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HLTH108 – Introduction to Anatomy

2017 – S2 External

General Information

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Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff Co-convenor
Anneliese Hulme
Contact via 9850 6392
C5C 341
By appointment
Co-convenor
Stephanie Marhoff-Beard
Contact via 9850 6947
C5C 341
By appointment
Stephanie Marhoff-Beard
Credit points Credit points
3
Prerequisites Prerequisites
Corequisites Corequisites
Co-badged status Co-badged status
Unit description Unit description
This is an introductory unit which presents the basic concepts in gross anatomy, histology and embryology. All systems of the human body are introduced and described at the microscopic and macroscopic levels. The unit also focuses on clinical and surface anatomy. Anatomical models, histology slides and medical imagery are used in the practical sessions and tutorials.

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at http://students.mq.edu.au/student_admin/enrolmentguide/academicdates/

Learning Outcomes

  1. Adopt and be able to use anatomical terminology: define and understand the anatomical position, anatomical planes, sections and directional terms.
  2. Describe different levels of structural organisation of the human body.
  3. Name and identify the four basic tissues and describe the major characteristics of each.
  4. Describe the major developmental events that occur during the embryonic and fetal periods.
  5. Describe and identify the microscopic and macroscopic anatomy of all systems of the human body and explain their function and integration: Integumentary, Skeletal, Muscular, Cardiovascular, Lymphatic, Nervous, Endocrine, Respiratory, Digestive, Urinary, Reproductive.
  6. Apply the knowledge of anatomy within the clinical and research contexts.

General Assessment Information

Serious and unavoidable disruption: The University classifies a disruption as serious and unavoidable if it:

  • could not have reasonably been anticipated, avoided or guarded against by the student; and
  • was beyond the student's control; and
  • caused substantial disruption to the student's capacity for effective study and/or completion of required work; and
  • occurred during an event critical study period and was at least three (3) consecutive days duration, and/or
  • prevented completion of a final examination.

 

Students with a pre-existing disability/health condition or prolonged adverse circumstances may be eligible for ongoing assistance and support.  Such support is governed by other policies and may be sought and coordinated through Campus Wellbeing and Support Services.

 

If a supplementary examination is granted as a result of the disruption to studies process the examination will be scheduled after the conclusion of the official examination period. (Individual Faculties may wish to signal when the Faculty Supplementary exams are normally scheduled.)

If you are granted a supplementary exam via the Disruption to Studies process, you will have to write a supplementary exam in the supplementary exam period. In this scenario, only your supplementary exam mark will count towards your final exam mark, irrespective of whether or not you attended the final exam in the normal examination period. The submission of a Disruption to Studies form should not be used as a ‘just in case’ strategy.

You are advised that it is Macquarie University policy not to set early examinations for individuals or groups of students. You are expected to ensure that you are available until the end of the teaching semester that is the final day of the official examination period.

If you apply for Disruption to Study for your final examination, you must make yourself available for the official supplementary week for the Faculty of Science and Engineering .  If you are not available at that time, there is no guarantee an additional examination time will be offered. Specific examination dates and times will be determined at a later date.

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Hurdle Due
Online Quizzes 20% Weeks 2, 4, 7, 8, 10 and 12..
Practical test 1 20% Sunday 17 September
Practical test 2 20% Sunday 12 November
Final Examination 40% No University Examination Period

Online Quizzes

Due: Weeks 2, 4, 7, 8, 10 and 12..
Weighting: 20%

Six on-line quizzes related to selected learning outcomes.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Adopt and be able to use anatomical terminology: define and understand the anatomical position, anatomical planes, sections and directional terms.
  • Describe different levels of structural organisation of the human body.
  • Name and identify the four basic tissues and describe the major characteristics of each.
  • Describe the major developmental events that occur during the embryonic and fetal periods.
  • Describe and identify the microscopic and macroscopic anatomy of all systems of the human body and explain their function and integration: Integumentary, Skeletal, Muscular, Cardiovascular, Lymphatic, Nervous, Endocrine, Respiratory, Digestive, Urinary, Reproductive.
  • Apply the knowledge of anatomy within the clinical and research contexts.

Practical test 1

Due: Sunday 17 September
Weighting: 20%

Practical test (related to models and histology slides used during the practicals and tutorials). Test one will cover lecture material weeks 1-6 and Practical sessions 1 and 2.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Adopt and be able to use anatomical terminology: define and understand the anatomical position, anatomical planes, sections and directional terms.
  • Describe different levels of structural organisation of the human body.
  • Name and identify the four basic tissues and describe the major characteristics of each.
  • Describe the major developmental events that occur during the embryonic and fetal periods.
  • Describe and identify the microscopic and macroscopic anatomy of all systems of the human body and explain their function and integration: Integumentary, Skeletal, Muscular, Cardiovascular, Lymphatic, Nervous, Endocrine, Respiratory, Digestive, Urinary, Reproductive.
  • Apply the knowledge of anatomy within the clinical and research contexts.

Practical test 2

Due: Sunday 12 November
Weighting: 20%

Practical test (related to models and histology slides used during the practicals and tutorials). Test two will cover lecture material weeks 7-13 and Practical sessions 3 and 4.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Adopt and be able to use anatomical terminology: define and understand the anatomical position, anatomical planes, sections and directional terms.
  • Describe different levels of structural organisation of the human body.
  • Name and identify the four basic tissues and describe the major characteristics of each.
  • Describe the major developmental events that occur during the embryonic and fetal periods.
  • Describe and identify the microscopic and macroscopic anatomy of all systems of the human body and explain their function and integration: Integumentary, Skeletal, Muscular, Cardiovascular, Lymphatic, Nervous, Endocrine, Respiratory, Digestive, Urinary, Reproductive.
  • Apply the knowledge of anatomy within the clinical and research contexts.

Final Examination

Due: University Examination Period
Weighting: 40%

This will cover the content of the entire semester. Questions will include multiple choice questions, short answer questions and short essay questions. The final exam covers weeks 1-13.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Adopt and be able to use anatomical terminology: define and understand the anatomical position, anatomical planes, sections and directional terms.
  • Describe different levels of structural organisation of the human body.
  • Name and identify the four basic tissues and describe the major characteristics of each.
  • Describe the major developmental events that occur during the embryonic and fetal periods.
  • Describe and identify the microscopic and macroscopic anatomy of all systems of the human body and explain their function and integration: Integumentary, Skeletal, Muscular, Cardiovascular, Lymphatic, Nervous, Endocrine, Respiratory, Digestive, Urinary, Reproductive.
  • Apply the knowledge of anatomy within the clinical and research contexts.

Delivery and Resources

Attendance 

This unit is characterized by a moderate degree of flexibility. It incorporates a variety

of learning tools and media. It will comprise: 

1. Three 1-hour lectures per week, delivered online weeks 1-13.

2. Four Saturday, full day (9am-5pm), on campus sessions which includes practicals and tutorial sessions (weeks 5, 7, 11, 13). These will be held in anatomy laboratories and university classrooms; discussions will be carried; histology slides, anatomy models and flow charts will be used.

3. Two Sunday, half day (9am-5pm) revision and practical examination sessions (weeks 7 and 13). 

It is expected that you participate in a minimum of 70% of practical and tutorial classes on the weekend sessions in order for it to be deemed that you have made a serious attempt of this unit. Participation will be marked at the start of the practical and tutorial classes. 

 

Required and Recommended Texts and/or Materials

 

Core:

Tortora GJ and Derrickson B. 2015. Introduction to the Human Body. 10th ed. Wiley.

 

HLTH108 Introduction to Anatomy Laboratory Manual - available at Co-op Shop bookshop.

 

Alternative textbook:

Tortora GJ and Nielsen MT. 2014. Principles of Human Anatomy. 13th ed. Wiley.

 

Recommended:

 

More detailed anatomy textbooks:

Drake RL, Vogl AW and Mitchell AWM. 2015. Gray’s Anatomy for Students. 3nd ed. Elsevier.

 

Moore KL and Dalley AF. 2014. Clinically Oriented Anatomy 7th ed. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

 

Atlases:

Abrahams PH, Spratt JD, Loukas M, van Schoor AN. 2013. McMinn’s Clinical Atlas of Human Anatomy. 6th ed. Mosby/Saunder Elsevier.

 

Histology:

Mescher AL. 2013. Junqueira’s Basic Histology. 13th ed. McGraw Hill.

Unit Schedule

 

WEEK

LECTURE

Location

1

31 July

Introduction

Cells, Basic Tissues, Epithelium

ONLINE

 

2

7 August

Connective Tissue

Axial Skeleton

Appendicular Skeleton

 

Quiz 1

3

14 August

Joints

Bone Tissue

Muscle Tissue

4

21 August

Embryology

Skeletal Muscles

 

Quiz 2

5

28 August

Skin

Cardiovascular System

Saturday September 2, 9-5pm Practical 1

Topics: Cell Biology, Epithelium, Terminology and Orientation, Bones, Connective Tissue Proper, Bones, Joints, Specialised Connective Tissues

ON CAMPUS

6

4 September

Blood

Revision

ONLINE

 

7

11 September

Lymphatic System

Nervous Tissue

Brain-Part 1

 

Quiz 3

Saturday September 16, 9-5pm Practical 2

Topics: Embryology, Skeletal Muscles, Muscle Tissue, Muscles, Cardiovascular System, Skin

 

Sunday September 17, 9-12 Revision and Practical Test 1

ON CAMPUS

18 September-2 October

Session 2 recess

 

8

3 October

Brain- Part 2 and Cranial Nerves

Spinal Cord and Spinal Nerves

Autonomic Nervous System

 

Quiz 4

ONLINE

 

9

9 October

Endocrine System

Respiratory System

10

16 October

Digestive System 1

Digestive System 2

 

Quiz 5

11

23 October

Special Senses

Urinary System

Saturday October 28, 9-5pm Practical 3

Topics: Nervous System, Respiratory System, Blood and Lymphatic System, Endocrine Systems

ON CAMPUS

12

30 October

Somatic Senses and Motor Control

Reproductive System

 

Quiz 6

ONLINE

 

13

6 November

Surface Anatomy

Saturday November 11, 9-5pm Practical 4

Topics: Digestive system (1 and 2), Urinary System, Reproductive System, Special Senses

 

Sunday November 12, 9-5pm Practical Test 2

ON CAMPUS

 

Policies and Procedures

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central. Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Academic Honesty Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/academic_honesty/policy.html

Assessment Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/assessment/policy_2016.html

Grade Appeal Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/gradeappeal/policy.html

Complaint Management Procedure for Students and Members of the Public http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/complaint_management/procedure.html​

Disruption to Studies Policy (in effect until Dec 4th, 2017): http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/disruption_studies/policy.html

Special Consideration Policy (in effect from Dec 4th, 2017): https://staff.mq.edu.au/work/strategy-planning-and-governance/university-policies-and-procedures/policies/special-consideration

In addition, a number of other policies can be found in the Learning and Teaching Category of Policy Central.

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/support/student_conduct/

Results

Results shown in iLearn, or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent. For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au.

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Learning Skills

Learning Skills (mq.edu.au/learningskills) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to improve your marks and take control of your study.

Student Enquiry Service

For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at ask.mq.edu.au

Equity Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

IT Help

For help with University computer systems and technology, visit http://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/information_technology/help/

When using the University's IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use of IT Resources Policy. The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network including students.

Graduate Capabilities

Discipline Specific Knowledge and Skills

Our graduates will take with them the intellectual development, depth and breadth of knowledge, scholarly understanding, and specific subject content in their chosen fields to make them competent and confident in their subject or profession. They will be able to demonstrate, where relevant, professional technical competence and meet professional standards. They will be able to articulate the structure of knowledge of their discipline, be able to adapt discipline-specific knowledge to novel situations, and be able to contribute from their discipline to inter-disciplinary solutions to problems.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Adopt and be able to use anatomical terminology: define and understand the anatomical position, anatomical planes, sections and directional terms.
  • Describe different levels of structural organisation of the human body.
  • Name and identify the four basic tissues and describe the major characteristics of each.
  • Describe the major developmental events that occur during the embryonic and fetal periods.
  • Describe and identify the microscopic and macroscopic anatomy of all systems of the human body and explain their function and integration: Integumentary, Skeletal, Muscular, Cardiovascular, Lymphatic, Nervous, Endocrine, Respiratory, Digestive, Urinary, Reproductive.

Assessment tasks

  • Online Quizzes
  • Practical test 1
  • Practical test 2
  • Final Examination

Problem Solving and Research Capability

Our graduates should be capable of researching; of analysing, and interpreting and assessing data and information in various forms; of drawing connections across fields of knowledge; and they should be able to relate their knowledge to complex situations at work or in the world, in order to diagnose and solve problems. We want them to have the confidence to take the initiative in doing so, within an awareness of their own limitations.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • Apply the knowledge of anatomy within the clinical and research contexts.

Assessment tasks

  • Online Quizzes
  • Final Examination

Creative and Innovative

Our graduates will also be capable of creative thinking and of creating knowledge. They will be imaginative and open to experience and capable of innovation at work and in the community. We want them to be engaged in applying their critical, creative thinking.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • Apply the knowledge of anatomy within the clinical and research contexts.

Assessment tasks

  • Online Quizzes
  • Practical test 2
  • Final Examination

Effective Communication

We want to develop in our students the ability to communicate and convey their views in forms effective with different audiences. We want our graduates to take with them the capability to read, listen, question, gather and evaluate information resources in a variety of formats, assess, write clearly, speak effectively, and to use visual communication and communication technologies as appropriate.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • Adopt and be able to use anatomical terminology: define and understand the anatomical position, anatomical planes, sections and directional terms.

Assessment tasks

  • Online Quizzes
  • Practical test 1
  • Practical test 2
  • Final Examination

Engaged and Ethical Local and Global citizens

As local citizens our graduates will be aware of indigenous perspectives and of the nation's historical context. They will be engaged with the challenges of contemporary society and with knowledge and ideas. We want our graduates to have respect for diversity, to be open-minded, sensitive to others and inclusive, and to be open to other cultures and perspectives: they should have a level of cultural literacy. Our graduates should be aware of disadvantage and social justice, and be willing to participate to help create a wiser and better society.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • Apply the knowledge of anatomy within the clinical and research contexts.

Assessment tasks

  • Online Quizzes
  • Final Examination

Capable of Professional and Personal Judgement and Initiative

We want our graduates to have emotional intelligence and sound interpersonal skills and to demonstrate discernment and common sense in their professional and personal judgement. They will exercise initiative as needed. They will be capable of risk assessment, and be able to handle ambiguity and complexity, enabling them to be adaptable in diverse and changing environments.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • Apply the knowledge of anatomy within the clinical and research contexts.

Assessment tasks

  • Online Quizzes
  • Practical test 1
  • Practical test 2
  • Final Examination

Commitment to Continuous Learning

Our graduates will have enquiring minds and a literate curiosity which will lead them to pursue knowledge for its own sake. They will continue to pursue learning in their careers and as they participate in the world. They will be capable of reflecting on their experiences and relationships with others and the environment, learning from them, and growing - personally, professionally and socially.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Adopt and be able to use anatomical terminology: define and understand the anatomical position, anatomical planes, sections and directional terms.
  • Describe different levels of structural organisation of the human body.
  • Name and identify the four basic tissues and describe the major characteristics of each.
  • Describe the major developmental events that occur during the embryonic and fetal periods.
  • Describe and identify the microscopic and macroscopic anatomy of all systems of the human body and explain their function and integration: Integumentary, Skeletal, Muscular, Cardiovascular, Lymphatic, Nervous, Endocrine, Respiratory, Digestive, Urinary, Reproductive.

Assessment tasks

  • Online Quizzes
  • Practical test 1
  • Practical test 2
  • Final Examination

Critical, Analytical and Integrative Thinking

We want our graduates to be capable of reasoning, questioning and analysing, and to integrate and synthesise learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments; to be able to critique constraints, assumptions and limitations; to be able to think independently and systemically in relation to scholarly activity, in the workplace, and in the world. We want them to have a level of scientific and information technology literacy.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • Describe and identify the microscopic and macroscopic anatomy of all systems of the human body and explain their function and integration: Integumentary, Skeletal, Muscular, Cardiovascular, Lymphatic, Nervous, Endocrine, Respiratory, Digestive, Urinary, Reproductive.

Assessment tasks

  • Online Quizzes
  • Practical test 1
  • Practical test 2
  • Final Examination

Socially and Environmentally Active and Responsible

We want our graduates to be aware of and have respect for self and others; to be able to work with others as a leader and a team player; to have a sense of connectedness with others and country; and to have a sense of mutual obligation. Our graduates should be informed and active participants in moving society towards sustainability.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • Apply the knowledge of anatomy within the clinical and research contexts.

Assessment tasks

  • Online Quizzes
  • Practical test 1
  • Practical test 2
  • Final Examination

Changes from Previous Offering

Previous offering was an internal offering. External offering is new in 2017. Lectures are delivered only online and all face to face teaching is organised into four full day campus sessions and 2 half day sessions.