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ANTX207 – Psychological Anthropology

2017 – S2 OUA

General Information

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Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff
Timothy Lynch
Prerequisites Prerequisites
Corequisites Corequisites
Co-badged status Co-badged status
Unit description Unit description
This unit introduces psychological anthropology, including emotional, cognitive, developmental, and perceptual dynamics across cultures. Psychological anthropology studies the relation between individual psychology and sociocultural diversity, for example, between psychopathology and social structure, between personality differences and childrearing practices, or between perceptual experience and a society's ideologies about the senses. A wide range of perspectives will be explored, from evolutionary psychology to neuroanthropology, and address such topics as consciousness including spirit possession, and cultural variation in insanity and impairment. All enrolment queries should be directed to Open Universities Australia (OUA): see www.open.edu.au

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at https://www.open.edu.au/student-admin-and-support/key-dates/

Learning Outcomes

  1. Discover the variety of humanity, including the peculiarity of Western traits, ways we understand ourselves, and social roles.
  2. Interrogate ‘human nature’ to better understand the relationship between universal traits and variability.
  3. Explore the role of social setting and norms in shaping human development.
  4. Actively participate in discussion of psychological anthropology (such as gender roles, emotional variation, sex and gender across cultures, and childrearing)
  5. Gain greater understanding of techniques for investigating experience, including ethnography, field research, and comparative approaches.
  6. Investigate in greater depth one area of special interest in the study of human diversity.
  7. Improve writing, communication and critical reading skills.

General Assessment Information

This unit uses Turnitin for the essay and exam.

Unless otherwise stated in your iLearn unit, late submission of written work will result in a deduction of 10% of the mark awarded for each week or part of a week beyond the due date, or date to which an extension has been granted.

Extensions The granting of extensions of up to one week are at the discretion of the unit convener.  Any requests for extensions must be made in writing before the due date for the submission of the assessment task.  Extensions beyond one week is subject to the university’s Disruptions Policy (Read the policy http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/disruption_studies/policy.html). Disruption to Studies If you require an extension of longer than seven (7) days you will be required to submit a ‘Disruption to Studies’ Notification.  Please follow the procedure below: Visit https://ask.mq.edu.au/account/forms/display/disruptions and use your OneID to log in. Select your OUA unit code from the drop down list and fill in your relevant details. Note: A notification needs to be submitted for each unit you believe is affected by the disruption. Click "Submit form". Attach supporting documents by clicking 'Add a note/attachment', click 'browse' and navigating to the files you want to attach, then click 'submit note' to send your notification and supporting documents Please keep copies of your original documents, as they may be requested in the future as part of the assessment process Please ensure that supporting documentation is included with your request. Notify your lecturer via your iLearn dialogue box if you are submitting a ‘Disruption to Studies’ Notification. Your request will be considered once all the documentation has been received. If you have issues, please contact your convenor via the dialogue tool immediately. Extensions are granted only on grounds of illness or misadventure, and appropriate supporting documentation must be submitted. Work submitted after 3 weeks beyond the due date, or the date after which an extension has been given, will not be accepted. If you are having problems completing an assignment, please contact the tutor as early as possible.

OUA Special Circumstances Process Special Circumstances refers to late withdrawal from a unit and your request to have your circumstances taken into account for a possible refund of fees and removal of a “fail” result. Applications for Special Circumstances are to be submitted to Open Universities Australia directly. https://www.open.edu.au/public/student-admin-and-support/student-support-services/special-circumstances

 

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Hurdle Due
Quiz 10% Sunday Week 4
Mid-Term Exam 35% Sunday Week 9
Research Paper 40% Sunday Week 13
Weekly Participation 15% Weekly

Quiz

Due: Sunday Week 4
Weighting: 10%

Students will complete a short online 'quiz'. The quiz is multiple choice and open book, with 10 questions on the topics covered in Weeks 2, 3 and 4.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Discover the variety of humanity, including the peculiarity of Western traits, ways we understand ourselves, and social roles.
  • Interrogate ‘human nature’ to better understand the relationship between universal traits and variability.
  • Explore the role of social setting and norms in shaping human development.

Mid-Term Exam

Due: Sunday Week 9
Weighting: 35%

Students will complete an online exam. The exam is multiple choice and open book, with 30 questions on topics covered in Weeks 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9.

 


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Discover the variety of humanity, including the peculiarity of Western traits, ways we understand ourselves, and social roles.
  • Interrogate ‘human nature’ to better understand the relationship between universal traits and variability.
  • Explore the role of social setting and norms in shaping human development.

Research Paper

Due: Sunday Week 13
Weighting: 40%

Students will submit a research project on a topic of their choosing, closely related to themes of the unit. Maximum word length (including references and bibliography) is 3000 words.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Discover the variety of humanity, including the peculiarity of Western traits, ways we understand ourselves, and social roles.
  • Interrogate ‘human nature’ to better understand the relationship between universal traits and variability.
  • Explore the role of social setting and norms in shaping human development.
  • Gain greater understanding of techniques for investigating experience, including ethnography, field research, and comparative approaches.
  • Investigate in greater depth one area of special interest in the study of human diversity.
  • Improve writing, communication and critical reading skills.

Weekly Participation

Due: Weekly
Weighting: 15%

Students will participate in discussions and other activities related to the topic of the relevant week.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Discover the variety of humanity, including the peculiarity of Western traits, ways we understand ourselves, and social roles.
  • Interrogate ‘human nature’ to better understand the relationship between universal traits and variability.
  • Explore the role of social setting and norms in shaping human development.
  • Actively participate in discussion of psychological anthropology (such as gender roles, emotional variation, sex and gender across cultures, and childrearing)
  • Gain greater understanding of techniques for investigating experience, including ethnography, field research, and comparative approaches.
  • Improve writing, communication and critical reading skills.

Delivery and Resources

The required readings for each week, as well as many other relevant readings, are available on Macquarie University Library’s eReserve for ANTX207.   Online units can be accessed at: http://ilearn.mq.edu.au/

PC and Internet access are required. Basic computer skills (e.g., internet browsing) and skills in word processing are also a requirement.

Please contact teaching staff for any further, more specific requirements. Consult the OUA website for more detailed information on technology requirements: http://www.open.edu.au/public/future-students/getting-started/computer-requirements

 

Policies and Procedures

Late Submission

Unless otherwise stated, late submission of written work will result in a deduction of 10% of the mark awarded for each week or part of a week beyond the due date, or date to which an extension has been granted.

Extension Request

Disruption to Studies Procedure (http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/disruption_studies/procedure.html)

The University recognises that students may experience disruptions that adversely affect their academic performance in assessment activities.

The disruption to studies policy (http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/disruption_studies/policy.html) applies only to serious and unavoidable disruptions that arise after a study period has commenced.

Serious and unavoidable disruption

The University classifies a disruption as serious and unavoidable if it:

  • could not have reasonably been anticipated, avoided or guarded against by the student; and
  • was beyond the student's control; and
  • caused substantial disruption to the student's capacity for effective study and/or completion of required work; and
  • occurred during an event critical study period and was at least three (3) consecutive days duration, and/or
  • prevented completion of a final examination.

If you feel that you've been impacted by a serious and unavoidable disruption to study situation, submit an application as follows:

  1. Visit Ask MQ (https://ask.mq.edu.au) and use your OneID to log in via 'Current student domestic and international'
  2. Under 'Forms' select 'disruptions' and fill in your relevant details.
  3. Attach supporting documents by clicking 'Add a reply', click 'browse' and navigating to the files you want to attach, then click 'submit form' to send your notification and supporting documents
  4. Please keep copies of your original documents, as they may be requested in the future as part of the assessment process

Review

Once your submission is assessed, recommendations are sent to your unit convenor to ensure an appropriate solution for affected assessment(s) is organised.

OUA Specific Policies and Procedures

OUA Special Circumstances Process

Special Circumstances refers to late withdrawal from a unit and your request to have your circumstances taken into account for a possible refund of fees and removal of a "fail" result.

Applications for Special Circumstances are to be submitted to Open Universities Australia directly:

https://www.open.edu.au/public/student-admin-and-support/student-support-services/special-circumstances

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central. Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Academic Honesty Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/academic_honesty/policy.html

Assessment Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/assessment/policy_2016.html

Grade Appeal Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/gradeappeal/policy.html

Complaint Management Procedure for Students and Members of the Public http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/complaint_management/procedure.html​

Disruption to Studies Policy (in effect until Dec 4th, 2017): http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/disruption_studies/policy.html

Special Consideration Policy (in effect from Dec 4th, 2017): https://staff.mq.edu.au/work/strategy-planning-and-governance/university-policies-and-procedures/policies/special-consideration

In addition, a number of other policies can be found in the Learning and Teaching Category of Policy Central.

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/support/student_conduct/

Results

Results shown in iLearn, or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent. For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au.

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Learning Skills

Learning Skills (mq.edu.au/learningskills) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to improve your marks and take control of your study.

Student Enquiry Service

For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at ask.mq.edu.au

Equity Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

IT Help

For help with University computer systems and technology, visit http://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/information_technology/help/

When using the University's IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use of IT Resources Policy. The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network including students.

Graduate Capabilities

Critical, Analytical and Integrative Thinking

We want our graduates to be capable of reasoning, questioning and analysing, and to integrate and synthesise learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments; to be able to critique constraints, assumptions and limitations; to be able to think independently and systemically in relation to scholarly activity, in the workplace, and in the world. We want them to have a level of scientific and information technology literacy.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Discover the variety of humanity, including the peculiarity of Western traits, ways we understand ourselves, and social roles.
  • Interrogate ‘human nature’ to better understand the relationship between universal traits and variability.
  • Explore the role of social setting and norms in shaping human development.
  • Actively participate in discussion of psychological anthropology (such as gender roles, emotional variation, sex and gender across cultures, and childrearing)
  • Investigate in greater depth one area of special interest in the study of human diversity.
  • Improve writing, communication and critical reading skills.

Assessment tasks

  • Quiz
  • Mid-Term Exam
  • Research Paper
  • Weekly Participation

Creative and Innovative

Our graduates will also be capable of creative thinking and of creating knowledge. They will be imaginative and open to experience and capable of innovation at work and in the community. We want them to be engaged in applying their critical, creative thinking.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Discover the variety of humanity, including the peculiarity of Western traits, ways we understand ourselves, and social roles.
  • Interrogate ‘human nature’ to better understand the relationship between universal traits and variability.
  • Gain greater understanding of techniques for investigating experience, including ethnography, field research, and comparative approaches.
  • Improve writing, communication and critical reading skills.

Assessment tasks

  • Research Paper
  • Weekly Participation

Capable of Professional and Personal Judgement and Initiative

We want our graduates to have emotional intelligence and sound interpersonal skills and to demonstrate discernment and common sense in their professional and personal judgement. They will exercise initiative as needed. They will be capable of risk assessment, and be able to handle ambiguity and complexity, enabling them to be adaptable in diverse and changing environments.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Explore the role of social setting and norms in shaping human development.
  • Actively participate in discussion of psychological anthropology (such as gender roles, emotional variation, sex and gender across cultures, and childrearing)
  • Gain greater understanding of techniques for investigating experience, including ethnography, field research, and comparative approaches.
  • Investigate in greater depth one area of special interest in the study of human diversity.
  • Improve writing, communication and critical reading skills.

Assessment tasks

  • Research Paper
  • Weekly Participation

Discipline Specific Knowledge and Skills

Our graduates will take with them the intellectual development, depth and breadth of knowledge, scholarly understanding, and specific subject content in their chosen fields to make them competent and confident in their subject or profession. They will be able to demonstrate, where relevant, professional technical competence and meet professional standards. They will be able to articulate the structure of knowledge of their discipline, be able to adapt discipline-specific knowledge to novel situations, and be able to contribute from their discipline to inter-disciplinary solutions to problems.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Discover the variety of humanity, including the peculiarity of Western traits, ways we understand ourselves, and social roles.
  • Interrogate ‘human nature’ to better understand the relationship between universal traits and variability.
  • Explore the role of social setting and norms in shaping human development.
  • Actively participate in discussion of psychological anthropology (such as gender roles, emotional variation, sex and gender across cultures, and childrearing)
  • Gain greater understanding of techniques for investigating experience, including ethnography, field research, and comparative approaches.
  • Investigate in greater depth one area of special interest in the study of human diversity.
  • Improve writing, communication and critical reading skills.

Assessment tasks

  • Quiz
  • Mid-Term Exam
  • Research Paper
  • Weekly Participation

Problem Solving and Research Capability

Our graduates should be capable of researching; of analysing, and interpreting and assessing data and information in various forms; of drawing connections across fields of knowledge; and they should be able to relate their knowledge to complex situations at work or in the world, in order to diagnose and solve problems. We want them to have the confidence to take the initiative in doing so, within an awareness of their own limitations.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Discover the variety of humanity, including the peculiarity of Western traits, ways we understand ourselves, and social roles.
  • Interrogate ‘human nature’ to better understand the relationship between universal traits and variability.
  • Explore the role of social setting and norms in shaping human development.
  • Actively participate in discussion of psychological anthropology (such as gender roles, emotional variation, sex and gender across cultures, and childrearing)
  • Gain greater understanding of techniques for investigating experience, including ethnography, field research, and comparative approaches.
  • Investigate in greater depth one area of special interest in the study of human diversity.
  • Improve writing, communication and critical reading skills.

Assessment tasks

  • Research Paper
  • Weekly Participation

Effective Communication

We want to develop in our students the ability to communicate and convey their views in forms effective with different audiences. We want our graduates to take with them the capability to read, listen, question, gather and evaluate information resources in a variety of formats, assess, write clearly, speak effectively, and to use visual communication and communication technologies as appropriate.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Actively participate in discussion of psychological anthropology (such as gender roles, emotional variation, sex and gender across cultures, and childrearing)
  • Gain greater understanding of techniques for investigating experience, including ethnography, field research, and comparative approaches.
  • Investigate in greater depth one area of special interest in the study of human diversity.
  • Improve writing, communication and critical reading skills.

Assessment tasks

  • Research Paper
  • Weekly Participation

Engaged and Ethical Local and Global citizens

As local citizens our graduates will be aware of indigenous perspectives and of the nation's historical context. They will be engaged with the challenges of contemporary society and with knowledge and ideas. We want our graduates to have respect for diversity, to be open-minded, sensitive to others and inclusive, and to be open to other cultures and perspectives: they should have a level of cultural literacy. Our graduates should be aware of disadvantage and social justice, and be willing to participate to help create a wiser and better society.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Discover the variety of humanity, including the peculiarity of Western traits, ways we understand ourselves, and social roles.
  • Explore the role of social setting and norms in shaping human development.
  • Actively participate in discussion of psychological anthropology (such as gender roles, emotional variation, sex and gender across cultures, and childrearing)
  • Gain greater understanding of techniques for investigating experience, including ethnography, field research, and comparative approaches.
  • Investigate in greater depth one area of special interest in the study of human diversity.
  • Improve writing, communication and critical reading skills.

Assessment tasks

  • Research Paper
  • Weekly Participation

Socially and Environmentally Active and Responsible

We want our graduates to be aware of and have respect for self and others; to be able to work with others as a leader and a team player; to have a sense of connectedness with others and country; and to have a sense of mutual obligation. Our graduates should be informed and active participants in moving society towards sustainability.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Interrogate ‘human nature’ to better understand the relationship between universal traits and variability.
  • Explore the role of social setting and norms in shaping human development.
  • Actively participate in discussion of psychological anthropology (such as gender roles, emotional variation, sex and gender across cultures, and childrearing)
  • Gain greater understanding of techniques for investigating experience, including ethnography, field research, and comparative approaches.
  • Investigate in greater depth one area of special interest in the study of human diversity.
  • Improve writing, communication and critical reading skills.

Assessment tasks

  • Research Paper
  • Weekly Participation

Commitment to Continuous Learning

Our graduates will have enquiring minds and a literate curiosity which will lead them to pursue knowledge for its own sake. They will continue to pursue learning in their careers and as they participate in the world. They will be capable of reflecting on their experiences and relationships with others and the environment, learning from them, and growing - personally, professionally and socially.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Actively participate in discussion of psychological anthropology (such as gender roles, emotional variation, sex and gender across cultures, and childrearing)
  • Investigate in greater depth one area of special interest in the study of human diversity.
  • Improve writing, communication and critical reading skills.

Assessment tasks

  • Quiz
  • Mid-Term Exam
  • Research Paper
  • Weekly Participation