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IRPG840 – The International System

2017 – S2 Day

General Information

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Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit Convenor
Dr Govand Azeez
Level 2 The Australian Hearing Hub
TBA
Credit points Credit points
4
Prerequisites Prerequisites
Admission to MIntRel or PGDipIntRel or MIntCommMIntRel or MIntBusMIntRel or MIntRelMIntTrdeComLaw or MTransInterMIntRel or MAppAnth or MDevCult or MPPP or MIntPubDip or MGlobalHlthDevStud or GradCertPP or GradDipPP or GradCertIntRel or GradDipIntRel or MDevStud
Corequisites Corequisites
Co-badged status Co-badged status
Unit description Unit description
This unit provides an introductory overview of global politics focusing on the changing role of sovereign states and the international state system from a world historical perspective and in the context of globalisation. The unit examines different forms of international systems, including empires; issues such as war, peace and diplomacy; ideas about culture, world order and international society, and current developments in globalisation and regionalisation.

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at http://students.mq.edu.au/student_admin/enrolmentguide/academicdates/

Learning Outcomes

  1. LEARNING OUTCOMES All academic programmes at Macquarie seek to develop graduate capabilities. These are: 1. Discipline-specific knowledge and skills; 2. Critical, analytical and integrative thinking; 3. Problem-solving and research capability 4. Creative and innovative; 5. Effective communication; 6. Engaged and ethical local and global citizens; 7. Socially and environmentally active and responsible; 8. Capable of professional and personal judgement and initiative; 9. Commitment to continuous learning. Note: The numbers listed at the end of each Learning Outcome indicate how it is aligned with the Graduate Capabilities. The learning outcomes of this unit are (link to graduate capabilities in brackets): A. Students will gain an awareness and are expected to develop an understanding of the history, dynamics and mechanisms of the international system [1, 6]; B. Students are expected to develop an ability to critically examine key issues and debates that are important in the field [1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9]; C. Students are expected to develop an ability to form considered arguments and views in relation to key debates and issues in the field [1, 2, 6, 7, 8]; D. In preparing for their written assignments, students are expected to develop independent research skills [2, 3]; and E. Students are expected to acquire the skills necessary to communicate their knowledge and arguments through in-class presentations, tutorial discussions and written assignments [2, 5].

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Due
Class participation 10% November 6
In-Class Exam 40% Week 7 11th of September
Major Essay 50% Week 11 26th of October

Class participation

Due: November 6
Weighting: 10%

 

All students are expected to do the required reading for each week in preparation for the lectures and seminars. Active and informed participation is expected in each week’s seminar from all students.

External students will have the opportunity to share their thoughts on each week topic through posting comments on a forum on blackboard; a specific question will be posted to start the discussion each week and this will correspond to the 10% class participation.

 


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • LEARNING OUTCOMES All academic programmes at Macquarie seek to develop graduate capabilities. These are: 1. Discipline-specific knowledge and skills; 2. Critical, analytical and integrative thinking; 3. Problem-solving and research capability 4. Creative and innovative; 5. Effective communication; 6. Engaged and ethical local and global citizens; 7. Socially and environmentally active and responsible; 8. Capable of professional and personal judgement and initiative; 9. Commitment to continuous learning. Note: The numbers listed at the end of each Learning Outcome indicate how it is aligned with the Graduate Capabilities. The learning outcomes of this unit are (link to graduate capabilities in brackets): A. Students will gain an awareness and are expected to develop an understanding of the history, dynamics and mechanisms of the international system [1, 6]; B. Students are expected to develop an ability to critically examine key issues and debates that are important in the field [1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9]; C. Students are expected to develop an ability to form considered arguments and views in relation to key debates and issues in the field [1, 2, 6, 7, 8]; D. In preparing for their written assignments, students are expected to develop independent research skills [2, 3]; and E. Students are expected to acquire the skills necessary to communicate their knowledge and arguments through in-class presentations, tutorial discussions and written assignments [2, 5].

In-Class Exam

Due: Week 7 11th of September
Weighting: 40%

For the in-class exam students will be expected to write an essay. The exam question will be based on the material covered in the first 6 weeks of the course. The test will take place in week 7 during the lecture (11th of September). The students will have an hour to complete the exam. This is an open book exam but students will only be allowed to bring 15 pages of A4 notes. No electronic devices (laptops, tablets, kindles, phones, etc.)  will be allowed. No exceptions will be made in this regard. 

External students will complete the exam online. These students will have 1hr to complete the exam from the moment of opening the link. The link will be available from Monday the 11th (after the lecture) to the 15th of September (11.59 pm AEST). Note: students will only be able to log in once. 


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • LEARNING OUTCOMES All academic programmes at Macquarie seek to develop graduate capabilities. These are: 1. Discipline-specific knowledge and skills; 2. Critical, analytical and integrative thinking; 3. Problem-solving and research capability 4. Creative and innovative; 5. Effective communication; 6. Engaged and ethical local and global citizens; 7. Socially and environmentally active and responsible; 8. Capable of professional and personal judgement and initiative; 9. Commitment to continuous learning. Note: The numbers listed at the end of each Learning Outcome indicate how it is aligned with the Graduate Capabilities. The learning outcomes of this unit are (link to graduate capabilities in brackets): A. Students will gain an awareness and are expected to develop an understanding of the history, dynamics and mechanisms of the international system [1, 6]; B. Students are expected to develop an ability to critically examine key issues and debates that are important in the field [1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9]; C. Students are expected to develop an ability to form considered arguments and views in relation to key debates and issues in the field [1, 2, 6, 7, 8]; D. In preparing for their written assignments, students are expected to develop independent research skills [2, 3]; and E. Students are expected to acquire the skills necessary to communicate their knowledge and arguments through in-class presentations, tutorial discussions and written assignments [2, 5].

Major Essay

Due: Week 11 26th of October
Weighting: 50%

ASSESSMENT

Students will be assessed as follows:

The major essay is due Thursday 26th of October (4.00 pm). The essay length is 2800 words. 

Late Penalties: note that late papers will receive a penalty of 3% per day.

Other Penalties: Word limit of 10% above and below allowed. Anything less than 2000 or more (2800+10%) will be penalised accordingly. The word limit includes footnotes and bibliography. 

Format Requirements

  • Font size: 12 Font: Times New Roman
  • Spacing: 1.5  
  • Title Page: Each assignment should have a cover page with the essay title written on it in full, your name.
  • Document title: – Question number [X], LAST NAME, First Name. This will help with marking and returning your papers efficiently.
  • Referencing: Chicago 16th Footnote
  • Sources: A minimum of 12 academic sources (academic books and journals, not including websites) must be referenced. Failure to follow this stipulation will result in a penalty of up to 20%. 

Questions:

1. How can we explain the relationship between power and the international system today? 

2. Which theoretical perspective offers a better explanation for examining and making sense of the current global political order?

3. Critics of the current order have long argued that the synthesis of capitalism and the state in the hands of a class or "powerful elite"  will inevitably lead civilisation to destruction (mass inequality, environmental crises, catastrophic wars, etc.) and "barbarism" (chronic state of apathy, excessive individualism, commodification of life, chauvinism, tribalism, xenophobia, etc) . Examine and interrogate the accuracy of this argument. 

4. Does world-systems analysis provide a persuasive explanation for the disparities in wealth and power in the current global order? What are the major criticisms of this approach and, are they valid?

5. What role does identity (gender, race, culture) play in determining and shaping global politics today? 

 

Submission of Essays

All essays are to be submitted on Thursday 26th of October (4.00 pm) via turn-it-in on the ilearn website. 

There will be strictly NO extensions on submission deadlines for essays other than on certified medical grounds. Late submissions of essays will be penalised at the rate of 3% a day. For example, if you submit your essay 3 days late, and if the paper would have normally been awarded a 75 (out of 100), then 9 marks will be deducted, resulting in 66 as the final grade for the paper.

All work submitted for this course will be graded according to the guidelines issued by the Department of Modern History, Politics and International Relations which are attached at the end of this course guide. 


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • LEARNING OUTCOMES All academic programmes at Macquarie seek to develop graduate capabilities. These are: 1. Discipline-specific knowledge and skills; 2. Critical, analytical and integrative thinking; 3. Problem-solving and research capability 4. Creative and innovative; 5. Effective communication; 6. Engaged and ethical local and global citizens; 7. Socially and environmentally active and responsible; 8. Capable of professional and personal judgement and initiative; 9. Commitment to continuous learning. Note: The numbers listed at the end of each Learning Outcome indicate how it is aligned with the Graduate Capabilities. The learning outcomes of this unit are (link to graduate capabilities in brackets): A. Students will gain an awareness and are expected to develop an understanding of the history, dynamics and mechanisms of the international system [1, 6]; B. Students are expected to develop an ability to critically examine key issues and debates that are important in the field [1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9]; C. Students are expected to develop an ability to form considered arguments and views in relation to key debates and issues in the field [1, 2, 6, 7, 8]; D. In preparing for their written assignments, students are expected to develop independent research skills [2, 3]; and E. Students are expected to acquire the skills necessary to communicate their knowledge and arguments through in-class presentations, tutorial discussions and written assignments [2, 5].

Delivery and Resources

This course has 1x 2hr Lecture each week on Mondays from 9.00-11.00am. Students also attend 1x 1hr seminar as timetabled. The class locations and times are as follows:

The first lecture is on July 31st. The first tutorial will be held on Monday July 31st.

Lectures: Monday 9.00 am -11.00 am in Room E3B-217 

Tutorial 1: Monday 11.00 am -12.00 pm in Room E3B-217 

Tutorial 2: Monday 1.00 pm -2.00 pm in Room W5C213

Each week required readings will be set from a variety of journal articles, research reports or news articles. There is no set text book or course reader for this subject. 

Unit Schedule

Week 1 July 31st Introduction to the course and preliminary remarks. 
Week 2 August 7 Introducing the International System
Week 3 August 14 The International System through the Problem Solving Theories : Mercantilism, Liberalism and Neoliberalism
Week 4 August 21 The International System through the Critical Theories: Marxism, Dependency and World Systems Theory
Week 5 August 28 Creating the International System Part 1: 1492-1815
Week 6 September 4 Creating the International System Part 2: 1815-1945
Week 7 September 11 Creating the International System Part 3: 1945-onwards
Sept 18- Oct 1st Mid Semester Break
Week 8 October 2 No Classes 
Week 9 October 9

 

The Globalized International System

 

Week 10 October 16  Gender, Race and Culture in the International System
Week 11 October 23

Reading Week (no lectures or tutorials)

Thursday 26th of October (4.00 pm AEST). Essay must be submitted via turn-it-in

Week 12 October 30 Neoliberalism and its Discontents
Week 13 November 6 Resistance, Revolution and Change in the International System

 

Policies and Procedures

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central. Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Academic Honesty Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/academic_honesty/policy.html

Assessment Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/assessment/policy_2016.html

Grade Appeal Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/gradeappeal/policy.html

Complaint Management Procedure for Students and Members of the Public http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/complaint_management/procedure.html​

Disruption to Studies Policy http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/disruption_studies/policy.html The Disruption to Studies Policy is effective from March 3 2014 and replaces the Special Consideration Policy.

In addition, a number of other policies can be found in the Learning and Teaching Category of Policy Central.

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/support/student_conduct/

Results

Results shown in iLearn, or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent. For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au.

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Learning Skills

Learning Skills (mq.edu.au/learningskills) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to improve your marks and take control of your study.

Student Enquiry Service

For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at ask.mq.edu.au

Equity Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

IT Help

For help with University computer systems and technology, visit http://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/information_technology/help/

When using the University's IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use of IT Resources Policy. The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network including students.

Graduate Capabilities

PG - Discipline Knowledge and Skills

Our postgraduates will be able to demonstrate a significantly enhanced depth and breadth of knowledge, scholarly understanding, and specific subject content knowledge in their chosen fields.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • LEARNING OUTCOMES All academic programmes at Macquarie seek to develop graduate capabilities. These are: 1. Discipline-specific knowledge and skills; 2. Critical, analytical and integrative thinking; 3. Problem-solving and research capability 4. Creative and innovative; 5. Effective communication; 6. Engaged and ethical local and global citizens; 7. Socially and environmentally active and responsible; 8. Capable of professional and personal judgement and initiative; 9. Commitment to continuous learning. Note: The numbers listed at the end of each Learning Outcome indicate how it is aligned with the Graduate Capabilities. The learning outcomes of this unit are (link to graduate capabilities in brackets): A. Students will gain an awareness and are expected to develop an understanding of the history, dynamics and mechanisms of the international system [1, 6]; B. Students are expected to develop an ability to critically examine key issues and debates that are important in the field [1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9]; C. Students are expected to develop an ability to form considered arguments and views in relation to key debates and issues in the field [1, 2, 6, 7, 8]; D. In preparing for their written assignments, students are expected to develop independent research skills [2, 3]; and E. Students are expected to acquire the skills necessary to communicate their knowledge and arguments through in-class presentations, tutorial discussions and written assignments [2, 5].

Assessment tasks

  • Class participation
  • In-Class Exam
  • Major Essay

PG - Effective Communication

Our postgraduates will be able to communicate effectively and convey their views to different social, cultural, and professional audiences. They will be able to use a variety of technologically supported media to communicate with empathy using a range of written, spoken or visual formats.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • LEARNING OUTCOMES All academic programmes at Macquarie seek to develop graduate capabilities. These are: 1. Discipline-specific knowledge and skills; 2. Critical, analytical and integrative thinking; 3. Problem-solving and research capability 4. Creative and innovative; 5. Effective communication; 6. Engaged and ethical local and global citizens; 7. Socially and environmentally active and responsible; 8. Capable of professional and personal judgement and initiative; 9. Commitment to continuous learning. Note: The numbers listed at the end of each Learning Outcome indicate how it is aligned with the Graduate Capabilities. The learning outcomes of this unit are (link to graduate capabilities in brackets): A. Students will gain an awareness and are expected to develop an understanding of the history, dynamics and mechanisms of the international system [1, 6]; B. Students are expected to develop an ability to critically examine key issues and debates that are important in the field [1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9]; C. Students are expected to develop an ability to form considered arguments and views in relation to key debates and issues in the field [1, 2, 6, 7, 8]; D. In preparing for their written assignments, students are expected to develop independent research skills [2, 3]; and E. Students are expected to acquire the skills necessary to communicate their knowledge and arguments through in-class presentations, tutorial discussions and written assignments [2, 5].

Assessment tasks

  • Class participation
  • In-Class Exam

PG - Critical, Analytical and Integrative Thinking

Our postgraduates will be capable of utilising and reflecting on prior knowledge and experience, of applying higher level critical thinking skills, and of integrating and synthesising learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments. A characteristic of this form of thinking is the generation of new, professionally oriented knowledge through personal or group-based critique of practice and theory.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • LEARNING OUTCOMES All academic programmes at Macquarie seek to develop graduate capabilities. These are: 1. Discipline-specific knowledge and skills; 2. Critical, analytical and integrative thinking; 3. Problem-solving and research capability 4. Creative and innovative; 5. Effective communication; 6. Engaged and ethical local and global citizens; 7. Socially and environmentally active and responsible; 8. Capable of professional and personal judgement and initiative; 9. Commitment to continuous learning. Note: The numbers listed at the end of each Learning Outcome indicate how it is aligned with the Graduate Capabilities. The learning outcomes of this unit are (link to graduate capabilities in brackets): A. Students will gain an awareness and are expected to develop an understanding of the history, dynamics and mechanisms of the international system [1, 6]; B. Students are expected to develop an ability to critically examine key issues and debates that are important in the field [1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9]; C. Students are expected to develop an ability to form considered arguments and views in relation to key debates and issues in the field [1, 2, 6, 7, 8]; D. In preparing for their written assignments, students are expected to develop independent research skills [2, 3]; and E. Students are expected to acquire the skills necessary to communicate their knowledge and arguments through in-class presentations, tutorial discussions and written assignments [2, 5].

Assessment tasks

  • Class participation
  • In-Class Exam
  • Major Essay

PG - Research and Problem Solving Capability

Our postgraduates will be capable of systematic enquiry; able to use research skills to create new knowledge that can be applied to real world issues, or contribute to a field of study or practice to enhance society. They will be capable of creative questioning, problem finding and problem solving.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • LEARNING OUTCOMES All academic programmes at Macquarie seek to develop graduate capabilities. These are: 1. Discipline-specific knowledge and skills; 2. Critical, analytical and integrative thinking; 3. Problem-solving and research capability 4. Creative and innovative; 5. Effective communication; 6. Engaged and ethical local and global citizens; 7. Socially and environmentally active and responsible; 8. Capable of professional and personal judgement and initiative; 9. Commitment to continuous learning. Note: The numbers listed at the end of each Learning Outcome indicate how it is aligned with the Graduate Capabilities. The learning outcomes of this unit are (link to graduate capabilities in brackets): A. Students will gain an awareness and are expected to develop an understanding of the history, dynamics and mechanisms of the international system [1, 6]; B. Students are expected to develop an ability to critically examine key issues and debates that are important in the field [1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9]; C. Students are expected to develop an ability to form considered arguments and views in relation to key debates and issues in the field [1, 2, 6, 7, 8]; D. In preparing for their written assignments, students are expected to develop independent research skills [2, 3]; and E. Students are expected to acquire the skills necessary to communicate their knowledge and arguments through in-class presentations, tutorial discussions and written assignments [2, 5].

Assessment task

  • Major Essay

PG - Engaged and Responsible, Active and Ethical Citizens

Our postgraduates will be ethically aware and capable of confident transformative action in relation to their professional responsibilities and the wider community. They will have a sense of connectedness with others and country and have a sense of mutual obligation. They will be able to appreciate the impact of their professional roles for social justice and inclusion related to national and global issues

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • LEARNING OUTCOMES All academic programmes at Macquarie seek to develop graduate capabilities. These are: 1. Discipline-specific knowledge and skills; 2. Critical, analytical and integrative thinking; 3. Problem-solving and research capability 4. Creative and innovative; 5. Effective communication; 6. Engaged and ethical local and global citizens; 7. Socially and environmentally active and responsible; 8. Capable of professional and personal judgement and initiative; 9. Commitment to continuous learning. Note: The numbers listed at the end of each Learning Outcome indicate how it is aligned with the Graduate Capabilities. The learning outcomes of this unit are (link to graduate capabilities in brackets): A. Students will gain an awareness and are expected to develop an understanding of the history, dynamics and mechanisms of the international system [1, 6]; B. Students are expected to develop an ability to critically examine key issues and debates that are important in the field [1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9]; C. Students are expected to develop an ability to form considered arguments and views in relation to key debates and issues in the field [1, 2, 6, 7, 8]; D. In preparing for their written assignments, students are expected to develop independent research skills [2, 3]; and E. Students are expected to acquire the skills necessary to communicate their knowledge and arguments through in-class presentations, tutorial discussions and written assignments [2, 5].

Assessment tasks

  • Class participation
  • Major Essay

PG - Capable of Professional and Personal Judgment and Initiative

Our postgraduates will demonstrate a high standard of discernment and common sense in their professional and personal judgment. They will have the ability to make informed choices and decisions that reflect both the nature of their professional work and their personal perspectives.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • LEARNING OUTCOMES All academic programmes at Macquarie seek to develop graduate capabilities. These are: 1. Discipline-specific knowledge and skills; 2. Critical, analytical and integrative thinking; 3. Problem-solving and research capability 4. Creative and innovative; 5. Effective communication; 6. Engaged and ethical local and global citizens; 7. Socially and environmentally active and responsible; 8. Capable of professional and personal judgement and initiative; 9. Commitment to continuous learning. Note: The numbers listed at the end of each Learning Outcome indicate how it is aligned with the Graduate Capabilities. The learning outcomes of this unit are (link to graduate capabilities in brackets): A. Students will gain an awareness and are expected to develop an understanding of the history, dynamics and mechanisms of the international system [1, 6]; B. Students are expected to develop an ability to critically examine key issues and debates that are important in the field [1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9]; C. Students are expected to develop an ability to form considered arguments and views in relation to key debates and issues in the field [1, 2, 6, 7, 8]; D. In preparing for their written assignments, students are expected to develop independent research skills [2, 3]; and E. Students are expected to acquire the skills necessary to communicate their knowledge and arguments through in-class presentations, tutorial discussions and written assignments [2, 5].

Assessment tasks

  • Class participation
  • Major Essay