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AHIX254 – The Dead Sea Scrolls: Context and Content

2018 – S2 OUA

General Information

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Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit Convenor
Kyle Keimer
Unit Convenor
Christopher Forbes
Contact via email
Edward Bridge
Prerequisites Prerequisites
Corequisites Corequisites
Co-badged status Co-badged status
Unit description Unit description
Since their first discovery in 1946 the Dead Sea Scrolls have been a constant focus of interest and intrigue. What did the first century sect that produced and transmitted these scrolls actually believe? What sort of Judaism was it? What was the sect's relationship to Christianity? Were the modern authorities withholding publication? We will study in detail the most important texts of the sect and contextualise them against the historical movements and trends that transformed the centuries that we now call the second Temple Period, a period out of which both Judaism and Christianity were to emerge. All enrolment queries should be directed to Open Universities Australia (OUA): see www.open.edu.au

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at https://www.open.edu.au/student-admin-and-support/key-dates/

Learning Outcomes

  1. Understand the political, social and religious developments in Palestine from the Persian through to the Roman periods
  2. Understand in depth the ancient sources (literary, documentary and epigraphic) that relate to Jewish communities, Jewish values and attitudes, and the events that occurred in the period of time in question
  3. Synthesise the knowledge by relating different ancient sources to find common themes, viewpoints and attitudes that can be thought to be characteristic of Jews in Palestine in this period. This includes the critical use of current methodologies within the discipline of practice
  4. Critically evaluate scholarship on the ancient sources, focusing on such aspects as: use of and interaction with ancient sources; discerning and critiquing methodology and its impact on the arguments and conclusions presented; and bias (overt or hidden)
  5. Present findings in a professional manner, through developed written and/or oral communication skills

General Assessment Information

All assessments will be submitted using Turnitin links on the iLearn page. The Turnitin submission procedure can be found at: http://www.mq.edu.au/courses/open_universities_australia/welcome_to_online_learning/assignment_submission_procedure/turnitin_assignment_submission_procedure/

Access to the internet and the ability to download and/or view unit materials are essential. Ability to work with word processing software is required for written assessments. Any technical issue encountered with accessing unit materials and/or with submitting assignments should be directed to the IT department via ask.mq.edu.au. After lodging a complaint/request with them you must also notify me via email concerning the issue as soon as possible after it is discovered. Contacting me after an assessment's due date to say that you could not submit it on time will not result in an extension for that assessment unless IT provides me with a time-stamped notice.

Assignments will be assessed on their level of completion, coherence, grammar, and comprehension. A fuller set of guidelines for each assessment is provided above and/or will be provided in class/online at a later point in time.

Assessment tasks / assignments are compulsory and must be submitted on time. Extensions for assignments can only be granted for medical reasons or on compassionate grounds. Without documentation (medical or counselling certificates) or prior staff approval, late work will not be accepted. If required, applications for extensions should be made to me before the assignment's due date. No assignments will be accepted after assignments have been corrected and feedback has been provided (see also the clause below).

Unless a Special Consideration request has been submitted and approved, (a) a penalty for lateness will apply – two (2) marks out of 100 will be deducted per day for assignments submitted after the due date – and (b) no assignment will be accepted more than seven (7) days (incl. weekends) after the original submission deadline. No late submissions will be accepted for timed assessments – e.g. quizzes, online tests.

Assignment tasks handed in early will not be marked and returned before the due date.

For Special Consideration Policy see under Policies and Procedures.

Note on Assessment - To complete the unit satisfactorily you will need to achieve an overall mark worth 50% or above. 

IMPORTANT NOTE ON FINAL MARKS: Please note with respect to the marks you receive for work during the session: that the marks given are indicative only; final marks will be determined after moderation. See further the note on Results in the Policies and Procedures section below.

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Hurdle Due
Tutorial Paper 1 20% No Sunday of Week 3
Tutorial Paper 2 20% No Sunday of Week 11
Essay 60% No Sunday of Week 13

Tutorial Paper 1

Due: Sunday of Week 3
Weighting: 20%

Tutorial paper of 750 words. Students have a choice of one of Weeks' 2 to 3 tutorial topics


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Understand the political, social and religious developments in Palestine from the Persian through to the Roman periods
  • Understand in depth the ancient sources (literary, documentary and epigraphic) that relate to Jewish communities, Jewish values and attitudes, and the events that occurred in the period of time in question
  • Synthesise the knowledge by relating different ancient sources to find common themes, viewpoints and attitudes that can be thought to be characteristic of Jews in Palestine in this period. This includes the critical use of current methodologies within the discipline of practice
  • Critically evaluate scholarship on the ancient sources, focusing on such aspects as: use of and interaction with ancient sources; discerning and critiquing methodology and its impact on the arguments and conclusions presented; and bias (overt or hidden)
  • Present findings in a professional manner, through developed written and/or oral communication skills

Tutorial Paper 2

Due: Sunday of Week 11
Weighting: 20%

Tutorial paper of 750 words. Students have a choice of one of Weeks' 4 to 11 tutorial topics


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Understand the political, social and religious developments in Palestine from the Persian through to the Roman periods
  • Understand in depth the ancient sources (literary, documentary and epigraphic) that relate to Jewish communities, Jewish values and attitudes, and the events that occurred in the period of time in question
  • Synthesise the knowledge by relating different ancient sources to find common themes, viewpoints and attitudes that can be thought to be characteristic of Jews in Palestine in this period. This includes the critical use of current methodologies within the discipline of practice
  • Critically evaluate scholarship on the ancient sources, focusing on such aspects as: use of and interaction with ancient sources; discerning and critiquing methodology and its impact on the arguments and conclusions presented; and bias (overt or hidden)
  • Present findings in a professional manner, through developed written and/or oral communication skills

Essay

Due: Sunday of Week 13
Weighting: 60%

Essay of 2500 words. Students have a choice of topics


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Understand the political, social and religious developments in Palestine from the Persian through to the Roman periods
  • Understand in depth the ancient sources (literary, documentary and epigraphic) that relate to Jewish communities, Jewish values and attitudes, and the events that occurred in the period of time in question
  • Synthesise the knowledge by relating different ancient sources to find common themes, viewpoints and attitudes that can be thought to be characteristic of Jews in Palestine in this period. This includes the critical use of current methodologies within the discipline of practice
  • Critically evaluate scholarship on the ancient sources, focusing on such aspects as: use of and interaction with ancient sources; discerning and critiquing methodology and its impact on the arguments and conclusions presented; and bias (overt or hidden)
  • Present findings in a professional manner, through developed written and/or oral communication skills

Delivery and Resources

The unit looks at the history of the Judeans (Jewish people) in the Second Temple Period, which runs from the late sixth century BCE to the fall of Jerusalem and destruction of the temple in 70 CE. The Bible, documentary evidence and archaeology are used to critically assess the developments in this period. Particular focus will be placed on the Dead Sea Scrolls as new insights into the Second Temple Period were afforded with the discoveries at Qumran. We look at the beliefs and literature of the community and what this tells us about them and their place in the Judaism of the times. All documents are read in English translation.

Required Reading

Vermès, G. (ed. & trans.), The Complete Dead Sea Scrolls in English (London: Penguin Books, 2004 or 2012)

 

Recommended Reading

The Bible with Apocrypha (New Revised Translation is preferred)

Collins, John J., and Daniel C. Harlow, eds. Early Judaism: A Comprehensive Overview. Grand Rapids, MI: Eerdmans, 2012.

Meyers, Eric M. and Mark Chancey, Alexander to Constantine: Archaeology of the Land of the Bible, Volume III. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2012.

García Martínez, Florentino. The Dead Sea Scrolls Translated. 2nd ed. Grand Rapids, MI: Eerdmans, 1996. 

Josephus, Flavius. The New Complete Works of Josephus. Translated by William Whiston. Grand Rapids, MI: Kregel, 1999. [You may use another edition, but it should have both Antiquities and War] 

 

Unit webpage and technology used and required

Online units can be accessed at: http://ilearn.mq.edu.au/

PC and Internet access are required. Basic computer skills (e.g., internet browsing) and skills in word processing are also a requirement.

Please contact teaching staff for any further, more specific requirements. Consult the OUA website for more detailed information on technology requirements:

http://www.open.edu.au/public/future-students/getting-started/computer-requirements

 

 

Unit Schedule

Weekly schedule

Week 1

Content: The Discovery of the Dead Sea Scrolls

Context: Jewish Exile and Return (587-530 BCE)

Week 2

Content: The Community Rule (1QS)

Context: The Persian Period (539-330 BCE)

Week 3

Content: The Calendar at Qumran

Context: The Ptolemaic Period (330-198 BCE)

Week 4

Content: The Qumran Bible

Context: The Septuagint (LXX)

Week 5

Content: The Damascus Document (CD)

Context: The Seleucid Period (198-167 BCE)

Week 6

Content: The Damascus Document (CD) (Continued)

Context: The Maccabaean Revolt and the Hasmonaean Kingdom (167-63 BCE)

Week 7

Content: Biblical Interpretation at Qumran, including Pesher

Context: Apocalyptic Literature, Joseph and Asenath

Week 8

Content: The Temple Scroll (11QT)

Context: The Herods (63 BCE onwards)

Week 9

Content: The Identity of the Qumran Community

Context: Pharisees, others and the Jewish Law

Week 10

Content: The War Scroll (1QM)

Context: The First Jewish Revolt (66-70 CE)

Week 11

Content: Community Rule

Context: Masada (70-74 CE)

Week 12

Content: Christianity and Qumran (Essenes, John the Baptist and Jesus of Nazareth)

Context: The Jewish Diaspora

Week 13

No Lectures

Policies and Procedures

Late Submission - applies unless otherwise stated elsewhere in the unit guide

Unless a Special Consideration request has been submitted and approved, (a) a penalty for lateness will apply – two (2) marks out of 100 will be deducted per day for assignments submitted after the due date – and (b) no assignment will be accepted more than seven (7) days (incl. weekends) after the original submission deadline. No late submissions will be accepted for timed assessments – e.g. quizzes, online tests.

Extension Request

Special Consideration Policy and Procedure (https://staff.mq.edu.au/work/strategy-planning-and-governance/university-policies-and-procedures/policies/special-consideration)

The University recognises that students may experience events or conditions that adversely affect their academic performance. If you experience serious and unavoidable difficulties at exam time or when assessment tasks are due, you can consider applying for Special Consideration.

You need to show that the circumstances:

  1. were serious, unexpected and unavoidable
  2. were beyond your control
  3. caused substantial disruption to your academic work
  4. substantially interfered with your otherwise satisfactory fulfilment of the unit requirements
  5. lasted at least three consecutive days or a total of 5 days within the teaching period and prevented completion of an assessment task scheduled for a specific date.

If you feel that your studies have been impacted submit an application as follows:

  1. Visit Ask MQ and use your OneID to log in
  2. Fill in your relevant details
  3. Attach supporting documents by clicking 'Add a reply', click 'Browse' and navigating to the files you want to attach, then click 'Submit Form' to send your notification and supporting documents
  4. Please keep copies of your original documents, as they may be requested in the future as part of the assessment process

Outcome

Once your submission is assessed, an appropriate outcome will be organised.

OUA Specific Policies and Procedures

Withdrawal from a unit after the census date

You can withdraw from your subjects prior to the census date (last day to withdraw). If you successfully withdraw before the census date, you won’t need to apply for Special Circumstances. If you find yourself unable to withdraw from your subjects before the census date - you might be able to apply for Special Circumstances. If you’re eligible, we can refund your fees and overturn your fail grade.

If you’re studying Single Subjects using FEE-HELP or paying up front, you can apply online.

If you’re studying a degree using HECS-HELP, you’ll need to apply directly to Macquarie University.

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central (https://staff.mq.edu.au/work/strategy-planning-and-governance/university-policies-and-procedures/policy-central). Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Undergraduate students seeking more policy resources can visit the Student Policy Gateway (https://students.mq.edu.au/support/study/student-policy-gateway). It is your one-stop-shop for the key policies you need to know about throughout your undergraduate student journey.

If you would like to see all the policies relevant to Learning and Teaching visit Policy Central (https://staff.mq.edu.au/work/strategy-planning-and-governance/university-policies-and-procedures/policy-central).

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/study/getting-started/student-conduct​

Results

Results shown in iLearn, or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent. For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au.

OUA Specific Policies and Procedures

Extension Request Procedure

The granting of extensions of up to one week are at the discretion of the unit convener.  Any requests for extensions must be made in writing before the due date for the submission of the assessment task.  Extensions beyond one week is subject to the University's Disruptions Policy.

Disruption to Studies

If you require an extension of longer than seven (7) days you will be required to submit a 'Disruption to Studies' Notification. Please follow the procedure below:

  1. Visit https://ask.mq.edu.au/account/forms/display/disruptions and use your OneID to log in.
  2. Select your OUA unit code from the drop down list and fill in your relevant details. Note: A notification needs to be submitted for each unit you believe is affected by the disruption.
  3. Click "Submit form".
  4. Attach supporting documents by clicking 'Add a note/attachment', click 'browse' and navigating to the files you want to attach, then click 'submit note' to send your notification and supporting documents
  5. Please keep copies of your original documents, as they may be requested in the future as part of the assessment process

Please ensure that supporting documentation is included with your request.

Notify your lecturer via your iLearn dialogue box if you are submitting a 'Disruption to Studies' Notification.

Your request will be considered once all the documentation has been received.

If you have issues, please contact your convenor via the dialogue tool immediately.

Extensions are granted only on grounds of illness or misadventure, and appropriate supporting documentation must be submitted. Work submitted after 3 weeks beyond the due date, or the date after which an extension has been given, will not be accepted. If you are having problems completing an assignment, please contact the tutor as early as possible.

OUA Special Circumstances Process

Special Circumstances refers to late withdrawal from a unit and your request to have your circumstances taken into account for a possible refund of fees and removal of a "fail" result.

Applications for Special Circumstances are to be submitted to Open Universities Australia directly:

https://www.open.edu.au/public/student-admin-and-support/student-support-services/special-circumstances

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Learning Skills

Learning Skills (mq.edu.au/learningskills) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to improve your marks and take control of your study.

Student Enquiry Service

For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at ask.mq.edu.au

Equity Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

IT Help

For help with University computer systems and technology, visit http://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/information_technology/help/

When using the University's IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use of IT Resources Policy. The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network including students.

Graduate Capabilities

Creative and Innovative

Our graduates will also be capable of creative thinking and of creating knowledge. They will be imaginative and open to experience and capable of innovation at work and in the community. We want them to be engaged in applying their critical, creative thinking.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • Synthesise the knowledge by relating different ancient sources to find common themes, viewpoints and attitudes that can be thought to be characteristic of Jews in Palestine in this period. This includes the critical use of current methodologies within the discipline of practice

Assessment tasks

  • Tutorial Paper 1
  • Tutorial Paper 2
  • Essay

Engaged and Ethical Local and Global citizens

As local citizens our graduates will be aware of indigenous perspectives and of the nation's historical context. They will be engaged with the challenges of contemporary society and with knowledge and ideas. We want our graduates to have respect for diversity, to be open-minded, sensitive to others and inclusive, and to be open to other cultures and perspectives: they should have a level of cultural literacy. Our graduates should be aware of disadvantage and social justice, and be willing to participate to help create a wiser and better society.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Understand in depth the ancient sources (literary, documentary and epigraphic) that relate to Jewish communities, Jewish values and attitudes, and the events that occurred in the period of time in question
  • Synthesise the knowledge by relating different ancient sources to find common themes, viewpoints and attitudes that can be thought to be characteristic of Jews in Palestine in this period. This includes the critical use of current methodologies within the discipline of practice
  • Critically evaluate scholarship on the ancient sources, focusing on such aspects as: use of and interaction with ancient sources; discerning and critiquing methodology and its impact on the arguments and conclusions presented; and bias (overt or hidden)

Socially and Environmentally Active and Responsible

We want our graduates to be aware of and have respect for self and others; to be able to work with others as a leader and a team player; to have a sense of connectedness with others and country; and to have a sense of mutual obligation. Our graduates should be informed and active participants in moving society towards sustainability.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Understand in depth the ancient sources (literary, documentary and epigraphic) that relate to Jewish communities, Jewish values and attitudes, and the events that occurred in the period of time in question
  • Critically evaluate scholarship on the ancient sources, focusing on such aspects as: use of and interaction with ancient sources; discerning and critiquing methodology and its impact on the arguments and conclusions presented; and bias (overt or hidden)

Commitment to Continuous Learning

Our graduates will have enquiring minds and a literate curiosity which will lead them to pursue knowledge for its own sake. They will continue to pursue learning in their careers and as they participate in the world. They will be capable of reflecting on their experiences and relationships with others and the environment, learning from them, and growing - personally, professionally and socially.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Synthesise the knowledge by relating different ancient sources to find common themes, viewpoints and attitudes that can be thought to be characteristic of Jews in Palestine in this period. This includes the critical use of current methodologies within the discipline of practice
  • Critically evaluate scholarship on the ancient sources, focusing on such aspects as: use of and interaction with ancient sources; discerning and critiquing methodology and its impact on the arguments and conclusions presented; and bias (overt or hidden)

Assessment tasks

  • Tutorial Paper 1
  • Tutorial Paper 2
  • Essay

Problem Solving and Research Capability

Our graduates should be capable of researching; of analysing, and interpreting and assessing data and information in various forms; of drawing connections across fields of knowledge; and they should be able to relate their knowledge to complex situations at work or in the world, in order to diagnose and solve problems. We want them to have the confidence to take the initiative in doing so, within an awareness of their own limitations.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • Synthesise the knowledge by relating different ancient sources to find common themes, viewpoints and attitudes that can be thought to be characteristic of Jews in Palestine in this period. This includes the critical use of current methodologies within the discipline of practice

Assessment tasks

  • Tutorial Paper 1
  • Tutorial Paper 2
  • Essay

Effective Communication

We want to develop in our students the ability to communicate and convey their views in forms effective with different audiences. We want our graduates to take with them the capability to read, listen, question, gather and evaluate information resources in a variety of formats, assess, write clearly, speak effectively, and to use visual communication and communication technologies as appropriate.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • Present findings in a professional manner, through developed written and/or oral communication skills

Assessment tasks

  • Tutorial Paper 1
  • Tutorial Paper 2
  • Essay

Capable of Professional and Personal Judgement and Initiative

We want our graduates to have emotional intelligence and sound interpersonal skills and to demonstrate discernment and common sense in their professional and personal judgement. They will exercise initiative as needed. They will be capable of risk assessment, and be able to handle ambiguity and complexity, enabling them to be adaptable in diverse and changing environments.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Synthesise the knowledge by relating different ancient sources to find common themes, viewpoints and attitudes that can be thought to be characteristic of Jews in Palestine in this period. This includes the critical use of current methodologies within the discipline of practice
  • Critically evaluate scholarship on the ancient sources, focusing on such aspects as: use of and interaction with ancient sources; discerning and critiquing methodology and its impact on the arguments and conclusions presented; and bias (overt or hidden)

Assessment tasks

  • Tutorial Paper 1
  • Tutorial Paper 2
  • Essay

Discipline Specific Knowledge and Skills

Our graduates will take with them the intellectual development, depth and breadth of knowledge, scholarly understanding, and specific subject content in their chosen fields to make them competent and confident in their subject or profession. They will be able to demonstrate, where relevant, professional technical competence and meet professional standards. They will be able to articulate the structure of knowledge of their discipline, be able to adapt discipline-specific knowledge to novel situations, and be able to contribute from their discipline to inter-disciplinary solutions to problems.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Understand the political, social and religious developments in Palestine from the Persian through to the Roman periods
  • Understand in depth the ancient sources (literary, documentary and epigraphic) that relate to Jewish communities, Jewish values and attitudes, and the events that occurred in the period of time in question
  • Synthesise the knowledge by relating different ancient sources to find common themes, viewpoints and attitudes that can be thought to be characteristic of Jews in Palestine in this period. This includes the critical use of current methodologies within the discipline of practice
  • Critically evaluate scholarship on the ancient sources, focusing on such aspects as: use of and interaction with ancient sources; discerning and critiquing methodology and its impact on the arguments and conclusions presented; and bias (overt or hidden)

Assessment tasks

  • Tutorial Paper 1
  • Tutorial Paper 2
  • Essay

Critical, Analytical and Integrative Thinking

We want our graduates to be capable of reasoning, questioning and analysing, and to integrate and synthesise learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments; to be able to critique constraints, assumptions and limitations; to be able to think independently and systemically in relation to scholarly activity, in the workplace, and in the world. We want them to have a level of scientific and information technology literacy.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Understand the political, social and religious developments in Palestine from the Persian through to the Roman periods
  • Understand in depth the ancient sources (literary, documentary and epigraphic) that relate to Jewish communities, Jewish values and attitudes, and the events that occurred in the period of time in question
  • Synthesise the knowledge by relating different ancient sources to find common themes, viewpoints and attitudes that can be thought to be characteristic of Jews in Palestine in this period. This includes the critical use of current methodologies within the discipline of practice
  • Critically evaluate scholarship on the ancient sources, focusing on such aspects as: use of and interaction with ancient sources; discerning and critiquing methodology and its impact on the arguments and conclusions presented; and bias (overt or hidden)

Assessment tasks

  • Tutorial Paper 1
  • Tutorial Paper 2
  • Essay