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MHIX300 – Making History Work

2018 – S2 OUA

General Information

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Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff
Prerequisites Prerequisites
Corequisites Corequisites
Co-badged status Co-badged status
Unit description Unit description
The capstone unit is the pinnacle of a major in Modern History. It brings together the knowledge, skills and capabilities students gain across the program and helps prepare them for the next stage of their careers. What does a Modern history graduate bring to the workplace? How can the skills gained be transferred? How do students/graduates define themselves in a work sense? How has the major fitted them for future employment? With these questions in mind students undertake activities, collaboratively and individually, to reflect on their historical literacy and where it can take them. All enrolment queries should be directed to Open Universities Australia (OUA): see www.open.edu.au

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at https://www.open.edu.au/student-admin-and-support/key-dates/

Learning Outcomes

  1. Reflect on and articulate discipline specific skills and graduate capabilities and their potential application beyond University
  2. Synthesise and integrate knowledge from multiple topic areas
  3. Extend analytical and critical thinking
  4. Build and consolidate communication skills (written, oral, interpersonal)
  5. Understand what historical literacy is
  6. Work independently and collaboratively to solve problems and find creative solutions

General Assessment Information

All assessments for this unit are clearly identified and instructions laid out in iLearn. Please consult the iLearn homepage and take the time to scroll through it, paying particular attention to the dedicated section on Assessment.

 Late Submission Penalty

“Unless a Special Consideration request has been submitted and approved, (a) a penalty for lateness will apply – two (2) marks out of 100 will be deducted per day for assignments submitted after the due date – and (b) no assignment will be accepted more than seven (7) days (incl. weekends) after the original submission deadline. 

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Hurdle Due
Individual Debate Thesis 30% No Monday, 10th September
Debating Cup 50% No Weeks 11 and 12
Reflective Exercise 10% No Friday, 16th November
Active Collaboration 10% No Assessed across the semester

Individual Debate Thesis

Due: Monday, 10th September
Weighting: 30%

Students construct a written response/argument to a debate/jigsaw topic. The topics will be distributed in week 2 of the semester. This paper will represent a response to the topic in full and must include at least three historical or historiographical examples. These might be drawn from topics and/or themes from previous units of study. This paper will form the foundation of the debate/jigsaw presentations in weeks 11 and 12.

Length: 2500 words (not including references) and bibliography.

Submission: Via turnitin


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Synthesise and integrate knowledge from multiple topic areas
  • Extend analytical and critical thinking
  • Build and consolidate communication skills (written, oral, interpersonal)
  • Work independently and collaboratively to solve problems and find creative solutions

Debating Cup

Due: Weeks 11 and 12
Weighting: 50%

In the second week of the unit students will choose a debate topic from a hat in class. Students then work on their debates, individually and as part of their group, both in class and externally. The topics are broad, designed to allow students to range across themes and topics they may have done during the course of their major. The key is that debaters have to think about their topics in an historical/historiographical way. There must be an historical dimension to the debate and this figures in the rubric for this activity.

Where groups don't neatly divide into 6 and there are between 1-5 people left over another method will be used known as a Jigsaw which is a commensurate activity/assessment requiring students to operate in similar ways as debaters around a topic or theme. Where this eventuates there will be discussion and explanation in the first weeks of the semester. There will also be specific instructions around this activity on iLearn.

In weeks 11 and 12 there will be a debating/jigsaw cup where, individually and as part of an assigned group, students will present their arguments for their prescribed topics in oral form. The format will be like a formal debate and each speaker will have between 6-8 minutes. The unit convenors will chair/moderate the debates and decide the best debate group for each class which will be presented with the 2018 Debating Cup medallion.

External Students (including OUA)

All external students students will be required to participate in this activity too. Students will be allocated their topics and groups in the second week by choosing a number which correponds to a topic and/or position in the debate. The convenor will then post up the debate/jigsaw lists. The debates will be conducted across week 11 and 12 at a time agreeable to all. The debates will be conducted online via Zoom (web conferencing software). Students can also use Zoom to work on their assigned topics and use cloud sharing tools like Google docs to take notes and share information and ideas and manage the planning of the presentations in the meantime.

All external students will need to download Zoom software (see Delivery and Resources section of this guide) at the beginning of semester and will be provided with a schedule meeting date and link for the debates by week 10. If this all seems foreign to you - please don't panic. The convenor will spend time in the first weeks making sure it is all bedded in place and that all understand what is required. The main thing is that you familiarise yourself with the iLearn space for this unit. The iLearn homepage is absolutely critical for all students but especially external students. It contains all the vital information and the links for our weekly online discussions. It is via the site that the convenor uploads important bits of information. All the instructions around using zoom are on the site, for example. The convenor will be onboard from the start of semester so please use the discussion forum to field any questions you might have.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Synthesise and integrate knowledge from multiple topic areas
  • Extend analytical and critical thinking
  • Build and consolidate communication skills (written, oral, interpersonal)
  • Work independently and collaboratively to solve problems and find creative solutions

Reflective Exercise

Due: Friday, 16th November
Weighting: 10%

Students will be required to write a reflection about your Modern History journey from the perspective of skills. Identify up to five skills that you consider you have gained and how. Provide examples. When doing this task consider what it is you take into your careers as a Modern History major. The themes we've covered in this unit might also be considered.

Wordlength: 800 words

Submission: Turnitin


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Reflect on and articulate discipline specific skills and graduate capabilities and their potential application beyond University
  • Extend analytical and critical thinking
  • Build and consolidate communication skills (written, oral, interpersonal)
  • Understand what historical literacy is

Active Collaboration

Due: Assessed across the semester
Weighting: 10%

Students will be assessed on their active collaboration in all aspects of the unit across the semester. The following criteria will apply:

  • Collaboration with peers in all groups tasks (Co-operation, listening, effective communication, sharing, respect)
  • Effective Communication (Participation and contribution to all class discussions and in collaboration with peers, respect, consideration)
  • Engagement (Participating in and engaging with the unit overall, the content, the discussions and all the activities)
  • Presence (Attendance, preparedness, focus, curiosity, contributions)

This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Reflect on and articulate discipline specific skills and graduate capabilities and their potential application beyond University
  • Synthesise and integrate knowledge from multiple topic areas
  • Extend analytical and critical thinking
  • Build and consolidate communication skills (written, oral, interpersonal)
  • Understand what historical literacy is
  • Work independently and collaboratively to solve problems and find creative solutions

Delivery and Resources

The unit is supported by a comprehensive iLearn space which is the face of interaction between convenor and students. It is important that you have access to reliable internet.

Online Discussion Forum (dedicated external/OUA space)

The unit consists of a weekly schedule (see below) of topics and themes for discussion. Each week we work through the successive tabs on iLearn. For each you will see the title, a short introductory blurb, compulsory readings, and activities and/or questions. Each week the convenor will post comments and items of discussion in the online discussion forum for that week. This is the designated online discussion forum for all external students and they are expected to participate regularly in these discussions. Indeed, just as for day students, attendance is compulsory in the discussion forum (on a weekly basis) for external students too.

* All compulsory weekly readings will be found in the Leganto Readings Link on the iLearn homepage*. This is a fantastic resource where all readings appear organised in weekly slots. It means there are no excuses for not doing the readings.

THE DEBATES:

To faciliate the debates for external students and internal students who might want to collaborate on these outside of class time, we will be using Zoom which is a web conferencing facility. There are some guidelines below. The unit convenor will also be setting up some initial zoom meeting times for the external students. Hopefully all externals will be able to make one these meetings. They will occur at the beginning of semester so that the convenor can touch base with all externals to talk through how the unit will be run and aspects of assessment. This will also give external students the chance to ask questions, etc.

All students will need to download the free zoom app.

Zoom Web Conferencing Guidelines

How to use Zoom

Web conferencing facilitates real-time online communication and collaboration. Zoom is Macquarie’s web conferencing tool, it provides video and voice communication, text chat, interactive whiteboard, screen sharing and annotation. Through Zoom you can include an external guest speaker in your lecture and offer real-time online tutorials and virtual consultations for students. To use Zoom, login using your MQ OneID. You will be prompted to download the Zoom software, this will only take a minute. You will have access to a Zoom Basic account where you can hold online meetings for 40 minutes at a time with up to 50 participants. If you would like to use Zoom with more than 50 participants, please email ilearn.help@mq.edu.au to discuss alternative solutions.

EXTERNAL STUDENTS

External students are required to use Zoom to collaborate with their debating team members to develop and formulate their debate.

You are required to:

  • throughout the session you need to meet with each other using Zoom on a regular basis 
  • please record each Zoom meeting so that you can refer to what has been said
  • please use shared google docs to record the minutes of the meeting, formulation of the debate and actions that required

Please note:  External students (only) will use Zoom to deliver their debate.  You will be advised of the date and time that you all must be available to deliver the debate.

Resources for using Zoom

INTERNAL STUDENTS

Internal students have the opportunity to use Zoom to collaborate with their debating team members to develop and formulate their debate.  If you choose to collaborate in this manner then please use the resources below:

  • How to use shared Google docs
  • Link to Zoom guides
    • Hold an Online meeting
    • Record an Online meeting
    • Check and update Zoom
    • Guide your students/participants
  • NB These guidelines are reproduced in iLearn along with some handy instructional videos for further clarification.

Unit Schedule

Week Topic
1 Introductory
2 What is History and Does it Matter?
3 Historical Literacy: Asking Questions
4 Historical Literacy: Critical Thinking
5 Historical Literacy: Historical Imagination
6 Historical Literacy: Historical Judgement
7 Q&A with Modern History Alumni
8 Mapping Group Debates/Jigsaws
9 History and Policy
10 Consuming History
11 In-class Debates
12 In-class Debates
13 Review and Reflection

 

Policies and Procedures

Late Submission - applies unless otherwise stated elsewhere in the unit guide

Unless a Special Consideration request has been submitted and approved, (a) a penalty for lateness will apply – two (2) marks out of 100 will be deducted per day for assignments submitted after the due date – and (b) no assignment will be accepted more than seven (7) days (incl. weekends) after the original submission deadline. No late submissions will be accepted for timed assessments – e.g. quizzes, online tests.

Extension Request

Special Consideration Policy and Procedure (https://staff.mq.edu.au/work/strategy-planning-and-governance/university-policies-and-procedures/policies/special-consideration)

The University recognises that students may experience events or conditions that adversely affect their academic performance. If you experience serious and unavoidable difficulties at exam time or when assessment tasks are due, you can consider applying for Special Consideration.

You need to show that the circumstances:

  1. were serious, unexpected and unavoidable
  2. were beyond your control
  3. caused substantial disruption to your academic work
  4. substantially interfered with your otherwise satisfactory fulfilment of the unit requirements
  5. lasted at least three consecutive days or a total of 5 days within the teaching period and prevented completion of an assessment task scheduled for a specific date.

If you feel that your studies have been impacted submit an application as follows:

  1. Visit Ask MQ and use your OneID to log in
  2. Fill in your relevant details
  3. Attach supporting documents by clicking 'Add a reply', click 'Browse' and navigating to the files you want to attach, then click 'Submit Form' to send your notification and supporting documents
  4. Please keep copies of your original documents, as they may be requested in the future as part of the assessment process

Outcome

Once your submission is assessed, an appropriate outcome will be organised.

OUA Specific Policies and Procedures

Withdrawal from a unit after the census date

You can withdraw from your subjects prior to the census date (last day to withdraw). If you successfully withdraw before the census date, you won’t need to apply for Special Circumstances. If you find yourself unable to withdraw from your subjects before the census date - you might be able to apply for Special Circumstances. If you’re eligible, we can refund your fees and overturn your fail grade.

If you’re studying Single Subjects using FEE-HELP or paying up front, you can apply online.

If you’re studying a degree using HECS-HELP, you’ll need to apply directly to Macquarie University.

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central (https://staff.mq.edu.au/work/strategy-planning-and-governance/university-policies-and-procedures/policy-central). Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Undergraduate students seeking more policy resources can visit the Student Policy Gateway (https://students.mq.edu.au/support/study/student-policy-gateway). It is your one-stop-shop for the key policies you need to know about throughout your undergraduate student journey.

If you would like to see all the policies relevant to Learning and Teaching visit Policy Central (https://staff.mq.edu.au/work/strategy-planning-and-governance/university-policies-and-procedures/policy-central).

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/study/getting-started/student-conduct​

Results

Results shown in iLearn, or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent. For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au.

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Learning Skills

Learning Skills (mq.edu.au/learningskills) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to improve your marks and take control of your study.

Student Enquiry Service

For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at ask.mq.edu.au

Equity Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

IT Help

For help with University computer systems and technology, visit http://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/information_technology/help/

When using the University's IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use of IT Resources Policy. The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network including students.

Graduate Capabilities

Problem Solving and Research Capability

Our graduates should be capable of researching; of analysing, and interpreting and assessing data and information in various forms; of drawing connections across fields of knowledge; and they should be able to relate their knowledge to complex situations at work or in the world, in order to diagnose and solve problems. We want them to have the confidence to take the initiative in doing so, within an awareness of their own limitations.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Reflect on and articulate discipline specific skills and graduate capabilities and their potential application beyond University
  • Synthesise and integrate knowledge from multiple topic areas
  • Extend analytical and critical thinking
  • Work independently and collaboratively to solve problems and find creative solutions

Assessment tasks

  • Individual Debate Thesis
  • Debating Cup

Effective Communication

We want to develop in our students the ability to communicate and convey their views in forms effective with different audiences. We want our graduates to take with them the capability to read, listen, question, gather and evaluate information resources in a variety of formats, assess, write clearly, speak effectively, and to use visual communication and communication technologies as appropriate.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Reflect on and articulate discipline specific skills and graduate capabilities and their potential application beyond University
  • Build and consolidate communication skills (written, oral, interpersonal)
  • Work independently and collaboratively to solve problems and find creative solutions

Assessment tasks

  • Individual Debate Thesis
  • Debating Cup
  • Reflective Exercise
  • Active Collaboration

Capable of Professional and Personal Judgement and Initiative

We want our graduates to have emotional intelligence and sound interpersonal skills and to demonstrate discernment and common sense in their professional and personal judgement. They will exercise initiative as needed. They will be capable of risk assessment, and be able to handle ambiguity and complexity, enabling them to be adaptable in diverse and changing environments.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Reflect on and articulate discipline specific skills and graduate capabilities and their potential application beyond University
  • Synthesise and integrate knowledge from multiple topic areas
  • Build and consolidate communication skills (written, oral, interpersonal)
  • Work independently and collaboratively to solve problems and find creative solutions

Assessment tasks

  • Individual Debate Thesis
  • Reflective Exercise
  • Active Collaboration

Discipline Specific Knowledge and Skills

Our graduates will take with them the intellectual development, depth and breadth of knowledge, scholarly understanding, and specific subject content in their chosen fields to make them competent and confident in their subject or profession. They will be able to demonstrate, where relevant, professional technical competence and meet professional standards. They will be able to articulate the structure of knowledge of their discipline, be able to adapt discipline-specific knowledge to novel situations, and be able to contribute from their discipline to inter-disciplinary solutions to problems.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Reflect on and articulate discipline specific skills and graduate capabilities and their potential application beyond University
  • Synthesise and integrate knowledge from multiple topic areas
  • Understand what historical literacy is

Assessment tasks

  • Individual Debate Thesis
  • Debating Cup
  • Reflective Exercise

Critical, Analytical and Integrative Thinking

We want our graduates to be capable of reasoning, questioning and analysing, and to integrate and synthesise learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments; to be able to critique constraints, assumptions and limitations; to be able to think independently and systemically in relation to scholarly activity, in the workplace, and in the world. We want them to have a level of scientific and information technology literacy.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Reflect on and articulate discipline specific skills and graduate capabilities and their potential application beyond University
  • Synthesise and integrate knowledge from multiple topic areas
  • Extend analytical and critical thinking

Assessment task

  • Debating Cup

Creative and Innovative

Our graduates will also be capable of creative thinking and of creating knowledge. They will be imaginative and open to experience and capable of innovation at work and in the community. We want them to be engaged in applying their critical, creative thinking.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Reflect on and articulate discipline specific skills and graduate capabilities and their potential application beyond University
  • Synthesise and integrate knowledge from multiple topic areas
  • Extend analytical and critical thinking
  • Work independently and collaboratively to solve problems and find creative solutions

Assessment tasks

  • Individual Debate Thesis
  • Debating Cup
  • Reflective Exercise

Engaged and Ethical Local and Global citizens

As local citizens our graduates will be aware of indigenous perspectives and of the nation's historical context. They will be engaged with the challenges of contemporary society and with knowledge and ideas. We want our graduates to have respect for diversity, to be open-minded, sensitive to others and inclusive, and to be open to other cultures and perspectives: they should have a level of cultural literacy. Our graduates should be aware of disadvantage and social justice, and be willing to participate to help create a wiser and better society.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Assessment task

  • Active Collaboration

Socially and Environmentally Active and Responsible

We want our graduates to be aware of and have respect for self and others; to be able to work with others as a leader and a team player; to have a sense of connectedness with others and country; and to have a sense of mutual obligation. Our graduates should be informed and active participants in moving society towards sustainability.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Reflect on and articulate discipline specific skills and graduate capabilities and their potential application beyond University
  • Build and consolidate communication skills (written, oral, interpersonal)
  • Work independently and collaboratively to solve problems and find creative solutions

Assessment tasks

  • Individual Debate Thesis
  • Debating Cup
  • Active Collaboration

Commitment to Continuous Learning

Our graduates will have enquiring minds and a literate curiosity which will lead them to pursue knowledge for its own sake. They will continue to pursue learning in their careers and as they participate in the world. They will be capable of reflecting on their experiences and relationships with others and the environment, learning from them, and growing - personally, professionally and socially.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Synthesise and integrate knowledge from multiple topic areas
  • Understand what historical literacy is

Changes since First Published

Date Description
15/06/2018 I made some changes to the assessment section to make the instructions clearer and more comprehensive and added some instructions into the Delivery and Resources section, to factor in exigencies for OUA students.