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CHN 209 – Traditional Chinese Culture and Society II (Background Speakers)

2017 – S2 Day

General Information

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Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit Convenor
A/Prof. Shirley Chan
Contact via shirley.chan@mq.edu.au
AHH
Thursday 11:00am-12:00pm, 3:00pm-4:00pm by appointment
Credit points Credit points
3
Prerequisites Prerequisites
Permission by Special Approval
Corequisites Corequisites
Co-badged status Co-badged status
Unit description Unit description
This unit is a continuation of CHN208. The unit is for students who are Chinese background speakers or those who possess a similar level of Chinese to the HSC Chinese for Background Speakers.

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at http://students.mq.edu.au/student_admin/enrolmentguide/academicdates/

Learning Outcomes

  1. Enhanced knowledge of traditional Chinese culture and society
  2. Improved understanding of the key values and practices in shaping Chinese culture, people and their ways of living
  3. Familiarity and facility with concepts, themes and theoretical perspectives on traditional Chinese culture
  4. Capacity for analytical and critical thinking as well as appreciation of, and respect for cultural diversities
  5. Ability to engage in independent and reflective learning through assessing and responding to ideas
  6. Improved ability to work in cooperative groups on key issues in Chinese Studies and communicate findings to fellow students

General Assessment Information

Indicative examples of assessment tasks will be available on iLearn.

Extensions and Special Consideration

Short Term Extensions

Requests for assignment extensions due to unavoidable and unforseen circumstances of less than three days duration (eg short term illness or misadventure) must be made to the convenor via ask.mq.edu.au before the due date if possible, or immediately after the disruption. Approvals of extensions must be noted on the assignment cover sheet.

Assignments that are handed in later than the due date, where no extension has been granted, or are handed in later than the extension date without being granted further extension or special consideration will be penalised.

Late submissions will be penalised by 5% for each day (including weekends) the assignment is late. No assessment tasks will be accepted after corrections and feedback has been provided to the class. Assessment tasks handed in early will not be marked and returned before the due date.

Serious Illness and Unavoidable Disruption

If your performance has been affected for a period of 3 days or more as a result of serious unavoidable disruption or illness, you are advised to inform the unit convenor and tutor of the problem at the earliest possible opportunity. You must supply documentary evidence of the extended disruption and submit an Application for Special Consideration via ask.mq.edu.au. (see below).

No assessment work will be accepted for marking beyond Week 14 unless you have submitted an Application for Special Consideration via ask.mq.edu.au with adequate and appropriate supporting evidence and have been granted special consideration. Please note that requests for special consideration for long term or serious reasons are not granted automatically, and are reserved for unforeseen and serious circumstances such as prolonged & chronic illness, hospitalisation or bereavement in your immediate family which have affected your performance over the course of the semester; or in cases of unavoidable disruption or misadventure during the formal examination period. If you believe that you qualify for special consideration, please contact the teaching staff as soon as is practically possible and lodge the application.

Special Consideration Policy

http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/special_consideration/policy.html

Required and recommended resources

Readings in research and translation methodologies, see also:

Writing a Research Paper

An excellent guide from Purdue University

http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/658/03/

There are many more guides available online as well as in the library.

The university runs a series of workshop on learning skills and completing assignments. Please check up the details via the following link:

http://www.students.mq.edu.au/support/learning_skills/undergraduate/workshops/

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Due
Class participation/discussion 20% Weeks1-13
Group Presentation and Report 35% Weeks 4-12
Final Test 45% TBA

Class participation/discussion

Due: Weeks1-13
Weighting: 20%

Participation will be marked on attendance, willingness to participate in class discussion, preparation and performance of reading and responding to questions. This is not a simple attendance mark. Marks will not be awarded for attendance, meaning that it is possible to attend every class and still not receive any participation marks. Participation marks are based in your contributions to tutorial discussions. Students are expected to be well prepared in order to participate in class discussion – this will ensure good use of class time as well as improving your learning skills and sharing your knowledge with others.Class attendance and participation is expected and will be part of the assessment. This means you not only come and sign in the class but come well prepared and participate in class discussion. You need to read the assigned reading material and think about the topics and share your thought with others. Your marks for class attendance and performance will be determined by

a)    Whether you attend class regularly or not; b)    How much effort you have taken to prepare for the class; c)    How actively you participate in class discussion, d) Whether you participate online discussion when required by the unit and e)  How helpful your comments are on the work of our fellow students.

This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:

  • Enhanced knowledge of traditional Chinese culture and society
  • Improved understanding of the key values and practices in shaping Chinese culture, people and their ways of living
  • Familiarity and facility with concepts, themes and theoretical perspectives on traditional Chinese culture
  • Capacity for analytical and critical thinking as well as appreciation of, and respect for cultural diversities
  • Ability to engage in independent and reflective learning through assessing and responding to ideas
  • Improved ability to work in cooperative groups on key issues in Chinese Studies and communicate findings to fellow students

This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Enhanced knowledge of traditional Chinese culture and society
  • Improved understanding of the key values and practices in shaping Chinese culture, people and their ways of living
  • Familiarity and facility with concepts, themes and theoretical perspectives on traditional Chinese culture
  • Capacity for analytical and critical thinking as well as appreciation of, and respect for cultural diversities
  • Ability to engage in independent and reflective learning through assessing and responding to ideas
  • Improved ability to work in cooperative groups on key issues in Chinese Studies and communicate findings to fellow students

Group Presentation and Report

Due: Weeks 4-12
Weighting: 35%

There will be one group (two-person) presentation.  In the beginning of the semester, you will be asked to choose a tutorial topic.  You are expected to lead a discussion on your chosen topic for that week. Your oral presentation is expected to be 20 minutes in length (no more than 10 min each person).  You have to finish your presentation within the time limit or marks will be deducted. The group project should reflect the collective efforts of every member of your group.  You should be prepared for the rest of the class to raise questions.  You will need to prepare a 2 page report which needs to be posted on the iLearn in the discussion forum AND the Turnitin at least a week before the actual presentation,  so the rest of the class can read and prepare for the discussion. The written report and the oral presentation makes 15% and 20% respectively.

- A 2 page report (15%)

The report will marked on coherence, critical analysis, clarity and argument.

- Actual presentation + visual aides, eg., PPT slides (20%)

In preparing to lead discussion, you may wish to consider the following questions: 

1)      What are the readings about? 

2)      What are the main points being argued? 

3)      What evidence is marshalled to support the author’s argument? 

4)      Do you agree/disagree with the arguments put forward in the readings? 

5)      What did you find most interesting about the topic or the reading? 

6)      How does this discussion contribute to your understanding/knowledge of Chinese culture and society? 

每周课堂演讲以及演讲报告可参考的相关问题: 

1)阅读材料的内容是什么? 

2)阅读材料的主要观点是什么? 

3)哪些证据可以支持作者的观点? 

4)你是否赞成阅读材料中所提出的观点? 

5)你认为阅读材料或相关论点中最吸引你的部分是什么? 

6)该论点或相关材料如何帮你了解中国文化和中国社会? 

 

 

This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:

  • Enhanced knowledge of traditional Chinese culture and society
  • Improved understanding of the key values and practices in shaping Chinese culture, people and their ways of living
  • Familiarity and facility with concepts, themes and theoretical perspectives on traditional Chinese culture
  • Capacity for analytical and critical thinking as well as appreciation of, and respect for cultural diversities
  • Ability to engage in independent and reflective learning through assessing and responding to ideas
  • Improved ability to work in cooperative groups on key issues in Chinese Studies and communicate findings to fellow students

This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Enhanced knowledge of traditional Chinese culture and society

Final Test

Due: TBA
Weighting: 45%

There will a 1 hour final test (time and venue TBA). It will be in form of short answer questions.

You marks will be determined by but not limited to:

a) Grasp of the task and focus. Are you really answering the question(s)? Is there a well-defined framework or scope of argumentation?

b) Knowledge of content and argumentation. For example, is there a well-developed argument? Does your answers reflect a clear, insightful knowledge of the topic in a clear and critical analysis?

c)  Creativity and judgement.  Do you show good judgement in the selection or arrangement of materials? Is there an evidence to support your argument?

d) Communication and presentation. Does your work show a mastery of the technical aspects of academic writing?  

 

This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:

  • Enhanced knowledge of traditional Chinese culture and society
  • Improved understanding of the key values and practices in shaping Chinese culture, people and their ways of living
  • Familiarity and facility with concepts, themes and theoretical perspectives on traditional Chinese culture
  • Capacity for analytical and critical thinking as well as appreciation of, and respect for cultural diversities
  • Ability to engage in independent and reflective learning through assessing and responding to ideas
  • Improved ability to work in cooperative groups on key issues in Chinese Studies and communicate findings to fellow students

 

 

 


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Enhanced knowledge of traditional Chinese culture and society
  • Improved understanding of the key values and practices in shaping Chinese culture, people and their ways of living
  • Familiarity and facility with concepts, themes and theoretical perspectives on traditional Chinese culture
  • Capacity for analytical and critical thinking as well as appreciation of, and respect for cultural diversities
  • Ability to engage in independent and reflective learning through assessing and responding to ideas
  • Improved ability to work in cooperative groups on key issues in Chinese Studies and communicate findings to fellow students

Delivery and Resources

About this unit

Students admitted to this course are expected to have a level of Chinese equivalent to HSC Chinese for Background Speakers. We will come across readings in English as well as Chinese from time to time and students are expected to be able to read and write in good Chinese and English.

Students are encouraged to attend all classes and tutorials are compulsory with tutorial discussion strongly emphasizing student engagement and class discussion. To benefit the most from the course, students are required to be active, responsible participants in their own learning, and to develop indpendent analytical and research skills in Chinese culture and society by reading and analysing both Chinese and English sources which should not be confined to the recommended reading list. Students should complete assessments on time by following instructions. Essays and assignments will be written in Chinese although class discussions will be in Chinese and explained in English if necessary. Students should check their iLearn unit regularly for announcements and resource information posted by the convenor. Students should check their university email account regularly. It is the responsibility of students to be aware and up to date with unit news and announcements.

TECHNOLOGY USED AND REQUIRED

Standard requirements include a computer and internet access to interact with the teaching materials on iLearn.

Login is via: https://ilearn.mq.edu.au/

Is my unit in iLearn?: http://help.ilearn.mq.edu.au/unitsonline/ to check when your online unit will become available.

Technology

Students are required to have regular access to a computer and the internet. Mobile devices alone are not sufficient.

For students attending classes on campus we strongly encourage that you bring along your own laptop computer, ready to work with activities in your online unit. The preferred operating system is Windows 10.

Students are required to access the online unit in iLearn by the end of Week 1 and follow any relevant instructions and links for downloads that may be required. If applicable, students are required to download the relevant language package prior to Week 2.

Please contact your course convenor before the end of Week 1 if you do not have a suitable laptop (or tablet) for in-class use.

Recommended Readings:

Albany: State University of New York Press. 1991.

Allinson, Robert. (ed.) Understanding the Chinese Mind. Hong Kong: Oxford University Press. 1990.

Graham, A. C. Disputers of the Tao: Philosophical Argument in Ancient China. Open Court. 1999. 

葛瑞漢,《論道者:中國古代哲學辯論》。中國社會出版社。2002.

Gernet, Jacques. A History of Chinese Civilization. [Reprint] Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 1987.

謝和耐. 中國社會史. 耿昇譯. 江蘇人民出版社. 1996.

Henderson, John, B. The Development and Decline of Chinese Cosmology. Columbia University Press. 1984. 

Kern, Martin. Text and Ritual in Early China. University of Washington Press. 2000.

Major, John.Myth, Cosmology, and the Origins of Chinese Science.Journal of Chinese Philosophy 5 (1):1-20. 

Moore, Charles. The Chinese Mind: Essentials of Chinese Philosophy and Culture. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press. 1967.

Ralph Weber (2005). Oneness and Particularity in Chinese Natural Cosmology: The Notion Tianrenheyi.Asian Philosophy 15 (2):191 – 205.

Yang Rubin楊儒賓. Energeia and Body in Ancient China中國古代思想中的氣論與身體觀. Taipei: Juliu Tushu. 1997.

You will find some of the URL links containing materials on Chinese texts, history, archaeology, art, culture extremely handy. Among these are:

http://ctext.org/

http://www.chinapage.com/

http://www.princeton.edu/~classbib/

This pointer will bring up the introduction page of the Classical Chinese Historiography for Chinese History. Scroll down to get to the table of contents. The display includes full-style Chinese characters (fanti zi). The most useful section for this course is section 9: Select Bibliography of Chinese Classics and Literature in Translation with Recent Related Histories; Section 10: Selected English Bibliography For Chinese Civilization: A Brief Historical Survey. You can reach this by using the contents page.

General information about improving your learning skills

Learning Skills are services provided by the university which can support you as you tackle the demands of your courses.  The services help students understand university expectations and to develop key reading, writing and critical thinking skills. Make good use of these services will benefit your study.

The free services include:

  • workshops
  • online resources
  • individual assistance (face-to-face and via email).

Learn more about the services:

http://www.students.mq.edu.au/support/learning_skills/

Library Databases

The library databases offer access to thousands of academic journal articles on all relevant subject areas.  Make a point of searching these databases for scholarly articles for sources of information for assignments.  The library enquiry desk is a good point of assistance in the use of these databases.  You can also the ‘Ask a Librarian’ service by phone or live chat. http://www.mq.edu.au/on_campus/library/

Classes

For lecture times and classrooms please consult the MQ Timetable website: http://www.timetables.mq.edu.au. This website will display up-to-date information on your classes and classroom locations. There is one hour lecture and one hour tutorial for this unit.

Electronic Copy via Turnitin.com

Macquarie University subscribes to the 'Turn It In' plagiarism detection system. All students will be required to submit all of their written work through this system. See Assessment Submission for details.

Assessment Marking Rubrics 

Assessment Marking Rubrics are required for each assessment task (see Assessment Tasks in General).  They can be downloaded from iLearn.

Unit Schedule

 

 

Lecture

Tutorial readings

/discussions

Assessment

Week 1

 Introduction

Characteristics of Chinese Culture

 

 

Class participation/discussion

Week 2

Confucianism and Chinese Culture

Graham,The Disputors of Dao

 

Class participation/discussion

Week 3

Daoism: Laozi

Graham, The Disputors of Dao

Class participation/discussion

Week 4

 

Daoism: Zhuangzi and Chinese Culture

 

Graham, The Disputors of Dao

 

Class participation/discussion

Group presentation

Week 5

Qi and Body

 

Yang,Qi and Body

Class participation/discussion

Group presentation

Week 6

Text and Ritual (1)

Kern,Text and Ritual

Class participation/discussion

Group presentation

Week 7

Text and Ritual (2)

Kern, Text and Ritual

Class participation/discussion

Group presentation

Essay draft due this Friday

Week 8

Beauty and Aesthetics

 

Group project/presentation Class participation/discussion

Week 9

The Development and Decline of Chinese Cosmology (1)

Henderson, The Development and Decline of Chinese Cosmology

Class participation/discussion

Group presentation

Week 10

The Development and Decline of Chinese Cosmology (2)

Henderson,The Development and Decline of Chinese Cosmology

 

Group presentation

Class participation/discussion

Week 11

Writing and Authority in Early China (1)

 

 

Lewis, Writing and Authority in Early China

 

Group presentation

Class participation/discussion

Week 12

Writing and Authority in Early China (2) 

 

Lewis, Writing and Authority in Early China

Class participation/discussion

Essay due this Friday

Group presentation

Week 13

Revision 

 

Feedback/evaluation

 Class participation/discussion

Essay due this Friday

Group presentation

Learning and Teaching Activities

Other Unit requirements and expectations

Students will be expected to: 1. Review lecture materials in lectures or ilecture prior to tutorial classes. 2. Review assigned tutorial class readings prior to tutorial classes. 3. Actively participate in tutorial classes by interacting with tutors and fellow students by discussing and answering questions based on the lecture materials and tutorial readings. 4. Complete all assessment tasks on time and to the prescribed standards. 5. Successfully complete all assessment tasks 6. Act with a high level of academic honesty http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/academic_honesty/policy.html

Policies and Procedures

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central. Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Academic Honesty Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/academic_honesty/policy.html

Assessment Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/assessment/policy_2016.html

Grade Appeal Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/gradeappeal/policy.html

Complaint Management Procedure for Students and Members of the Public http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/complaint_management/procedure.html​

Disruption to Studies Policy http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/disruption_studies/policy.html The Disruption to Studies Policy is effective from March 3 2014 and replaces the Special Consideration Policy.

In addition, a number of other policies can be found in the Learning and Teaching Category of Policy Central.

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/support/student_conduct/

Results

Results shown in iLearn, or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent. For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au.

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Learning Skills

Learning Skills (mq.edu.au/learningskills) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to improve your marks and take control of your study.

Student Enquiry Service

For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at ask.mq.edu.au

Equity Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

IT Help

For help with University computer systems and technology, visit http://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/information_technology/help/

When using the University's IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use of IT Resources Policy. The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network including students.

Graduate Capabilities

Discipline Specific Knowledge and Skills

Our graduates will take with them the intellectual development, depth and breadth of knowledge, scholarly understanding, and specific subject content in their chosen fields to make them competent and confident in their subject or profession. They will be able to demonstrate, where relevant, professional technical competence and meet professional standards. They will be able to articulate the structure of knowledge of their discipline, be able to adapt discipline-specific knowledge to novel situations, and be able to contribute from their discipline to inter-disciplinary solutions to problems.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Enhanced knowledge of traditional Chinese culture and society
  • Improved understanding of the key values and practices in shaping Chinese culture, people and their ways of living
  • Familiarity and facility with concepts, themes and theoretical perspectives on traditional Chinese culture
  • Capacity for analytical and critical thinking as well as appreciation of, and respect for cultural diversities
  • Ability to engage in independent and reflective learning through assessing and responding to ideas
  • Improved ability to work in cooperative groups on key issues in Chinese Studies and communicate findings to fellow students

Assessment tasks

  • Class participation/discussion
  • Group Presentation and Report
  • Final Test

Critical, Analytical and Integrative Thinking

We want our graduates to be capable of reasoning, questioning and analysing, and to integrate and synthesise learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments; to be able to critique constraints, assumptions and limitations; to be able to think independently and systemically in relation to scholarly activity, in the workplace, and in the world. We want them to have a level of scientific and information technology literacy.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Enhanced knowledge of traditional Chinese culture and society
  • Improved understanding of the key values and practices in shaping Chinese culture, people and their ways of living
  • Familiarity and facility with concepts, themes and theoretical perspectives on traditional Chinese culture
  • Capacity for analytical and critical thinking as well as appreciation of, and respect for cultural diversities
  • Ability to engage in independent and reflective learning through assessing and responding to ideas
  • Improved ability to work in cooperative groups on key issues in Chinese Studies and communicate findings to fellow students

Assessment tasks

  • Class participation/discussion
  • Group Presentation and Report
  • Final Test

Creative and Innovative

Our graduates will also be capable of creative thinking and of creating knowledge. They will be imaginative and open to experience and capable of innovation at work and in the community. We want them to be engaged in applying their critical, creative thinking.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Enhanced knowledge of traditional Chinese culture and society
  • Improved understanding of the key values and practices in shaping Chinese culture, people and their ways of living
  • Capacity for analytical and critical thinking as well as appreciation of, and respect for cultural diversities
  • Ability to engage in independent and reflective learning through assessing and responding to ideas
  • Improved ability to work in cooperative groups on key issues in Chinese Studies and communicate findings to fellow students

Assessment tasks

  • Class participation/discussion
  • Group Presentation and Report
  • Final Test

Effective Communication

We want to develop in our students the ability to communicate and convey their views in forms effective with different audiences. We want our graduates to take with them the capability to read, listen, question, gather and evaluate information resources in a variety of formats, assess, write clearly, speak effectively, and to use visual communication and communication technologies as appropriate.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Enhanced knowledge of traditional Chinese culture and society
  • Capacity for analytical and critical thinking as well as appreciation of, and respect for cultural diversities
  • Ability to engage in independent and reflective learning through assessing and responding to ideas
  • Improved ability to work in cooperative groups on key issues in Chinese Studies and communicate findings to fellow students

Assessment tasks

  • Class participation/discussion
  • Group Presentation and Report
  • Final Test

Engaged and Ethical Local and Global citizens

As local citizens our graduates will be aware of indigenous perspectives and of the nation's historical context. They will be engaged with the challenges of contemporary society and with knowledge and ideas. We want our graduates to have respect for diversity, to be open-minded, sensitive to others and inclusive, and to be open to other cultures and perspectives: they should have a level of cultural literacy. Our graduates should be aware of disadvantage and social justice, and be willing to participate to help create a wiser and better society.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Enhanced knowledge of traditional Chinese culture and society
  • Improved understanding of the key values and practices in shaping Chinese culture, people and their ways of living
  • Familiarity and facility with concepts, themes and theoretical perspectives on traditional Chinese culture
  • Ability to engage in independent and reflective learning through assessing and responding to ideas
  • Improved ability to work in cooperative groups on key issues in Chinese Studies and communicate findings to fellow students

Assessment tasks

  • Class participation/discussion
  • Group Presentation and Report
  • Final Test

Socially and Environmentally Active and Responsible

We want our graduates to be aware of and have respect for self and others; to be able to work with others as a leader and a team player; to have a sense of connectedness with others and country; and to have a sense of mutual obligation. Our graduates should be informed and active participants in moving society towards sustainability.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Enhanced knowledge of traditional Chinese culture and society
  • Ability to engage in independent and reflective learning through assessing and responding to ideas
  • Improved ability to work in cooperative groups on key issues in Chinese Studies and communicate findings to fellow students

Assessment tasks

  • Class participation/discussion
  • Group Presentation and Report
  • Final Test

Capable of Professional and Personal Judgement and Initiative

We want our graduates to have emotional intelligence and sound interpersonal skills and to demonstrate discernment and common sense in their professional and personal judgement. They will exercise initiative as needed. They will be capable of risk assessment, and be able to handle ambiguity and complexity, enabling them to be adaptable in diverse and changing environments.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Improved understanding of the key values and practices in shaping Chinese culture, people and their ways of living
  • Familiarity and facility with concepts, themes and theoretical perspectives on traditional Chinese culture
  • Capacity for analytical and critical thinking as well as appreciation of, and respect for cultural diversities
  • Ability to engage in independent and reflective learning through assessing and responding to ideas
  • Improved ability to work in cooperative groups on key issues in Chinese Studies and communicate findings to fellow students

Assessment tasks

  • Class participation/discussion
  • Group Presentation and Report
  • Final Test

Commitment to Continuous Learning

Our graduates will have enquiring minds and a literate curiosity which will lead them to pursue knowledge for its own sake. They will continue to pursue learning in their careers and as they participate in the world. They will be capable of reflecting on their experiences and relationships with others and the environment, learning from them, and growing - personally, professionally and socially.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Enhanced knowledge of traditional Chinese culture and society
  • Improved understanding of the key values and practices in shaping Chinese culture, people and their ways of living
  • Familiarity and facility with concepts, themes and theoretical perspectives on traditional Chinese culture
  • Capacity for analytical and critical thinking as well as appreciation of, and respect for cultural diversities
  • Ability to engage in independent and reflective learning through assessing and responding to ideas

Assessment tasks

  • Class participation/discussion
  • Group Presentation and Report
  • Final Test

Problem Solving and Research Capability

Our graduates should be capable of researching; of analysing, and interpreting and assessing data and information in various forms; of drawing connections across fields of knowledge; and they should be able to relate their knowledge to complex situations at work or in the world, in order to diagnose and solve problems. We want them to have the confidence to take the initiative in doing so, within an awareness of their own limitations.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Enhanced knowledge of traditional Chinese culture and society
  • Improved understanding of the key values and practices in shaping Chinese culture, people and their ways of living
  • Familiarity and facility with concepts, themes and theoretical perspectives on traditional Chinese culture
  • Capacity for analytical and critical thinking as well as appreciation of, and respect for cultural diversities
  • Ability to engage in independent and reflective learning through assessing and responding to ideas
  • Improved ability to work in cooperative groups on key issues in Chinese Studies and communicate findings to fellow students

Assessment tasks

  • Class participation/discussion
  • Group Presentation and Report
  • Final Test

General Assessment Information

Extensions and Special Consideration

Short Term Extensions

Requests for assignment extensions due to unavoidable and unforseen circumstances of less than three days duration (eg short term illness or misadventure) must be made to the unit convenor before the due date if possible, or immediately after the disruption. Approvals of extensions must be noted on the assignment. Note that other assessment commitments will not be considered grounds for an extension.

Assignments that are handed in later than the due date, where no extension has been granted, or are handed in later than the extension date without being granted further extension or special consideration will be penalised.

Late submission of the assessment will result in a penalty of 5% of the total value of the task towards unit assessment each day (including weekends). The assessment will not be marked after a period of five calendar days of non-submission.

Serious Illness and Unavoidable Disruption

If your performance has been affected for a period of 3 days or more as a result of serious unavoidable disruption or illness, you are advised to inform the unit convenor and tutor of the problem at the earliest possible opportunity. You must supply documentary evidence of the extended disruption and submit an Application for Special Consideration. (see below).

No assessment work will be accepted for marking 1 week after the submission date unless you have submitted an Application for Special Consideration with adequate and appropriate supporting evidence and have been granted special consideration. Please note that requests for special consideration for long term or serious reasons are not granted automatically, and are reserved for unforeseen and serious circumstances such as prolonged & chronic illness, hospitalisation or bereavement in your immediate family which have affected your performance over the course of the semester; or in cases of unavoidable disruption or misadventure during the formal examination period. If you believe that you qualify for special consideration, please contact the teaching staff as soon as is practically possible and lodge the application.

Special Consideration Policy

https://students.mq.edu.au/study/my-study-program/special-consideration/disruption-to-studies