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ENGL370 – Reason, Imagination, Revolution: Literature and Culture from Pope to Austen

2017 – S1 Day

General Information

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Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff Lecturer, Tutor, Convenor
Geoffrey Payne
Contact via 98508726
W6A631
Tuesday 10-11am
Lecturer, Tutor
Ryan Twomey
Contact via 98508743
W6A621
tba
Lecturer
Stephanie Russo
Contact via 98508731
W6A623
Credit points Credit points
3
Prerequisites Prerequisites
6cp in ENGL units at 200 level
Corequisites Corequisites
Co-badged status Co-badged status
Unit description Unit description
This unit introduces students to writings that track the trajectories of formal, philosophical and culture change in British literary culture between 1710 and 1825. It examines how Reason is idealised and critiqued by writers associated with the Enlightenment, such as Pope, Swift, Haywood and Johnson, and how it is situated in relation to Imagination and developed into the Romanticism of Blake, Wordsworth and Coleridge. The unit also explores how those conceptual exchanges feed into the revolutionary fervour of the 1790s and provokes the responses of Austen, Shelley, Byron and Keats, who along with their Romantic forebears, set the cultural bases for British literature into the nineteenth century.

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at http://students.mq.edu.au/student_admin/enrolmentguide/academicdates/

Learning Outcomes

  1. Demonstrate an understanding of key texts drawn from eighteenth-century Britain and the British Romantic movement as well as of the contexts in which they were produced.
  2. Select and apply appropriate theoretical and critical models in the practice of analysing literary texts and contexts.
  3. Deploy analytical and research skills that can be applied to both past and present cultural and literary debates.
  4. Communicate historical and theoretical concepts in both oral and written form.
  5. Design and execute coherent critical and analytical arguments.
  6. Engage in creative critical discussion of the unit content with peers and tutors, and to respond to others’ points of view .

General Assessment Information

Assignment submission

Turnitin Submission

Written work must be submitted electronically via Turnitin. The links for each assignment can be found on the ENGL370 iLearn site.

Return of marked work

Marked work will be returned to students via Turnitin.

Extensions and special consideration

Late submission of written work or tutorial presentations without prior approval and supporting documentation (e.g. a medical or counselling certificate) will attract a penalty of 2% per day (including weekends). If you have a legitimate reason for being unable to submit your work on time, for which you can provide documentation, contact your tutor to discuss an extension (before the due date).

Extension Request

Disruption to Studies Procedure (http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/disruption_studies/procedure.html)

The University recognises that students may experience disruptions that adversely affect their academic performance in assessment activities.

The disruption to studies policy (http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/disruption_studies/policy.html) applies only to serious and unavoidable disruptions that arise after a study period has commenced.

Serious and unavoidable disruption

The University classifies a disruption as serious and unavoidable if it:

  • could not have reasonably been anticipated, avoided or guarded against by the student; and
  • was beyond the student's control; and
  • caused substantial disruption to the student's capacity for effective study and/or completion of required work; and
  • occurred during an event critical study period and was at least three (3) consecutive days duration, and/or
  • prevented completion of a final examination.

If you feel that you've been impacted by a serious and unavoidable disruption to study situation, submit an application as follows:

  1. Visit Ask MQ (https://ask.mq.edu.au) and use your OneID to log in via 'Current student domestic and international'
  2. Under 'Forms' select 'disruptions' and fill in your relevant details.
  3. Attach supporting documents by clicking 'Add a reply', click 'browse' and navigating to the files you want to attach, then click 'submit form' to send your notification and supporting documents
  4. Please keep copies of your original documents, as they may be requested in the future as part of the assessment process

Review

Once your submission is assessed, recommendations are sent to your unit convenor to ensure an appropriate solution for affected assessment(s) is organised.

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Due
Essay One 30% 23 April 2017
Essay Two 50% 18 June 2017
Preparation and Participation 20% Weekly, ongoing.

Essay One

Due: 23 April 2017
Weighting: 30%

Students will write a critical essay responding to a set topic. For details of the task and topics, see the ENGL370 iLearn website.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Demonstrate an understanding of key texts drawn from eighteenth-century Britain and the British Romantic movement as well as of the contexts in which they were produced.
  • Select and apply appropriate theoretical and critical models in the practice of analysing literary texts and contexts.
  • Deploy analytical and research skills that can be applied to both past and present cultural and literary debates.
  • Communicate historical and theoretical concepts in both oral and written form.
  • Design and execute coherent critical and analytical arguments.
  • Engage in creative critical discussion of the unit content with peers and tutors, and to respond to others’ points of view .

Essay Two

Due: 18 June 2017
Weighting: 50%

Students will write a research essay responding to a set topic. For details of the task and topics, see the ENGL370 iLearn website.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Demonstrate an understanding of key texts drawn from eighteenth-century Britain and the British Romantic movement as well as of the contexts in which they were produced.
  • Select and apply appropriate theoretical and critical models in the practice of analysing literary texts and contexts.
  • Deploy analytical and research skills that can be applied to both past and present cultural and literary debates.
  • Communicate historical and theoretical concepts in both oral and written form.
  • Design and execute coherent critical and analytical arguments.
  • Engage in creative critical discussion of the unit content with peers and tutors, and to respond to others’ points of view .

Preparation and Participation

Due: Weekly, ongoing.
Weighting: 20%

Completion of weekly online preparation exercise, tutorial attendance, preparation for and participation in class activities. For details, see the ENGL370 iLearn site.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Demonstrate an understanding of key texts drawn from eighteenth-century Britain and the British Romantic movement as well as of the contexts in which they were produced.
  • Communicate historical and theoretical concepts in both oral and written form.
  • Engage in creative critical discussion of the unit content with peers and tutors, and to respond to others’ points of view .

Delivery and Resources

Unit Requirements and Expectations

Students are expected to attend one lecture and one tutorial each week. Attendance at lectures is expected; attendance at tutorials is compulsory in order to remain eligible to pass the unit's participation assessment task. Prior to attending tutorials, you must complete the weekly online assessment tasks via the ENGL370 iLearn page. When attending tutorials, students are expected to have read the texts set for discussion in that week and to be prepared to discuss issues arising from course content. Students must also complete all assessment tasks as set out in the assessment schedule for this unit.  

  Required and recommended texts and/or materials

1. Greenblatt, Stephen, et al. eds. The Norton Anthology of English Literature. 9th ed. Vols C + D. New York: W.W. Norton & Co., 2005. These books can be purchased separately, but the Co-op has put together a package that delivers them at a reduced price.

2. Frances Burney. Evelina. Norton Critical Edition. Ed.Stewart J. Cooke. New York and London: W.W. Norton & Co., 1998.

3. Maria Edgeworth. Castle Rackrent. Norton Critical Edition. Ed. Ryan Twomey. New York and London: W.W. Norton and Sons, 2014.

4. Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice. Eds. Donald Gray and Mary A. Favret. Norton Critical Edition. 4ed. 2001.  

  Unit webpage and technology used and required

Online units can be accessed at: http://ilearn.mq.edu.au

 

Unit Schedule

 

Week 1 Introducing Literature of the Long Eighteenth Century in Britain
Week 2 The Legacy of the Restoration and the Augustans. Alexander Pope. The Rape of the Lock.
Week 3 Emergence of the Novel. Eliza Haywood. Fantomina:, Or, Love in a Maze.
Week 4 Satire and Scepticism. Jonathan Swift. Gulliver's Travels.
Week 5 Life Writing: Montagu, Boswell, Burney.
Week 6 The Age of Johnson. The History of Rasselas, Prince of Abyssinia.
Week 7 The Gothic Rising: Graveyard and Women Poets.
Week 8 Women Writing. Fanny Burney. Evelina.
Week 9 The 1790s. Barbauld, Blake, Burke, Wollstonecraft, Paine.
Week 10 Romanticism: Wordsworth and Coleridge: Lyrical Ballads.
Week 11 The Regional Novel. Maria Edgeworth. Castle Rackrent.
Week 12 Later Romanticism: Byron, Shelley and Keats.
Week 13 Towards the Modern Novel. Jane Austen. Pride and Prejudice.

Policies and Procedures

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central. Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Academic Honesty Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/academic_honesty/policy.html

Assessment Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/assessment/policy_2016.html

Grade Appeal Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/gradeappeal/policy.html

Complaint Management Procedure for Students and Members of the Public http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/complaint_management/procedure.html​

Disruption to Studies Policy http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/disruption_studies/policy.html The Disruption to Studies Policy is effective from March 3 2014 and replaces the Special Consideration Policy.

In addition, a number of other policies can be found in the Learning and Teaching Category of Policy Central.

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/support/student_conduct/

Results

Results shown in iLearn, or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent. For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au.

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Learning Skills

Learning Skills (mq.edu.au/learningskills) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to improve your marks and take control of your study.

Student Enquiry Service

For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at ask.mq.edu.au

Equity Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

IT Help

For help with University computer systems and technology, visit http://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/information_technology/help/

When using the University's IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use of IT Resources Policy. The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network including students.

Graduate Capabilities

Socially and Environmentally Active and Responsible

We want our graduates to be aware of and have respect for self and others; to be able to work with others as a leader and a team player; to have a sense of connectedness with others and country; and to have a sense of mutual obligation. Our graduates should be informed and active participants in moving society towards sustainability.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Deploy analytical and research skills that can be applied to both past and present cultural and literary debates.
  • Engage in creative critical discussion of the unit content with peers and tutors, and to respond to others’ points of view .

Assessment tasks

  • Essay One
  • Essay Two
  • Preparation and Participation

Critical, Analytical and Integrative Thinking

We want our graduates to be capable of reasoning, questioning and analysing, and to integrate and synthesise learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments; to be able to critique constraints, assumptions and limitations; to be able to think independently and systemically in relation to scholarly activity, in the workplace, and in the world. We want them to have a level of scientific and information technology literacy.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Demonstrate an understanding of key texts drawn from eighteenth-century Britain and the British Romantic movement as well as of the contexts in which they were produced.
  • Select and apply appropriate theoretical and critical models in the practice of analysing literary texts and contexts.
  • Deploy analytical and research skills that can be applied to both past and present cultural and literary debates.
  • Design and execute coherent critical and analytical arguments.
  • Engage in creative critical discussion of the unit content with peers and tutors, and to respond to others’ points of view .

Assessment tasks

  • Essay One
  • Essay Two
  • Preparation and Participation

Problem Solving and Research Capability

Our graduates should be capable of researching; of analysing, and interpreting and assessing data and information in various forms; of drawing connections across fields of knowledge; and they should be able to relate their knowledge to complex situations at work or in the world, in order to diagnose and solve problems. We want them to have the confidence to take the initiative in doing so, within an awareness of their own limitations.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Select and apply appropriate theoretical and critical models in the practice of analysing literary texts and contexts.
  • Deploy analytical and research skills that can be applied to both past and present cultural and literary debates.
  • Design and execute coherent critical and analytical arguments.
  • Engage in creative critical discussion of the unit content with peers and tutors, and to respond to others’ points of view .

Assessment tasks

  • Essay One
  • Essay Two
  • Preparation and Participation

Creative and Innovative

Our graduates will also be capable of creative thinking and of creating knowledge. They will be imaginative and open to experience and capable of innovation at work and in the community. We want them to be engaged in applying their critical, creative thinking.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Deploy analytical and research skills that can be applied to both past and present cultural and literary debates.
  • Engage in creative critical discussion of the unit content with peers and tutors, and to respond to others’ points of view .

Assessment tasks

  • Essay One
  • Essay Two
  • Preparation and Participation

Effective Communication

We want to develop in our students the ability to communicate and convey their views in forms effective with different audiences. We want our graduates to take with them the capability to read, listen, question, gather and evaluate information resources in a variety of formats, assess, write clearly, speak effectively, and to use visual communication and communication technologies as appropriate.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Demonstrate an understanding of key texts drawn from eighteenth-century Britain and the British Romantic movement as well as of the contexts in which they were produced.
  • Communicate historical and theoretical concepts in both oral and written form.
  • Design and execute coherent critical and analytical arguments.
  • Engage in creative critical discussion of the unit content with peers and tutors, and to respond to others’ points of view .

Assessment tasks

  • Essay One
  • Essay Two
  • Preparation and Participation

Engaged and Ethical Local and Global citizens

As local citizens our graduates will be aware of indigenous perspectives and of the nation's historical context. They will be engaged with the challenges of contemporary society and with knowledge and ideas. We want our graduates to have respect for diversity, to be open-minded, sensitive to others and inclusive, and to be open to other cultures and perspectives: they should have a level of cultural literacy. Our graduates should be aware of disadvantage and social justice, and be willing to participate to help create a wiser and better society.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Select and apply appropriate theoretical and critical models in the practice of analysing literary texts and contexts.
  • Deploy analytical and research skills that can be applied to both past and present cultural and literary debates.
  • Engage in creative critical discussion of the unit content with peers and tutors, and to respond to others’ points of view .

Assessment tasks

  • Essay One
  • Essay Two
  • Preparation and Participation

Capable of Professional and Personal Judgement and Initiative

We want our graduates to have emotional intelligence and sound interpersonal skills and to demonstrate discernment and common sense in their professional and personal judgement. They will exercise initiative as needed. They will be capable of risk assessment, and be able to handle ambiguity and complexity, enabling them to be adaptable in diverse and changing environments.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Select and apply appropriate theoretical and critical models in the practice of analysing literary texts and contexts.
  • Deploy analytical and research skills that can be applied to both past and present cultural and literary debates.
  • Communicate historical and theoretical concepts in both oral and written form.
  • Engage in creative critical discussion of the unit content with peers and tutors, and to respond to others’ points of view .

Assessment tasks

  • Essay One
  • Essay Two
  • Preparation and Participation

Commitment to Continuous Learning

Our graduates will have enquiring minds and a literate curiosity which will lead them to pursue knowledge for its own sake. They will continue to pursue learning in their careers and as they participate in the world. They will be capable of reflecting on their experiences and relationships with others and the environment, learning from them, and growing - personally, professionally and socially.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Select and apply appropriate theoretical and critical models in the practice of analysing literary texts and contexts.
  • Deploy analytical and research skills that can be applied to both past and present cultural and literary debates.
  • Design and execute coherent critical and analytical arguments.
  • Engage in creative critical discussion of the unit content with peers and tutors, and to respond to others’ points of view .

Assessment tasks

  • Essay One
  • Essay Two
  • Preparation and Participation

Discipline Specific Knowledge and Skills

Our graduates will take with them the intellectual development, depth and breadth of knowledge, scholarly understanding, and specific subject content in their chosen fields to make them competent and confident in their subject or profession. They will be able to demonstrate, where relevant, professional technical competence and meet professional standards. They will be able to articulate the structure of knowledge of their discipline, be able to adapt discipline-specific knowledge to novel situations, and be able to contribute from their discipline to inter-disciplinary solutions to problems.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Demonstrate an understanding of key texts drawn from eighteenth-century Britain and the British Romantic movement as well as of the contexts in which they were produced.
  • Select and apply appropriate theoretical and critical models in the practice of analysing literary texts and contexts.
  • Engage in creative critical discussion of the unit content with peers and tutors, and to respond to others’ points of view .

Assessment tasks

  • Essay One
  • Essay Two
  • Preparation and Participation