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CHN 156 – Introduction to Chinese Culture (Background Speakers)

2017 – S2 Day

General Information

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Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff Lecturer
Kevin Carrico
Contact via Email
Hearing Hub, 2nd Floor, North 041
Tuesday, 2-3pm, Thursday, 3-4pm
Credit points Credit points
3
Prerequisites Prerequisites
Corequisites Corequisites
Co-badged status Co-badged status
Unit description Unit description
This is an introductory unit covering various aspects of Chinese culture, from philosophy to literature, from medicine to cultural aspects of everyday life. This unit is designed for students who have passed HSC Chinese for Background Speakers or who have a similar level of knowledge of Chinese. Lectures, discussion, texts and assignments are in both Chinese and English.

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at http://students.mq.edu.au/student_admin/enrolmentguide/academicdates/

Learning Outcomes

  1. Attain a basic knowledge of Chinese culture and tradition, including Chinese philosophy, history, politics, and their evolution over time.
  2. Develop critical thinking and analytical skills. Students should be able to independently and critically analyse important aspects of Chinese culture, and develop a deeper understanding of the complexities of the idea of "culture."
  3. Acquire general academic and communication skills, including self-awareness, interpersonal skills and working with others, skills in information gathering and management, problem-solving skills, and written and oral communication skills

General Assessment Information

Indicative examples of assessment tasks will be available on iLearn.

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Hurdle Due
Attendance and participation 25% Throughout session
Mid-session exam 25% Week 7
Essay 25% Week 9
Final exam 25% Week 13

Attendance and participation

Due: Throughout session
Weighting: 25%

This is not a simple attendance mark. Marks will not be awarded for attendance, meaning that it is possible to attend every class and still not receive any participation marks. Participation marks are based in your contributions to tutorial discussions.

Attendance is mandatory and deductions for absences will count toward the final grade. Students who miss more than 3 tutorials without evidence of an unforeseen and serious disruption will be excluded from the unit. This means that you will not be permitted to sit the final exam, and automatically receive a Fail grade. See Extensions and Penalties for policies in this regard.

The tutor will look for evidence of student knowledge of set readings and tutorial questions; analysis of those readings and questions expressed in verbal form; ability to complete set tasks; ability and willingness to work with and respond to the views of the tutor and other students in verbal form.

In weekly tutorials, students will form discussion groups to collaborate in discussing weekly tutorial topic/questions, and engage with other groups in the discussion of the week's topic/questions.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Attain a basic knowledge of Chinese culture and tradition, including Chinese philosophy, history, politics, and their evolution over time.
  • Develop critical thinking and analytical skills. Students should be able to independently and critically analyse important aspects of Chinese culture, and develop a deeper understanding of the complexities of the idea of "culture."
  • Acquire general academic and communication skills, including self-awareness, interpersonal skills and working with others, skills in information gathering and management, problem-solving skills, and written and oral communication skills

Mid-session exam

Due: Week 7
Weighting: 25%

An examination based on all materials covered in lectures and tutorials during the first half of the session.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Attain a basic knowledge of Chinese culture and tradition, including Chinese philosophy, history, politics, and their evolution over time.
  • Acquire general academic and communication skills, including self-awareness, interpersonal skills and working with others, skills in information gathering and management, problem-solving skills, and written and oral communication skills

Essay

Due: Week 9
Weighting: 25%

A 1,000 character essay responding to a prompt providing by the instructor in Week 6, due at the end of Week 9.

In completing the essay, students must fulfill the following key criteria. 

a) Grasp of the task and focus. Are you really answering the question(s)? Is there a well-defined framework or scope of argumentation?

b) Knowledge of content and research. For example, is there a well-developed argument? Does the essay reflect a clear, insightful knowledge of the topic in a clear and critical analysis? Does the written work demonstrate a substantial and skilful research effort?The essay may incorporate text materials linked together with your own commentary and conclusions. This will involve research, such as locating materials, books and journal articles.

c) Creativity and judgement. Does the essay show good judgement in the selection or arrangement of materials? Is there evidence to support the argument?

d) Communication and presentation. Does the work show a mastery of the technical aspects of writing an essay? What will be assessed here also include such matters as grammar, punctuation, spelling, citation, etc.

e) Referencing and ethical use of materials. All cited works needs to be properly acknowledged. Is referencing consistent and precise?

A detailed marking rubric will be provided on iLearn.

Assignments should be students' original work. Plagiarism is not acceptable and will result in a mark of 0. For further information and advice, see www.student.mq.edu.au/plagiarism.

Note: All written assignments have to be submitted by the due date via Turnitin. Do not email them to me.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Develop critical thinking and analytical skills. Students should be able to independently and critically analyse important aspects of Chinese culture, and develop a deeper understanding of the complexities of the idea of "culture."
  • Acquire general academic and communication skills, including self-awareness, interpersonal skills and working with others, skills in information gathering and management, problem-solving skills, and written and oral communication skills

Final exam

Due: Week 13
Weighting: 25%

A cumulative examination based on all materials covered in lectures and tutorials, focused upon the second half of the session, but also including essential information from throughout the session.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Attain a basic knowledge of Chinese culture and tradition, including Chinese philosophy, history, politics, and their evolution over time.
  • Acquire general academic and communication skills, including self-awareness, interpersonal skills and working with others, skills in information gathering and management, problem-solving skills, and written and oral communication skills

Delivery and Resources

TECHNOLOGY USED AND REQUIRED

Online Unit

Login is via: https://ilearn.mq.edu.au/

Is my unit in iLearn?: http://help.ilearn.mq.edu.au/unitsonline/ to check when your online unit will become available.

Technology

Students are required to have regular access to a computer and the internet. Mobile devices alone are not sufficient.

For students attending classes on campus we strongly encourage that you bring along your own laptop computer, ready to work with activities in your online unit. The preferred operating system is Windows 10.

Students are required to access the online unit in iLearn by the end of Week 1 and follow any relevant instructions and links for downloads that may be required. If applicable, students are required to download the relevant language package prior to Week 2.

Please contact your course convenor before the end of Week 1 if you do not have a suitable laptop (or tablet) for in-class use.

  •  

Electronic Copy via Turnitin.com

Macquarie University subscribes to the 'Turn It In' plagiarism detection system. All students will be required to submit all of their written work through this system. See Assessment Submission for details.

Library Databases

The library databases offer access to thousands of academic journal articles on all relevant subject areas.  Make a point of searching these databases for scholarly articles for sources of information for assignments.  The library enquiry desk is a good point of assistance in the use of these databases.  You can also the ‘Ask a Librarian’ service by phone or live chat. http://www.mq.edu.au/on_campus/library/

Please direct any questions about passwords, access and iLearn to the IT helpdesk http://informatics.mq.edu.au/help/

Assessment Marking Rubrics 

Assessment Marking Rubrics are required for each assessment task (see Assessment Tasks in General).  They can be downloaded from iLearn.

Unit Schedule

  Topic Reading
Week 1 What is "China"? 陳奕麟解構中國性:族群意識作為文化作為認同之曖昧不明
Week 2 Confucianism 牟岱 从古代哲学思想延续看当代中国文化价值特点》 and excerpts from 论语(陈国庆注译)
Week 3 Daoism Excerpts from 莊子, and Kristofer Schipper, The Taoist Body, Chapters 1-3, "Taoism," "Everyday Religion," and "Divinity" pg. 1-43
Week 4 Chinese local religions Steven Sangren, "Dialectics of Alienation: Individuals and Collectivities in Chinese Religion" in Chinese Sociologics: An Anthropological Account of the Role of Alienation in Social Reproduction, pg. 69-95
Week 5 Legalism and political culture 蕭建生《中國文明的反思》,第二章“偉大時代的悲劇:春秋戰國與專制主義的勝利” pg. 37-75 and 寧可 “中國封建社會的專制主義中央集權制度
Week 6 The rise of cultural critique 魯迅 《狂人日記》and selections from 秦晖《走出帝制
Week 7 Mid-session exam  
Week 8 NO CLASS  
Week 9 The Maoist vision of culture 毛澤東 《在延安文藝座談會上的講話》
Week 10 The Cultural Revolution: the pinnacle of Maoism 高臯與嚴傢其《文化大革命十年史》, 第三與第四章,“紅衛兵運動和個人崇拜熱潮的興起”以及“向舊世界宣戰”
Week 11 Re-creating critique in the 1980s 劉曉波《天人合一批判》and selections from 《河殤》
Week 12 Revitalizing tradition? Selections from 胡曉明《讀經:啓蒙還是蒙昧?》 and 袁偉時《文化與中國轉型
Week 13 Final exam  

 

Policies and Procedures

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central. Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Academic Honesty Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/academic_honesty/policy.html

Assessment Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/assessment/policy_2016.html

Grade Appeal Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/gradeappeal/policy.html

Complaint Management Procedure for Students and Members of the Public http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/complaint_management/procedure.html​

Disruption to Studies Policy (in effect until Dec 4th, 2017): http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/disruption_studies/policy.html

Special Consideration Policy (in effect from Dec 4th, 2017): https://staff.mq.edu.au/work/strategy-planning-and-governance/university-policies-and-procedures/policies/special-consideration

In addition, a number of other policies can be found in the Learning and Teaching Category of Policy Central.

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/support/student_conduct/

Results

Results shown in iLearn, or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent. For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au.

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Learning Skills

Learning Skills (mq.edu.au/learningskills) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to improve your marks and take control of your study.

Student Enquiry Service

For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at ask.mq.edu.au

Equity Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

IT Help

For help with University computer systems and technology, visit http://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/information_technology/help/

When using the University's IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use of IT Resources Policy. The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network including students.

Graduate Capabilities

Discipline Specific Knowledge and Skills

Our graduates will take with them the intellectual development, depth and breadth of knowledge, scholarly understanding, and specific subject content in their chosen fields to make them competent and confident in their subject or profession. They will be able to demonstrate, where relevant, professional technical competence and meet professional standards. They will be able to articulate the structure of knowledge of their discipline, be able to adapt discipline-specific knowledge to novel situations, and be able to contribute from their discipline to inter-disciplinary solutions to problems.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • Attain a basic knowledge of Chinese culture and tradition, including Chinese philosophy, history, politics, and their evolution over time.

Assessment tasks

  • Mid-session exam
  • Final exam

Critical, Analytical and Integrative Thinking

We want our graduates to be capable of reasoning, questioning and analysing, and to integrate and synthesise learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments; to be able to critique constraints, assumptions and limitations; to be able to think independently and systemically in relation to scholarly activity, in the workplace, and in the world. We want them to have a level of scientific and information technology literacy.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Attain a basic knowledge of Chinese culture and tradition, including Chinese philosophy, history, politics, and their evolution over time.
  • Develop critical thinking and analytical skills. Students should be able to independently and critically analyse important aspects of Chinese culture, and develop a deeper understanding of the complexities of the idea of "culture."
  • Acquire general academic and communication skills, including self-awareness, interpersonal skills and working with others, skills in information gathering and management, problem-solving skills, and written and oral communication skills

Assessment tasks

  • Mid-session exam
  • Essay
  • Final exam

Creative and Innovative

Our graduates will also be capable of creative thinking and of creating knowledge. They will be imaginative and open to experience and capable of innovation at work and in the community. We want them to be engaged in applying their critical, creative thinking.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Develop critical thinking and analytical skills. Students should be able to independently and critically analyse important aspects of Chinese culture, and develop a deeper understanding of the complexities of the idea of "culture."
  • Acquire general academic and communication skills, including self-awareness, interpersonal skills and working with others, skills in information gathering and management, problem-solving skills, and written and oral communication skills

Assessment tasks

  • Attendance and participation
  • Essay

Effective Communication

We want to develop in our students the ability to communicate and convey their views in forms effective with different audiences. We want our graduates to take with them the capability to read, listen, question, gather and evaluate information resources in a variety of formats, assess, write clearly, speak effectively, and to use visual communication and communication technologies as appropriate.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • Acquire general academic and communication skills, including self-awareness, interpersonal skills and working with others, skills in information gathering and management, problem-solving skills, and written and oral communication skills

Assessment tasks

  • Attendance and participation
  • Mid-session exam
  • Essay
  • Final exam

Problem Solving and Research Capability

Our graduates should be capable of researching; of analysing, and interpreting and assessing data and information in various forms; of drawing connections across fields of knowledge; and they should be able to relate their knowledge to complex situations at work or in the world, in order to diagnose and solve problems. We want them to have the confidence to take the initiative in doing so, within an awareness of their own limitations.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Develop critical thinking and analytical skills. Students should be able to independently and critically analyse important aspects of Chinese culture, and develop a deeper understanding of the complexities of the idea of "culture."
  • Acquire general academic and communication skills, including self-awareness, interpersonal skills and working with others, skills in information gathering and management, problem-solving skills, and written and oral communication skills

Assessment tasks

  • Attendance and participation
  • Essay

About this unit

This is an introductory unit covering various aspects of Chinese culture, from philosophy to politics, and from the distant past to the tumultuous changes in culture in the 20th century. This unit is designed for students who have passed HSC Chinese for Background Speakers or who have a similar level of knowledge of Chinese. Lectures are in Mandarin or English, as are all texts. Assignments are written in Chinese. 

Classes

For lecture times and classrooms please consult the MQ Timetable website: http://www.timetables.mq.edu.au. This website will display up-to-date information on your classes and classroom locations.

Lectures

Lecture Tuesday, 3:00-4:00pm

 

Tutorials

There is one tutorial class each week which must be attended, Thursdays from 1:00-2:00pm.  Tutorial readings are to be downloaded from ilearn and must be read and reviewed before the relevant tutorial class. Discussion questions will be posted on the ilearn site.

Examinations

Important:   This unit has a mid-session and a final exam. These are the primary modes of assessment in this unit.

You are expected to present yourself for examination at the designated time and place.

The only exception to sitting an examination at the designated time is because of documented illness or unavoidable disruption. In these circumstances you may wish to consider applying for Special Consideration. Information about unavoidable disruption and the special consideration process is available under theExtension and Special Consideration section of this Unit Guide. Anyone who misses an exam and does not file an application for consideration of Disruption to Studies will receive a zero.

You are advised that it is Macquarie University policy not to set early examinations for individuals or groups of students. All students are expected to ensure that they are available until the end of the teaching semester, that is the final day of the official examination period.

Extensions and special consideration

Serious Illness and Unavoidable Disruption

If your performance has been affected as a result of serious unavoidable disruption or illness, you are advised to inform the unit convenor and tutor of the problem at the earliest possible opportunity. I cannot, however, casually approve any extensions or adjustments- I will tell you to file an application for consideration of Disruption to Studies. You must supply documentary evidence of the extended disruption in an application for consideration of Disruption to Studies. (see ask.mq.edu.au).

No assessment work will be accepted for marking unless you have submitted an application for consideration of Disruption to Studies with adequate and appropriate supporting evidence and have been granted special consideration. Please note that requests for special consideration for long term or serious reasons are not granted automatically, and are reserved for unforeseen and serious circumstances such as prolonged & chronic illness, hospitalisation or bereavement in your immediate family which have affected your performance over the course of the semester; or in cases of unavoidable disruption during the formal examination period. If you believe that you qualify for special consideration, please contact the teaching staff as soon as is practically possible and lodge the application.

Disruption to Studies process

http://ask.mq.edu.au/kb.php?record=ce7c4e38-4f82-c4d7-95b1-4e2ee8fd075f

Unit requirements and expectations

Students will be expected to:

1. Review lecture materials in lectures or ilecture prior to tutorial classes.

2. Review assigned tutorial class readings prior to tutorial classes.

3. Actively participate in tutorial classes by interacting with tutors and fellow students by discussing and answering questions based on the lecture materials and tutorial readings.

4. Complete written assignments on time and to the prescribed standards.

5. Successfully complete midterm and final tests.

6. Act with a high level of academic honesty http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/academic_honesty/policy.html

Writing and referencing

Writing a Research Paper

An excellent guide from Purdue University. There are many more guides available online.

http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/658/03/

 

 

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of Academic Student Support Services. Details of these services can be accessed at:http://www.students.mq.edu.au/support/learning_skills/

 

Research Assistance

This unit is research intensive and will require you to make the full use of university research resources of the library. Sign up for a 'library tour' in the first few weeks of uni start and discover the multiple sources of print books and journals, newspapers and electronic journal databases available through the library.

 

Writing Essays and Referencing

Based on 'Writing Essays in History', prepared by Bridget Deane, Department of Modern History June 2007.

 Writing an essay is not just about writing a narrative, biography or chronology of an event, person or period of time: It requires the construction of an argument in answer to the question posed or the problem being investigated. During research for your paper you will find that the evidence may suggest several answers to the question or problem. You will therefore form your own opinion through evaluation and analysis of sources and this will be the basis of the argument put forward in your answer.

 It is because of the emphasis on evaluation and analysis in academic writing, that it is essential to acknowledge sources used in your work through the use of a referencing system. In this unit, footnotes are required, using the Chicago referencing style (see also http://www.lib.monash.edu.au/tutorials/citing/chicago.html for more information)

 All students are expected to conform to this system in this unit guide, unless directed by the supervisor in accordance with the required style of an academic journal or publisher.

 Why reference?

It shows the person marking your work the sources that you have been accessing. It establishes that your argument is one formed by knowledge of a range of authors' opinions - use of this knowledge will make your argument stronger. It allows the reader to quickly identify and verify the sources you have used. Most importantly, it is how you recognise your intellectual debt to others.

 When to footnote

It is essential to footnote when you are making use of someone else's words, information or ideas as evidence for your argument. Failure to acknowledge this in your own work amounts to plagiarism, i.e., presenting another person's work as if it were your own. It is simply not acceptable to plagiarise, and any piece of work found to contain it will be failed automatically. For more information on MacquarieUniversity's policy on Academic Honesty Policy

 Using sources in your essays

If you use another person's ideas or information in your essay then you need to acknowledge this use through referencing. Such material may be included in the following ways:

Direct Quotation Using the author's exact words. They must be placed in quotation marks, with a footnote number at the end of the quotation.

Paraphrase (indirect quotation) Rewriting someone else's ideas in your own words. The footnote number is placed at the end of the sentence.

Summary (indirect quotation) Reference to an author's ideas or argument. Again, the footnote number is placed at the end of the sentence.

Quotations of more than forty words should be indented using single spacing, without quotation marks:

Other sources that need to be referenced:

Images, figures, tables, graphs, maps and diagrams, frame enlargements from films. Information from lectures - the lecturer's words, notes taken during the lecture, information from slides and overheads.

What does not need to be referenced:

Common knowledge - information that is general and well known, that is, in the public domain. For example, the Second World War ended in 1945. Your own ideas, arguments and visual materials.

If in doubt about whether to reference or not, ask the unit convenor for advice.

Preparing footnotes

Footnotes appear at the bottom of each relevant page of your essay, whereas endnotes are located at the end of the document.

Sometimes because of lack of space at the bottom of a page, Word will move footnotes over to the next page. Do not worry if this happens.

Titles of books, journals, etc, must be written in italics.

Punctuation and the use of capitals are important in footnotes, so pay attention to this in the examples below.

How to create a footnote using Microsoft Word

Go to the Insert menu and select Footnote (or in the 2003 version click Reference). Choose footnote.. Make sure the numbering is continuous andapplies to the whole document.

Additional material in footnotes

You are discouraged from the placing of additional material in footnotes, as this indicates lack of editing and an attempt to get round the word limit. An exception is the inclusion of a translation of material included in the main text.

Footnotes

Different sources require different formats when creating footnotes as the examples below will show, but generally you need to include the following information for an initial citation of a source:

Name of author

Title of the source

Name of the city and publisher of the source

Date of publication

Page number(s)

 

For an initial citation of:

Books

1 Simon Ryan, The Cartographic Eye: How Explorers saw Australia(Melbourne: Cambridge University Press, 1996), p.45.

Note that publication details are placed in brackets

Books with two authors

2 Christopher Bayly and Tim Harper, Forgotten Armies: The Fall of British Asia, 1941 – 1945 (CambridgeMassachusetts: The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2005), pp.30-31

Note that multiple pages are indicated with pp.

Books with three or more authors

3 R. Frankham, J.D. Ballou and D.A. Briscoe, Introduction to Conservation Genetics, (Cambridge University Press 2002) p2.

Multivolume work

4 Winston Churchill, A History of the English Speaking Peoples, vol. 2, The New World (London: Cassell, 1956), p.124.

Translation

5 Christine de Pizan, The Book of the City of Ladies, trans. R. Brown Grant (Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1999), p. 48.

Foreign Language Books

Standard conventions must be followed, although foreign language words must be italicised.

5 Qiao Liang and Wang Xiangshui, Chaoxian Zhan. Dui Quanqiuhua Shidai Zhanzheng Yu Zhanfa De Xiangding (Unrestricted Warfare. Thoughts on Warfare and Strategy in the Globalised Era). (Jiefangjun Wenyi Chubanshe (Liberation Army Arts Publishing House)Beijing 1999)p.34

Note that the publisher's name in Chinese is italicised, but the English translation of it remains un-italicised. Both are correctly observing convention.

Chapter in an edited book

6 Gareth Wiliams, 'Popular Culture and the Historians' in Making History: An Introduction to the History and Practices of a Discipline, ed. Peter Lambert and Phillipp Schofield (Abingdon: Routledge, 2004), p.260.

7 M.N. Pearson, "Pilgrims, Travellers, Tourist: the Meanings of Journeys." Australian Cultural History 10 (1991): p.127.

Journal articles (online access of printed journals)

8 Georg Iggers, "Historiography from a Global Perspective," History and Theory 43, no. 1 (2004) p.149.

Note: you must cite the author, article title and journal title in full, and not just the URL from where you accessed the article.

Electronic Journal articles

Electronic journals and other material sourced from the Internet usually do not have page numbers. Include the appropriate section or paragraph instead. eg Introduction

9. Tom Wilson, "'In the Beginning Was the Word': Social and Economic Factors in Scholarly Electronic Communication", ELVIRA Conference Keynote Paper, 1009, 10 April 1995, http://www.shef.ac.uk/~is/wilson/publications/elvira.html (accessed May 23 1999), Introduction.

Book reviews

9 Colin Seymour-Ure, review of World War II in Cartoons, by Mark Bryant, History Today, 55,no. 9 (September 2005): p.55.

Citing a source read in another source

10 Paul Keating quoted in Richard Connaughton, Japan's War on Mainland Australia 1942-1944 (London: Brassey's, 1994), p.11.

Unpublished manuscript material

11 John David Booth, Papers, 1984-1990, MLMSS7332, State Library of NSW, Sydney

Information from a lecture

12 Jane Smith, "Women Politicians of the Twentieth Century" (Lecture given at MacquarieUniversity, NSW, March 7, 2005).

13 Jane Smith, "Women Politicians of the Twentieth Century" (Lecture slide, MacquarieUniversity, NSW, March 7, 2005).

Theses and dissertations

14 Elizabeth Eggleston, "Emma Peel - Feminist Icon or Swinging 60s Chick?" (BA (Hons) thesis, BournemouthUniversity, 2002), p.12.

Internet sources

References for internet sources must give the author and/or title of the material and the URL (website address) to enable the reader to find the source easily. Provide the date on which you accessed the source online.

15 "Australians at War: First World War 1914-1918," Australian War Memorial, available from

http://www.awm.gov.au/atwar/ww1.htm (accessed 12/10/2009)

Audio-visual sources

16 Steven Spielberg, Schindler's List, (Universal Pictures, 1993)

If you are engaged in intensive film analysis it will be of great assistance to the reader of your work if you specify the chapter or minute mark.

Newspapers and magazines

17 M. Lake, "The Howard History of Australia," The Age20 August 2005, p.5.

18 Agence France-Presse, "China upholds jail term for top dissident: lawyer", Sydney Morning Herald, 11 February 2010.

http://news.smh.com.au/breaking-news-world/china-upholds-jail-term-for-top-dissident-lawyer-20100211-ntss.html

Note If you access the newspaper or magazine online you must include the URL address.

 

For unsigned articles:

18 "History with a Raw Edge," Sydney Morning HeraldNovember 10, 2003, p.12.

Images, figures, maps, etc

Every image, figure or map used should be provided with a caption naming the source of the illustration and title:

From a book:

Map: The Religious Complexion of Europe in the Period c. 1555-8

Source: Euan Cameron, The European Reformation. New YorkOxfordUniversity Press,1991.

For works of art include the name of the artist and title of the work and source:

Herbert Badham, The Swimming Enclosure, 1941. Source: State Library of NSW, Sydney

Note that these sources do not need to be included in your bibliography.

 

Second and later references

After the first, full reference of a source you can then use an abbreviated version in your footnotes or endnotes:

 

16 Simon Ryan, The Cartographic Eye; How Explorers saw Australia

(Melbourne: Cambridge University Press, 1996), p.45.

17 Ryan, p.45.

OR

When referring to a source more than once you may use ibid in your footnotes when the work is the same as the one immediately above it:

16 Simon Ryan, The Cartographic Eye; How Explorers saw Australia

(Melbourne: Cambridge University Press, 1996), p.45.

17 Ibid.

OR

When referring to a source already cited, you may use Op. Cit. in your footnotes.

16 Simon Ryan, The Cartographic Eye; How Explorers saw Australia

(Melbourne: Cambridge University Press, 1996), p.45.

17 Ibid.

18 Jones, p2

19 Ryan Op.Cit., p.45

If

There is more than one publication by the same author, use a year to indicate separate publications in second and later references:

16 Simon Ryan, The Cartographic Eye; How Explorers saw Australia

(Melbourne: Cambridge University Press, 1996), p.45.

17 Ibid.

18 Jones 1990, p2

19 Ryan Op.Cit., p.45

20 Jones 1991, pp41-42

Books with two authors

2 Bayly and Harper, p3

Books with three or more authors

3 Frankham et al, p3-4

 

Bibliography

At the end of your essay list all the books, articles and other sources in alphabetical order of author's family name. You can divide the bibliography into sections, i.e. primary and secondary sources.

Be aware of naming conventions for Chinese names. The family name is traditionally the first name written eg MAO Zedong, unless it has been reversed in the English language convention, particularly in Western academic publishing eg Zedong MAO.

 

Note that a bibliography is required in addition to footnotes. Formats used for bibliographical entries are different from those used for references.

 

Books

Ryan, Simon. The Cartographic Eye; How Explorers saw AustraliaMelbourneCambridgeUniversity Press, 1996.

 

Books with two authors

Bayly, Christopher and Harper, Tim. Forgotten Armies: The Fall of British Asia, 1941 - 1945CambridgeMassachusetts: The Belknap Press ofHarvardUniversity Press, 2005.

 

Three or more authors

Grimshaw, Patricia, MarilynLake, Ann McGrath, and Marian Quartly. Creating a Nation. Ringwood: Penguin Books Australia Ltd., 1996.

 

Multivolume work

Churchill, Winston. A History of the English Speaking Peoples. Vol. 2, The New WorldLondon: Cassell, 1956.

 

Translation

de Pizan, Christine. The Book of the City of LadiesTranslated by R. Brown Grant. Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1999.

 

Foreign Language Books

Qiao, Liang and Wang, Xiangshui. Chaoxian Zhan. Dui Quanqiuhua Shidai Zhanzheng Yu Zhanfa De Xiangding (Unrestricted Warfare. Thoughts on Warfare and Strategy in the Globalised Era). Jiefangjun Wenyi Chubanshe (Liberation Army Arts Publishing House)Beijing1999.

Note the Chinese family name convention.

Note that for the bibliographical entries for chapters, journal articles and electronic journal articles you need to include the full page range of the text. Forfootnotes just the page number is cited.

 

Chapter in an edited book

Williams, Gareth. "Popular Culture and the Historians" in Making History: An Introduction to the History and Practices of a Discipline, edited by Peter Lambert and Phillipp Schofield, Abingdon: Routledge, 2004, pp.257-268.

 

Journal articles

Pearson, M.N. "Pilgrims, Travellers, Tourist: the Meanings of Journeys." Australian Cultural History 10 (1991): pp.125-134.

 

Electronic journal articles

Iggers, Georg. "Historiography from a Global Perspective," History and Theory 43, no. 1 (2004)

http://www.blackwell.synergy.com/doi/abs: pp.146-154.

Note: you must cite the author, article title and journal title in full, and not just the URL.

 

Book reviews

Colin, Seymour-Ure. Review of World War II in Cartoons, by Mark Bryant, History Today, 55, no. 9 (September 2005): pp.55-56.

 

Source read in another source

Keating, Paul, quoted in Richard Connaughton, Japan's War on Mainland Australia 1942-1944London: Brassey's, 1994.

 

Unpublished manuscript material

John David Booth, Papers, 1984-1990, MLMSS7332, State Library of NSW, Sydney

 

Information from a lecture

Smith, Jane. "Women Politicians of the Twentieth Century." Lecture given at MacquarieUniversity, NSW, March 7, 2005.

 

Thesis and dissertations

Eggleston, Elizabeth. "Emma Peel - Feminist Icon or Swinging 60s Chick?" BA (Hons) thesis, BournemouthUniversity, 2002.

 

Internet source

"Australians at War: First World War 1914-1918." Australian War Memorial.

http://www.awm.gov.au/atwar/ww1.htm

 

Audio-visual sources

Spielberg, Steven. Schindler's List. Universal Pictures, 1993

 

Newspapers and magazines

Lake, Marilyn. "The Howard History of Australia." The AgeAugust 20, 2005.

Agence France-Presse, "China upholds jail term for top dissident: lawyer", Sydney Morning Herald, 11 February 2010.

 

For unsigned articles put the name of the newspaper first:

Sydney Morning Herald, "History with a Raw Edge," November 10, 2003.

 

 

Further information on referencing and compiling bibliographies

For further information on referencing and compiling bibliographies, including sources not mentioned here, the following books will be useful:

Jules R. Benjamin, A Student's Guide to History, 8th edition, (Boston: Bedford/St. Martins, 2001)

 

Style Manual for Authors, Editors and Printers (Canberra: AGPS,1994)

The Chicago Manual of Style, 15th edition, (Chicago:University of Chicago Press, 2003) Chicago-Style Citation Quick Guide available online at

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

You can also access Citation and Style Guides through the Macquarie University Library Website at http://www.library.mq.edu.au/readyref/cites.html

Changes since First Published

Date Description
25/07/2017 Updated delivery and resources section, updated consultation hours