Logo Students

AHIS339 – Capstone Unit: Greece, Rome, Late Antiquity

2018 – S2 External

General Information

Pdf icon Download as PDF
Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff Convenor
Ian Worthington
Contact via ian.worthington@mq.edu.au
AHH 0135 Level 2, South Wing
Mondays 10.00–11.30 a.m., Thursdays 10.30 a.m.–12 noon, and by appointment
Credit points Credit points
3
Prerequisites Prerequisites
39cp at 100 level or above including (21cp in AHIS or AHST units including (6cps in AHIS or AHST units at 300 level))
Corequisites Corequisites
Co-badged status Co-badged status
Unit description Unit description
The theme of this unit is the value and exploitation of ancient (re)sources (artifacts) as well as their pitfalls for ancient history. Through a series of weekly seminars in the first half of semester, students will be exposed to a different variety of ancient evidence, and will come to understand its importance for, and impact on, our knowledge of the Greek, Roman, and Late Antiquity. Particularly emphasized will be numismatic evidence, in which your major research paper, due at semester's end, will be anchored. This focus on ancient resources will give all Greek, Roman, and Late Antiquity students flexibility to pursue their own interests in papers while adding to their knowledge gained during the degree program and offering a reflective approach on all work done during that time.

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at https://students.mq.edu.au/important-dates

Learning Outcomes

  1. consolidate knowledge in relation to the historical processes and fundamental historical developments in Greece and/or Rome and/or Late Antiquity
  2. develop sophisticated research skills
  3. articulate approaches to evaluating source material and, in particular, to critically use ancient sources and evaluate modern interpretations of these sources to an advanced level
  4. formulate arguments and articulation of ideas to an advanced level
  5. appreciate the larger issues that engage historians of Greece, Rome, and/or Late Antiquity and of the learning experiences encountered in the Ancient History Major

General Assessment Information

1) You MUST submit all required written work in order to pass the course. Submissions are via turnitin. Underneath each assignment on the iLearn site you will see a link on which to click to submit the relevant piece of work.

2) You MUST have a supervisor for your research paper or it will not be accepted.

3) LATE PENALTY: Unless a Special Consideration request has been submitted and approved, (a) a penalty for lateness will apply – two (2) marks out of 100 will be deducted per day for assignments submitted after the due date – and (b) no assignment will be accepted more than seven (7) days (incl. weekends) after the original submission deadline. No late submissions will be accepted for timed assessments – e.g. quizzes, online tests.

4) IMPORTANT NOTE ON FINAL MARKS: The department has moved to include the following statement concerning all of its courses with respect to the marks you receive for work during the session: 'that the marks given are indicative only; final marks will be determined after moderation'.

5) Do not plagiarise: plagiarism will not be tolerated; see 'MQ Academic Honesty' section below.

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Hurdle Due
1 Revised Paper 30% No Friday, 14 September, Week 7
2 Research Paper Plan 10% No Friday, 7 September, Week 6
3 Research Paper 50% No Friday, 9 November, Week 13
Seminar Assignment 1 5% No Friday, 31 August, Week 5
Seminar Assignment 2 5% No Friday, 5 October, Week 8

1 Revised Paper

Due: Friday, 14 September, Week 7
Weighting: 30%

This is a self-reflection exercise, which students in the previous capstone course said was very beneficial, especially when it came to writing the research paper.

Choose any paper you wrote for any GRLA ancient history course here at Macquarie, and rewrite it from the angle of the relevant ancient sources and methodology you have been learning about in the capstone.

Probably you did not use some of the ancient sources you will meet in this class in your original paper, while you may change your perception or use of the ones in your original. At the end of your revised paper, add a brief, half-to-three-quarters-of-a-page self-reflection of how different (if any) your approach has been in the revision process, and how your previous argumentation and even conclusions might have changed. 

Note: the focus of this exercise is not to make you change your original conclusion(s); rather it is on how you handle the ancient sources and your approach to them now.

The revised paper should be 1,000 words long (excluding bibliography) PLUS the additional self-reflection. This means you may have to add to, or reduce, the length of your original paper to meet the required 1,000 words.

Also include your original paper. 

So you will submit one document via turnitin containing (please combine into only one file):

1) original paper (put this first),

2) revised paper, and

3) half-to-three-quarters-of-a-page self-reflection.

Submit by the due time and date or penalties for lateness will be applied.

The Revised Paper is worth 30% of your final grade.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • consolidate knowledge in relation to the historical processes and fundamental historical developments in Greece and/or Rome and/or Late Antiquity
  • develop sophisticated research skills
  • articulate approaches to evaluating source material and, in particular, to critically use ancient sources and evaluate modern interpretations of these sources to an advanced level
  • formulate arguments and articulation of ideas to an advanced level
  • appreciate the larger issues that engage historians of Greece, Rome, and/or Late Antiquity and of the learning experiences encountered in the Ancient History Major

2 Research Paper Plan

Due: Friday, 7 September, Week 6
Weighting: 10%

The Research Paper Plan (this exercise) is the required prelude to writing your formal Research Paper (next section down).

It is crucial that you follow all the steps below, and are not late with any one. If you are late, or if you do not liaise with me or your supervisor at the allotted times, then you are likely to fail the course. 

If you do not have a supervisor, your Research Paper will not be accepted.

NOT BEING ON CAMPUS IS NOT AN EXCUSE FOR NOT CONTACTING ME OR YOUR SUPERVISOR WHEN REQUIRED TO DO SO - contact need not be in person but via email, and everyone has access to that at all times.

1. By Friday, 10th August (Week 2): You will send me a general area of study of your research paper and the name of a preferred supervisor (see the list of personnel below). 

Over the next week, academic staff will meet to match advisers with students; note that you might not get your preferred supervisor, in which case I will assign you someone as close to your topic as possible.

2. By Friday, 24th August (Week 4): You will make  contact with your supervisor, outlining your research topic, approach, sources, etc.

3. By Friday, 7th September (Week 6): You will submit via turnitin a research paper plan consisting of title (max. 20 words); project description (max. 100 words); structural outline; and basic bibliography. Supervisors will give detailed comments on this plan and give it a mark. (There is no marking rubric for this exercise.)

4. By Friday, 9th November (Week 13): You will submit via turnitin your final research paper.

Submit by the due time and date or penalties for lateness will be applied.

The Research Paper Plan is worth 10% of your final grade.

POTENTIAL SUPERVISORS (some overlaps in fields)

Greek History

Gil Davis (Archaic-Classical; numismatics)

Chris Forbes (Hellenistic)

Susan Lupack (Bronze Age)

Paul McKechnie (Classical-Hellenistic)

Ian Plant (Classical)

Ken Sheedy (Archaic-numismatics)

Ian Worthington (Classical-Hellenistic)

Roman History

Eva Anagnostou-Laoutides (Empire to 4th cent.)

Lea Beness (Republic; Women & Gender)

Caillan Davenport (Republic-Empire)

Danijel Dzino (Empire)

Peter Keegan (Republic-Early Empire)

Ray Laurence (Republic-Empire)

Paul McKechnie (Republic)

Late Antiquity

Malcolm Choat (Late Antiquity)

Caillan Davenport (Late Antiquity)

Danijel Dzino (Byzantium-Early Mediaeval)

Andrew Gillett (Later Roman Empire-Early Mediaeval)

Meaghan McEvoy (Later Roman Empire-Byzantium)

Alanna Nobbs (Late Antiquity-Early Byzantine)


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • consolidate knowledge in relation to the historical processes and fundamental historical developments in Greece and/or Rome and/or Late Antiquity
  • develop sophisticated research skills
  • articulate approaches to evaluating source material and, in particular, to critically use ancient sources and evaluate modern interpretations of these sources to an advanced level
  • formulate arguments and articulation of ideas to an advanced level
  • appreciate the larger issues that engage historians of Greece, Rome, and/or Late Antiquity and of the learning experiences encountered in the Ancient History Major

3 Research Paper

Due: Friday, 9 November, Week 13
Weighting: 50%

Your Research Paper should be a topic of your own choosing, with the methodology following on from the Revised Paper (in other words, there should be a major engagement with literary, numismatic, epigraphic, and other evidence).

Your Research Paper should be 3,000 words maximum in length including notes (but excluding bibliography).

It should be typed, double-spaced, size 12 font, throughout. On a separate page at the end provide a bibliography listing all works consulted (this page is not included in the page count).

The paper should be submitted via turnitin. 

To ensure you are on track for timely completion consult the 'How to Manage your Time and Write the Long Paper' section.

There is no preferred referencing system; for me, content of your work is what gets the marks, not how you set out references, foot notes, etc.  However, the university does have a guide to referencing systems for assignments, which can be found at: https://www.mq.edu.au/public/download/?id=292059

Submit by the due time and date or penalties for lateness will be applied.

The Research Paper is worth 50% of your final grade.

 


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • consolidate knowledge in relation to the historical processes and fundamental historical developments in Greece and/or Rome and/or Late Antiquity
  • develop sophisticated research skills
  • articulate approaches to evaluating source material and, in particular, to critically use ancient sources and evaluate modern interpretations of these sources to an advanced level
  • formulate arguments and articulation of ideas to an advanced level
  • appreciate the larger issues that engage historians of Greece, Rome, and/or Late Antiquity and of the learning experiences encountered in the Ancient History Major

Seminar Assignment 1

Due: Friday, 31 August, Week 5
Weighting: 5%

There are seven seminars in this course, each dealing with a different topic/type of material, and each with a series of discussion questions geared to the topic.  

You are to choose ANY ONE discussion question from Seminars 1-4 (= Assignment 1) and ANY ONE discussion question from Seminars 5-7 (= Assignment 2), write c. 300 words on each one, and submit each one by the following dates:

Assignment 1: By Friday, 31st August (Week 5)

Assignment 2: By Friday, 5th October (Week 8)

There is no marking rubric for these assignments. Essentially, I am wanting to read how the content of seminar informed your answer, and what your opinions are on the subject matter.

These two pieces of work together are worth 10% of the grade.

Submit by the due time and date or penalties for lateness will be applied.

The two assignments together are worth 10% of your final grade.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • consolidate knowledge in relation to the historical processes and fundamental historical developments in Greece and/or Rome and/or Late Antiquity
  • develop sophisticated research skills
  • articulate approaches to evaluating source material and, in particular, to critically use ancient sources and evaluate modern interpretations of these sources to an advanced level
  • formulate arguments and articulation of ideas to an advanced level
  • appreciate the larger issues that engage historians of Greece, Rome, and/or Late Antiquity and of the learning experiences encountered in the Ancient History Major

Seminar Assignment 2

Due: Friday, 5 October, Week 8
Weighting: 5%

There are seven seminars in this course, each dealing with a different topic/type of material, and each with a series of discussion questions geared to the topic.  

You are to choose ANY ONE discussion question from Seminars 1-4 (= Assignment 1) and ANY ONE discussion question from Seminars 5-7 (= Assignment 2), write c. 300 words on each one, and submit each one by the following dates:

Assignment 1: By Friday, 31st August (Week 5)

Assignment 2: By Friday, 5th October (Week 8)

There is no marking rubric for these assignments. Essentially, I am wanting to read how the content of seminar informed your answer, and what your opinions are on the subject matter.

These two pieces of work together are worth 10% of the grade.

Submit by the due time and date or penalties for lateness will be applied.

The two assignments together are worth 10% of your final grade.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • consolidate knowledge in relation to the historical processes and fundamental historical developments in Greece and/or Rome and/or Late Antiquity
  • develop sophisticated research skills
  • articulate approaches to evaluating source material and, in particular, to critically use ancient sources and evaluate modern interpretations of these sources to an advanced level
  • formulate arguments and articulation of ideas to an advanced level
  • appreciate the larger issues that engage historians of Greece, Rome, and/or Late Antiquity and of the learning experiences encountered in the Ancient History Major

Delivery and Resources

DELIVERY SCHEDULE, METHOD, UNIT WEBPAGE, TECHNOLOGY USED, SKILLS REQUIRED

Schedule: Internal: Campus Sessions (Weeks 1-7) - mandatory; Online (Weeks 1-7) - mandatory

Method: AHIS339 is delivered in blended mode as a Macquarie University unit of study.

Webpage: Online units can be accessed at: http://ilearn.mq.edu.au/

Technology used and skills required: PC and Internet access are required. Basic computer skills (e.g., internet browsing) and skills in word processing are also a requirement.

Please contact IT Services for any further, more specific requirements about technology.

Times and Locations for Lectures and Tutorials: 

There are no lectures or tutorials offered in this unit. 

There are seven campus seminars for this unit.

The campus session is scheduled in Week 1- Week 7. Internal students must attend.

WHEN: 11am-1pm, Wednesdays, starting 1 August

WHERE:  Tutorial Room 264, 14 Sir Christopher Ondaatje Ave.

It is a requirement of this unit that students who are enrolled in Internal mode attend on-campus sessions. Students enrolled in External mode may attend campus sessions. All seminars will be recorded for digital upload.

Required and recommended resources

Prescribed text(s): eReserve readings (see individual seminars).

Prescribed unit materials: None

Recommended texts: prior Ancient History unit guides, bibliographies, and lecture/tutorial notes

Unit Schedule

Week 1: Welcome; Fragments vs. Texts

Week 2: Methodological and Comparative Perspectives on the Roman Imperial Court

Week 3: Greek Epigraphy and Restorations

Week 4: Christianity and Monasticism in the Papyri

Week 5: Numismatics, Archaeology and the Study of Material Culture

Week 6: Byzantine Hagiography

Week 7: Archaeology and the Linear B Tablets

Week 8-13: Working on Research Paper (no classes/discussions)

 

Policies and Procedures

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central (https://staff.mq.edu.au/work/strategy-planning-and-governance/university-policies-and-procedures/policy-central). Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Undergraduate students seeking more policy resources can visit the Student Policy Gateway (https://students.mq.edu.au/support/study/student-policy-gateway). It is your one-stop-shop for the key policies you need to know about throughout your undergraduate student journey.

If you would like to see all the policies relevant to Learning and Teaching visit Policy Central (https://staff.mq.edu.au/work/strategy-planning-and-governance/university-policies-and-procedures/policy-central).

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/study/getting-started/student-conduct​

Results

Results shown in iLearn, or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent. For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au.

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Learning Skills

Learning Skills (mq.edu.au/learningskills) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to improve your marks and take control of your study.

Student Enquiry Service

For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at ask.mq.edu.au

Equity Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

IT Help

For help with University computer systems and technology, visit http://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/information_technology/help/

When using the University's IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use of IT Resources Policy. The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network including students.

Graduate Capabilities

Creative and Innovative

Our graduates will also be capable of creative thinking and of creating knowledge. They will be imaginative and open to experience and capable of innovation at work and in the community. We want them to be engaged in applying their critical, creative thinking.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • consolidate knowledge in relation to the historical processes and fundamental historical developments in Greece and/or Rome and/or Late Antiquity
  • develop sophisticated research skills
  • articulate approaches to evaluating source material and, in particular, to critically use ancient sources and evaluate modern interpretations of these sources to an advanced level
  • formulate arguments and articulation of ideas to an advanced level
  • appreciate the larger issues that engage historians of Greece, Rome, and/or Late Antiquity and of the learning experiences encountered in the Ancient History Major

Assessment tasks

  • 1 Revised Paper
  • 2 Research Paper Plan
  • 3 Research Paper
  • Seminar Assignment 1
  • Seminar Assignment 2

Engaged and Ethical Local and Global citizens

As local citizens our graduates will be aware of indigenous perspectives and of the nation's historical context. They will be engaged with the challenges of contemporary society and with knowledge and ideas. We want our graduates to have respect for diversity, to be open-minded, sensitive to others and inclusive, and to be open to other cultures and perspectives: they should have a level of cultural literacy. Our graduates should be aware of disadvantage and social justice, and be willing to participate to help create a wiser and better society.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • consolidate knowledge in relation to the historical processes and fundamental historical developments in Greece and/or Rome and/or Late Antiquity
  • articulate approaches to evaluating source material and, in particular, to critically use ancient sources and evaluate modern interpretations of these sources to an advanced level

Assessment tasks

  • 1 Revised Paper
  • 2 Research Paper Plan

Socially and Environmentally Active and Responsible

We want our graduates to be aware of and have respect for self and others; to be able to work with others as a leader and a team player; to have a sense of connectedness with others and country; and to have a sense of mutual obligation. Our graduates should be informed and active participants in moving society towards sustainability.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • consolidate knowledge in relation to the historical processes and fundamental historical developments in Greece and/or Rome and/or Late Antiquity
  • develop sophisticated research skills
  • appreciate the larger issues that engage historians of Greece, Rome, and/or Late Antiquity and of the learning experiences encountered in the Ancient History Major

Assessment task

  • 2 Research Paper Plan

Commitment to Continuous Learning

Our graduates will have enquiring minds and a literate curiosity which will lead them to pursue knowledge for its own sake. They will continue to pursue learning in their careers and as they participate in the world. They will be capable of reflecting on their experiences and relationships with others and the environment, learning from them, and growing - personally, professionally and socially.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • develop sophisticated research skills
  • articulate approaches to evaluating source material and, in particular, to critically use ancient sources and evaluate modern interpretations of these sources to an advanced level
  • formulate arguments and articulation of ideas to an advanced level
  • appreciate the larger issues that engage historians of Greece, Rome, and/or Late Antiquity and of the learning experiences encountered in the Ancient History Major

Assessment tasks

  • 1 Revised Paper
  • 2 Research Paper Plan
  • 3 Research Paper
  • Seminar Assignment 1
  • Seminar Assignment 2

Problem Solving and Research Capability

Our graduates should be capable of researching; of analysing, and interpreting and assessing data and information in various forms; of drawing connections across fields of knowledge; and they should be able to relate their knowledge to complex situations at work or in the world, in order to diagnose and solve problems. We want them to have the confidence to take the initiative in doing so, within an awareness of their own limitations.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • consolidate knowledge in relation to the historical processes and fundamental historical developments in Greece and/or Rome and/or Late Antiquity
  • develop sophisticated research skills
  • articulate approaches to evaluating source material and, in particular, to critically use ancient sources and evaluate modern interpretations of these sources to an advanced level
  • formulate arguments and articulation of ideas to an advanced level
  • appreciate the larger issues that engage historians of Greece, Rome, and/or Late Antiquity and of the learning experiences encountered in the Ancient History Major

Assessment tasks

  • 1 Revised Paper
  • 2 Research Paper Plan
  • 3 Research Paper
  • Seminar Assignment 1
  • Seminar Assignment 2

Effective Communication

We want to develop in our students the ability to communicate and convey their views in forms effective with different audiences. We want our graduates to take with them the capability to read, listen, question, gather and evaluate information resources in a variety of formats, assess, write clearly, speak effectively, and to use visual communication and communication technologies as appropriate.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • consolidate knowledge in relation to the historical processes and fundamental historical developments in Greece and/or Rome and/or Late Antiquity
  • develop sophisticated research skills
  • articulate approaches to evaluating source material and, in particular, to critically use ancient sources and evaluate modern interpretations of these sources to an advanced level
  • formulate arguments and articulation of ideas to an advanced level
  • appreciate the larger issues that engage historians of Greece, Rome, and/or Late Antiquity and of the learning experiences encountered in the Ancient History Major

Assessment tasks

  • 1 Revised Paper
  • 2 Research Paper Plan
  • 3 Research Paper
  • Seminar Assignment 2

Capable of Professional and Personal Judgement and Initiative

We want our graduates to have emotional intelligence and sound interpersonal skills and to demonstrate discernment and common sense in their professional and personal judgement. They will exercise initiative as needed. They will be capable of risk assessment, and be able to handle ambiguity and complexity, enabling them to be adaptable in diverse and changing environments.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • develop sophisticated research skills
  • articulate approaches to evaluating source material and, in particular, to critically use ancient sources and evaluate modern interpretations of these sources to an advanced level
  • formulate arguments and articulation of ideas to an advanced level
  • appreciate the larger issues that engage historians of Greece, Rome, and/or Late Antiquity and of the learning experiences encountered in the Ancient History Major

Assessment tasks

  • 1 Revised Paper
  • 3 Research Paper

Discipline Specific Knowledge and Skills

Our graduates will take with them the intellectual development, depth and breadth of knowledge, scholarly understanding, and specific subject content in their chosen fields to make them competent and confident in their subject or profession. They will be able to demonstrate, where relevant, professional technical competence and meet professional standards. They will be able to articulate the structure of knowledge of their discipline, be able to adapt discipline-specific knowledge to novel situations, and be able to contribute from their discipline to inter-disciplinary solutions to problems.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • consolidate knowledge in relation to the historical processes and fundamental historical developments in Greece and/or Rome and/or Late Antiquity
  • develop sophisticated research skills
  • articulate approaches to evaluating source material and, in particular, to critically use ancient sources and evaluate modern interpretations of these sources to an advanced level
  • formulate arguments and articulation of ideas to an advanced level
  • appreciate the larger issues that engage historians of Greece, Rome, and/or Late Antiquity and of the learning experiences encountered in the Ancient History Major

Assessment tasks

  • 1 Revised Paper
  • 2 Research Paper Plan
  • 3 Research Paper
  • Seminar Assignment 1
  • Seminar Assignment 2

Critical, Analytical and Integrative Thinking

We want our graduates to be capable of reasoning, questioning and analysing, and to integrate and synthesise learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments; to be able to critique constraints, assumptions and limitations; to be able to think independently and systemically in relation to scholarly activity, in the workplace, and in the world. We want them to have a level of scientific and information technology literacy.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • consolidate knowledge in relation to the historical processes and fundamental historical developments in Greece and/or Rome and/or Late Antiquity
  • develop sophisticated research skills
  • articulate approaches to evaluating source material and, in particular, to critically use ancient sources and evaluate modern interpretations of these sources to an advanced level
  • formulate arguments and articulation of ideas to an advanced level
  • appreciate the larger issues that engage historians of Greece, Rome, and/or Late Antiquity and of the learning experiences encountered in the Ancient History Major

Assessment tasks

  • 1 Revised Paper
  • 2 Research Paper Plan
  • 3 Research Paper
  • Seminar Assignment 1
  • Seminar Assignment 2

Changes from Previous Offering

a) Different theme, focus on ancient sources, especially numismatics

b) different work requirements

c) internal students will attend weekly seminars for first half of semester unlike last time when they did everything online