hurdle Due
Text analyses 30% Midnight, Sundays Wks 5, 8, 11
Reflective Portfolio Blog 20% Ongoing, due Sunday Wk 12
Participation 10% Ongoing
Essay 40% Midnight, Sunday Wk 13

Text analyses

Due: Midnight, Sundays Wks 5, 8, 11
Weighting: 30%

The text analyses are a series of short (500 word) writing exercises. There are three text analyses due throughout the Study Period. Each text analysis covers one of the three sections of the unit and is worth 10 marks each. Together, the text analyses are worth 30 marks.

This task will be assessed by the following criteria: content, structure, critical analysis and written expression. A detailed rubric for this task will be supplied on iLearn.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Identification of the distinctive attributes acquired and developed in the course of the philosophy degree.
  • Understanding of the diversity of philosophical approaches and traditions as exemplified in the different approaches and methods for doing and writing philosophy.
  • Enhanced reasoning and critical thinking skills.
  • Enhanced imaginative, creative and reflective abilities.
  • Enhanced ability to demonstrate precision of thought and expression in the analysis and formulation of complex and controversial problems, verbally and in writing.

Reflective Portfolio Blog

Due: Ongoing, due Sunday Wk 12
Weighting: 20%

The reflective portfolio blog is designed to encourage you to reflect each week on

1.     the knowledge acquired through the study of philosophy,

2.     skills developed through the program of study,

3.     philosophical values, and

4.     different philosophical approaches and methodologies.

You are expected to make at least one entry in your reflective portfolio blog for each week of content in a timely fashion (by the end of the next week). Your entry or entries should include, but are not limited to, creative and critical personal reflections on the unit content of that week, as well as broader reflections on philosophy and philosophical methodologies. All blog entries up to the due date will together constitute the reflective portfolio and will receive an overall grade out of 20. Your blog posts can only be seen by you and the unit convenor/tutor.

This task will be assessed using the following criteria: content, structure, creativity, reflective insights, critical analysis and written expression. A detailed rubric for this task will be supplied on iLearn.

You will be assessed on blog posts covering weeks 2-11, and the blog must be finalised by Sunday of week 12.

 

Submission: blog through iLearn. For information on how to blog in iLearn see: http://mq.edu.au/iLearn/student_info/activities.htm#blog 


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Identification of the distinctive attributes acquired and developed in the course of the philosophy degree.
  • Understanding of the diversity of philosophical approaches and traditions as exemplified in the different approaches and methods for doing and writing philosophy.
  • Enhanced reasoning and critical thinking skills.
  • Enhanced imaginative, creative and reflective abilities.
  • Enhanced ability to demonstrate precision of thought and expression in the analysis and formulation of complex and controversial problems, verbally and in writing.
  • Applied understanding of the philosophical values of intellectual openness, humility, and honesty in recognising the force of conclusions reached by a careful assessment of arguments.

Participation

Due: Ongoing
Weighting: 10%

Discussion is a vital part of learning in philosophy. Students will discuss unit material via the discussion forum.

This task will be assessed by the following criteria: quality of your posts and their timeliness (you should post within a week of the topic). Quality is not just measured by the philosophical content of your posts, but by your willingness to engage in discussion with your peers.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Understanding of the diversity of philosophical approaches and traditions as exemplified in the different approaches and methods for doing and writing philosophy.
  • Enhanced reasoning and critical thinking skills.
  • Enhanced imaginative, creative and reflective abilities.
  • Enhanced ability to demonstrate precision of thought and expression in the analysis and formulation of complex and controversial problems, verbally and in writing.
  • Applied understanding of the philosophical values of intellectual openness, humility, and honesty in recognising the force of conclusions reached by a careful assessment of arguments.

Essay

Due: Midnight, Sunday Wk 13
Weighting: 40%

The essay (2500 words) is designed to extend your understanding of a specific topic or issue and to test your ability to engage with that topic in depth. Essay writing tests your ability to synthesise material from a range of readings and to express, analyse and structure key ideas and arguments clearly, logically and systematically. It also tests your ability to develop your own view, and to argue for that view in a cogent and sustained way. You will be expected to undertake research beyond the required readings and to incorporate that further research into your essay.

This task will be assessed by the following criteria: content, structure, argument and critical analysis, written expression and referencing. A detailed rubric for this task will be supplied on iLearn.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Understanding of the diversity of philosophical approaches and traditions as exemplified in the different approaches and methods for doing and writing philosophy.
  • Enhanced reasoning and critical thinking skills.
  • Enhanced imaginative, creative and reflective abilities.
  • Enhanced ability to demonstrate precision of thought and expression in the analysis and formulation of complex and controversial problems, verbally and in writing.
  • Applied understanding of the philosophical values of intellectual openness, humility, and honesty in recognising the force of conclusions reached by a careful assessment of arguments.

Delivery and Resources

 

REQUIRED AND RECOMMENDED TEXTS AND/OR MATERIALS

All the weekly readings for the unit will be made available through iLearn.

Additional readings will be suggested in iLearn.

TECHNOLOGY USED AND REQUIRED

Online units can be accessed at: http://ilearn.mq.edu.au

The unit uses the following technology: iLearn

 

Unit Schedule

Important schedule information: Please note that OUA units offered by Macquarie University now follow Macquarie Sessions rather than OUA Study Periods. This will include a mid-session break of two weeks. You will find the Session dates here:

https://www.open.edu.au/student-admin-and-support/key-dates-2017/

 

Week 1

 

 Introduction: What is a Capstone Unit?

·         What is a capstone unit?

·         An overview of the 3 streams in the Department of Philosophy at Macquarie University  – Mind, Metaphysics and Meaning; Social Philosophy and Continental Philosophy; Ethics and Applied Ethics.

·         Our focus in this unit is on the methodologies and philosophical self-understandings across these three streams. How is philosophy done? What is the culture of philosophy?

·         Unit outline.       

 

·         Required Reading:

o    No reading

 

·         Further Reading:

o    Janice Moulton, 'A Paradigm of Philosophy: The Adversary Method', in S. Harding and M. Hintikka (eds) Discovering Reality (Dordrecht: Reidel, 1983), pp. 149-164.

o    Sally Haslanger, ‘Changing the Ideology and Culture of Philosophy: Not by Reason (Alone), Hypatia, 23(2), 2008: 210-223.

Week 2

 

     The Analytical vs. Continental divide.

·         Much of contemporary philosophy is determined by the analytical vs. continental divide. What is this divide? What is the history of the divide?

·         What are the ‘essentialist’ and ‘deflationary’ responses to the divide?

·         What is the on-going relevance of the divide today and into the future?

 

·         Required Reading and Listening:

o    Jack Reynolds, James Chase, James Williams and Edwin Mares, “Introduction: Postanalytic and Metacontinental Philosophy”, Postanalytic and Metacontinental Philosophy: Crossing Philosophical Divides, ed. James William et. al., Continumm: London, 2010, pp. 1-4.

o    ‘In our time’ with Melvyn Bragg, ‘Podcast, Analytic-Continental Philosophy Split’, 10 Nov 11, with Stephen Mulhall of New College, Beatrice Han-Pile, Hans Johann-Glock. Available from: http://www.bbc.co.uk/podcasts/series/iot/all

 

·         Further Reading

o    Peter Simons (2001): Whose Fault? The Origins and Inevitability of the Analytic–Continental Rift, International Journal of Philosophical Studies, 9:3, 295-311.

o    Postanalytic and Metacontinental Philosophy: Crossing Philosophical Divides, ed. James William et. al., Continumm: London, 2010, pp. 1-4.

o    James Chase and Jack Reynolds, Analytic versus Continental, Acumen: Durham, 2011.

Week 3

 

 Ethics And Applied Ethics Stream

 Methods in Moral Philosophy: The Case of Evil

·         What methods are used in contemporary moral philosophy?

·         This question will be explored through the prism of a particular topic: moral evil. How do we develop and test a moral theory, such as a thoery of evil?

 

·         Required Reading:

o    Paul Formosa, ‘Evils, Wrongs and Dignity: How to Test a Theory of Evil’, Journal of Value Inquiry, 2013, DOI: 10.1007/s10790-013-9380-2.

 ·         Further Reading:

o    Dews, Peter. The Idea of Evil. Oxford: Blackwell, 2008.

o    Formosa, Paul. "A Conception of Evil." Journal of Value Inquiry 42, no. 2 (2008): 217-239.

o    Morton, Adam. On Evil. New York: Routledge, 2004.

o    Russell, Luke. "Evil Revivalism Versus Evil-Skepticism." Journal of Value Inquiry 40 (2006): 89-105.

o    Scanlon, T.M., 2002, ‘Rawls on Justification’, in The Cambridge Companion to Rawls, S. Freeman (ed.), Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 139–167.

Week 4

 

 Ethics and Cognitive Science.

·         What is the relationship between ethics and science? In particular, how do findings in cognitive science and social psychology impact on our ethical theorising? What are some of the problems that can arise when we try to draw ethical conclusions from scientific findings?

 

·         Required Reading:

o    Joshua D. Greene, The Secret Joke of Kant’s Soul, pp. 35 – 80, in Moral Psychology, Volume 3: The Neuroscience of Morality, ed. Walter Sinnott-Armstrong (Cambridge: MIT Press, 2008).

 

·         Further Reading

o    John Mikhail, Moral Cognition and Computational Theory; Mark Timmons, Toward a Sentimentalist Deontology; Joshua D. Greene, Reply to Mikhail and Timmons; and the other papers in Moral Psychology Volume 3: The Neuroscience of Morality: Emotion, Brain Disorders, and Development, edited by Walter Sinnott-Armstrong, 35-80. Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press, 2008.

o    L. May, Michael Friedman & A. Clark (eds.) (1996). Mind and Morals: Essays on Ethics and Cognitive Science. MIT Press.

o    The Emotional Dog and Its Rational Tail: A Social Intuitionist Approach to Moral Judgment, Jonathan Haidt Psychological Review, 2001. Vol. 108. No. 4, 814-83.4

o    Jeanette Kennett, Do psychopaths really threaten moral rationalism? Philosophical Explorations (2006) Vol. 9, 69-82.

Week 5

 

Methods in Political Philosophy: Ideal Theory

·         What methods are used in contemporary political philosophy?

·         How does the method of transcendental institutionalism compare with realization focused comparison?

 

·         Required Reading:

o    Amartya Sen, ‘Introduction’ in The Idea of Justice, Harvard University Press: Cambridge, 2009.

 

·         Further Reading

o    Rawls, John. Political Liberalism. New York: Columbia University Press, 1993.

o   Rawls, John. A Theory of Justice. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 1971.

o    G.A. Cohen, On the Currency of Egalitarian Justice, and Other Essays in Political Philosophy, Michael Otsuka (ed.), Princeton University Press, 2011.

Week 6

 

Social Philosophy and Continental Philosophy Stream

  

 Classical German Philosophy and Its Contemporary Significance 

 

·         What is the contemporary relevance of classical German philosophy and of Hegel in particular? How does philosophy’s history impact on its present form?

 

·         Required Reading:

o    Robert Pippin, "Hegel's Ethical Rationalism", from his Idealism as Modernism, pp. 417-450, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1997.

 

·         Further Reading

o   Hegel, Elements of the Philosophy of Right, ##142-157, trans. H. B. Nisbet, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1991, pp. 189-198.

o   Allen Wood, Hegel's Ethical Thought, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1990, pp. 195-209.

 

Week 7

 

Contemporary Critical Theory 

 

·         What is contemporary critical theory and what methods does it employ? The place of philosophy in the society and politics of its time. Does philosophy's place in its society and time impact on its methods?

 

·         Required Reading:

o    Jürgen Habermas, "The relationship between Theory and Practice Revisited", in Truth and Justification, trans. B. Fultner, MIT Press, 2003, pp. 277-292.

 

·         Further Reading

o    Max Horkeimer, "Traditional and Critical Theory", in Critical Theory. Selected Essays, NY, Continuum, 2002, pp. 188-243.

 

Week 8

 

 

 Analytical and Continental Aesthetics 

·         How do the analytic and continental philosophical traditions approach aesthetics? What are the differences and similarities in terms of methods?

 

·         Required Reading

o    Jacques Rancière, 'The Aesthetic Dimension: Aesthetics, Politics, Knowledge', Critical Inquiry, 36(1), 2009. 

o    Noel Carroll, 'Moderate Moralism', in Beyond Aesthetics: Philosophical Essays (Cambridge University Press, 2001), pp. 293-316.

 

·         Further Reading

o    Jacques Ranciere, 'The Intolerable Image', Chapter Four of his The Emancipated Spectator, trans. Gregory Elliot (London/New York: Verso, 2009), 83-105.

o    Jean-Philippe Deranty, 'Regimes of the Arts' in J-P. Deranty (ed.) Jacques Ranciere: Key Concepts (Durham: Continuum, 2010), 116-130.

o    Susan L. Feagin, 'Film Appreciation and Moral Insensitivity', Midwestern Studies in Philosophy XXXIV (2010: 20-33).

 

 

Week 9

 

 Mind, Metaphysics and Meaning Stream

 

 Conceptual Analysis and philosophical method

·         What is conceptual analysis and what roles does it play in analytic philosophical methodology?

·         What are some of the problems and limitations of this approach? What are some of the advantages?

 

·         Required Reading:

o    Chris Daly, An introduction to philosophical method, Broadview Press 2010.

·         Further Reading:

o    Laura Schroeter (2004). The Limits of Conceptual Analysis. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 85 (4):425-453.score: 90.0

o  Frank Jackson, ‘The Role of Conceptual Analysis’, in From Metaphysics to Ethics, Clarendon: Oxford, 1998.

o    Stephen Laurence & Eric Margolis (2003). Concepts and Conceptual Analysis. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 67 (2):253-282.

o    David Plunkett (2011). Expressivism, Representation, and the Nature of Conceptual Analysis. Philosophical Studies 156 (1):15-31.

Week 10

 

    Science, Naturalism and Philosophy

·         What is the relationship between philosophy and science? What is naturalism? How does naturalism impact on how we understand philosophy’s methods?

 

·         Required Reading:

o    David Macarthur and Mario De Caro, ‘Introduction - the Nature of Naturalism,’ in Naturalism in Question, eds. De Caro, M. and Macarthur, D, Cambridge, Mass: Harvard University Press, 2004.

 

·         Further Reading:

o    Robert Audi (2000). Philosophical Naturalism at the Turn of the Century. Journal of Philosophical Research 25:27-45.

o    Mario de Caro & David Macarthur (eds.), Naturalism and Normativity. Columbia University Press. 2010.

o    John R. Shook & Paul Kurtz (eds.), The Future of Naturalism. Humanity Books. 2009.

o    Penelope Maddy (2001). Naturalism: Friends and Foes. Noûs 35 (s15):37-67.

Week 11

 

    Experimental Philosophy

·         What is experimental philosophy? What are the aims and methods of experimental philosophy? What is the philosophical significance of experimental philosophy?

 

·         Required Reading:

o    Joshua Knobe, ‘Experimental Philosophy’, Philosophy Compass 2/1 (2007): 81–92.

 

·         Further Reading:

o    Robert L. Woolfolk (2013). Experimental Philosophy: A Methodological Critique. Metaphilosophy 44 (1-2):79-87.

o    Joshua Knobe & Shaun Nichols (eds.) (2008). Experimental Philosophy. Oxford University Press.

o    Paul E. Griffiths & Karola Stotz (2008). Experimental Philosophy of Science. Philosophy Compass 3 (3):507–521.

o    Joshua Alexander (2010). Is Experimental Philosophy Philosophically Significant? Philosophical Psychology 23 (3):377-389.

 

Week 12

 

 A Philosophical Education – Conclusion.

·         What is the value and purpose of a philosophical education? What is the value and use of different philosophical methods? What is the role of philosophy in academia, the university and society more generally?

·         What use can be made of a philosophical education? E.g. Masters of Resarch (MRes), PhDs, other career options, etc.

 

·         RequiredReading:

o    No reading.

Policies and Procedures

Late Submission

Unless otherwise stated, late submission of written work will result in a deduction of 10% of the mark awarded for each week or part of a week beyond the due date, or date to which an extension has been granted.

Extension Request

Disruption to Studies Procedure (http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/disruption_studies/procedure.html)

The University recognises that students may experience disruptions that adversely affect their academic performance in assessment activities.

The disruption to studies policy (http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/disruption_studies/policy.html) applies only to serious and unavoidable disruptions that arise after a study period has commenced.

Serious and unavoidable disruption

The University classifies a disruption as serious and unavoidable if it:

  • could not have reasonably been anticipated, avoided or guarded against by the student; and
  • was beyond the student's control; and
  • caused substantial disruption to the student's capacity for effective study and/or completion of required work; and
  • occurred during an event critical study period and was at least three (3) consecutive days duration, and/or
  • prevented completion of a final examination.

If you feel that you've been impacted by a serious and unavoidable disruption to study situation, submit an application as follows:

  1. Visit Ask MQ (https://ask.mq.edu.au) and use your OneID to log in via 'Current student domestic and international'
  2. Under 'Forms' select 'disruptions' and fill in your relevant details.
  3. Attach supporting documents by clicking 'Add a reply', click 'browse' and navigating to the files you want to attach, then click 'submit form' to send your notification and supporting documents
  4. Please keep copies of your original documents, as they may be requested in the future as part of the assessment process

Review

Once your submission is assessed, recommendations are sent to your unit convenor to ensure an appropriate solution for affected assessment(s) is organised.

OUA Specific Policies and Procedures

OUA Special Circumstances Process

Special Circumstances refers to late withdrawal from a unit and your request to have your circumstances taken into account for a possible refund of fees and removal of a "fail" result.

Applications for Special Circumstances are to be submitted to Open Universities Australia directly:

https://www.open.edu.au/public/student-admin-and-support/student-support-services/special-circumstances

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central. Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Academic Honesty Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/academic_honesty/policy.html

Assessment Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/assessment/policy_2016.html

Grade Appeal Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/gradeappeal/policy.html

Complaint Management Procedure for Students and Members of the Public http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/complaint_management/procedure.html​

Disruption to Studies Policy (in effect until Dec 4th, 2017): http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/disruption_studies/policy.html

Special Consideration Policy (in effect from Dec 4th, 2017): https://staff.mq.edu.au/work/strategy-planning-and-governance/university-policies-and-procedures/policies/special-consideration

In addition, a number of other policies can be found in the Learning and Teaching Category of Policy Central.

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/support/student_conduct/

Results

Results shown in iLearn, or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent. For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au.

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Learning Skills

Learning Skills (mq.edu.au/learningskills) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to improve your marks and take control of your study.

Student Enquiry Service

For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at ask.mq.edu.au

Equity Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

IT Help

For help with University computer systems and technology, visit http://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/information_technology/help/

When using the University's IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use of IT Resources Policy. The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network including students.

Graduate Capabilities

Problem Solving and Research Capability

Our graduates should be capable of researching; of analysing, and interpreting and assessing data and information in various forms; of drawing connections across fields of knowledge; and they should be able to relate their knowledge to complex situations at work or in the world, in order to diagnose and solve problems. We want them to have the confidence to take the initiative in doing so, within an awareness of their own limitations.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Understanding of the diversity of philosophical approaches and traditions as exemplified in the different approaches and methods for doing and writing philosophy.
  • Enhanced ability to demonstrate precision of thought and expression in the analysis and formulation of complex and controversial problems, verbally and in writing.

Assessment tasks

  • Text analyses
  • Reflective Portfolio Blog
  • Participation
  • Essay

Creative and Innovative

Our graduates will also be capable of creative thinking and of creating knowledge. They will be imaginative and open to experience and capable of innovation at work and in the community. We want them to be engaged in applying their critical, creative thinking.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Identification of the distinctive attributes acquired and developed in the course of the philosophy degree.
  • Enhanced imaginative, creative and reflective abilities.

Assessment tasks

  • Text analyses
  • Reflective Portfolio Blog
  • Participation
  • Essay

Effective Communication

We want to develop in our students the ability to communicate and convey their views in forms effective with different audiences. We want our graduates to take with them the capability to read, listen, question, gather and evaluate information resources in a variety of formats, assess, write clearly, speak effectively, and to use visual communication and communication technologies as appropriate.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Enhanced ability to demonstrate precision of thought and expression in the analysis and formulation of complex and controversial problems, verbally and in writing.
  • Applied understanding of the philosophical values of intellectual openness, humility, and honesty in recognising the force of conclusions reached by a careful assessment of arguments.

Assessment tasks

  • Text analyses
  • Reflective Portfolio Blog
  • Participation
  • Essay

Engaged and Ethical Local and Global citizens

As local citizens our graduates will be aware of indigenous perspectives and of the nation's historical context. They will be engaged with the challenges of contemporary society and with knowledge and ideas. We want our graduates to have respect for diversity, to be open-minded, sensitive to others and inclusive, and to be open to other cultures and perspectives: they should have a level of cultural literacy. Our graduates should be aware of disadvantage and social justice, and be willing to participate to help create a wiser and better society.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • Applied understanding of the philosophical values of intellectual openness, humility, and honesty in recognising the force of conclusions reached by a careful assessment of arguments.

Assessment tasks

  • Text analyses
  • Reflective Portfolio Blog

Commitment to Continuous Learning

Our graduates will have enquiring minds and a literate curiosity which will lead them to pursue knowledge for its own sake. They will continue to pursue learning in their careers and as they participate in the world. They will be capable of reflecting on their experiences and relationships with others and the environment, learning from them, and growing - personally, professionally and socially.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Identification of the distinctive attributes acquired and developed in the course of the philosophy degree.
  • Enhanced ability to demonstrate precision of thought and expression in the analysis and formulation of complex and controversial problems, verbally and in writing.

Assessment tasks

  • Text analyses
  • Reflective Portfolio Blog
  • Participation
  • Essay

Capable of Professional and Personal Judgement and Initiative

We want our graduates to have emotional intelligence and sound interpersonal skills and to demonstrate discernment and common sense in their professional and personal judgement. They will exercise initiative as needed. They will be capable of risk assessment, and be able to handle ambiguity and complexity, enabling them to be adaptable in diverse and changing environments.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Enhanced ability to demonstrate precision of thought and expression in the analysis and formulation of complex and controversial problems, verbally and in writing.
  • Applied understanding of the philosophical values of intellectual openness, humility, and honesty in recognising the force of conclusions reached by a careful assessment of arguments.

Assessment tasks

  • Text analyses
  • Reflective Portfolio Blog
  • Participation
  • Essay

Discipline Specific Knowledge and Skills

Our graduates will take with them the intellectual development, depth and breadth of knowledge, scholarly understanding, and specific subject content in their chosen fields to make them competent and confident in their subject or profession. They will be able to demonstrate, where relevant, professional technical competence and meet professional standards. They will be able to articulate the structure of knowledge of their discipline, be able to adapt discipline-specific knowledge to novel situations, and be able to contribute from their discipline to inter-disciplinary solutions to problems.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Identification of the distinctive attributes acquired and developed in the course of the philosophy degree.
  • Understanding of the diversity of philosophical approaches and traditions as exemplified in the different approaches and methods for doing and writing philosophy.
  • Applied understanding of the philosophical values of intellectual openness, humility, and honesty in recognising the force of conclusions reached by a careful assessment of arguments.

Assessment tasks

  • Text analyses
  • Reflective Portfolio Blog
  • Participation
  • Essay

Critical, Analytical and Integrative Thinking

We want our graduates to be capable of reasoning, questioning and analysing, and to integrate and synthesise learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments; to be able to critique constraints, assumptions and limitations; to be able to think independently and systemically in relation to scholarly activity, in the workplace, and in the world. We want them to have a level of scientific and information technology literacy.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Identification of the distinctive attributes acquired and developed in the course of the philosophy degree.
  • Understanding of the diversity of philosophical approaches and traditions as exemplified in the different approaches and methods for doing and writing philosophy.
  • Enhanced reasoning and critical thinking skills.
  • Enhanced ability to demonstrate precision of thought and expression in the analysis and formulation of complex and controversial problems, verbally and in writing.
  • Applied understanding of the philosophical values of intellectual openness, humility, and honesty in recognising the force of conclusions reached by a careful assessment of arguments.

Assessment tasks

  • Text analyses
  • Reflective Portfolio Blog
  • Participation
  • Essay