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AHIS211 – Ciceronian Rome

2018 – S2 Day

General Information

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Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit Convenor and Lecturer
Lea Beness
Contact via By email or in person after class
Australian Hearing Hub, Level 2
For personal consultation please email for an appointment
Lecturer
Tom Hillard
Lecturer
Caillan Davenport
Credit points Credit points
3
Prerequisites Prerequisites
AHIS110 or AHST103
Corequisites Corequisites
Co-badged status Co-badged status
Unit description Unit description
This unit examines the social and political history of the age of Gaius Julius Caesar: the so-called last generation of the Roman Republic. It looks at Rome as a society in transition and closes with an examination of Rome's political transformation with the dictatorship of Caesar and the rise of his son and heir Octavian (Augustus). Along the way the unit investigates such topics as: the nature of political competition and the growth of violence, Pompey's great commands, rhetoric, religion, the role of women, slavery, and the changing architectural landscape of Rome itself and probes such abiding issues as the ethics of murder.

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at https://students.mq.edu.au/important-dates

Learning Outcomes

  1. expand and build upon your prior knowledge of the Roman republican political process
  2. demonstrate your skill in evaluating source material and, in particular, your ability to critically use ancient sources and evaluate modern interpretations of those sources
  3. formulate arguments and articulate ideas in a written and oral form at a more sophisticated level than you did at 100-level
  4. demonstrate an appreciation of the larger issues which engage historians
  5. emerge with an enthusiasm for Roman History intact and, hopefully, enhanced

General Assessment Information

All the written assessment tasks are compulsory components of this unit and must be submitted on time.

Guidelines for the assessment tasks, assessment criteria (rubrics), and standards for grading each of the tasks are available on the unit iLearn site.

 

1. SELF-ASSESSMENT EXERCISE: This exercise is compulsory but does not count towards your final grade.

You will provide ten short answers based on questions which relate to the first six lectures at the end of Week 3. Feedback will be provided in lectures in the following week.

One of the aims of this exercise is to measure your understanding of the Roman republican political process which will form the basis for your future study of the political evolution of the Roman state during the period of Cicero's lifetime. It will also serve as a guide to the sort of questions that will be asked in the Short-Answer section of the Examination.

It is due to be submitted on Friday August 17th by 11.59pm.

 

2. TUTORIAL PAPER: Topics for discussion and assignment questions are set out under the relevant weeks on the unit's iLearn site. ONE written assignment (tutorial paper) is to be submitted for assessment. It will count for 15% of the final mark. (Preparation for each tutorial, however, is strongly advised, since the material covered in tutorials will be examined and will count towards the participation mark.) Assignments must be submitted as a pdf via Turnitin on the iLearn site BEFORE the relevant tutorial. (For external students the paper must be submitted before 9am on the Monday morning of the relevant week's discussion.) Tutorial papers will NOT be accepted after tutorial discussion in the classroom (or on the External Forum) has taken place. Students are advised strongly to submit a tutorial paper by the mid-session break.

The appropriate length of tutorial assignments will vary with the topic but should not exceed 1000 words. The assignment is not necessarily to be regarded as a mini-essay. What is often required are succinct, sharply focused and tightly expressed answers to the particular questions set. The paper must be documented and based on a direct examination of the ancient sources. If modern scholarship is used, a bibliography should be attached (see the short Style Guide available on the unit iLearn site). To reiterate and clarify, I will be assessing the degree to which you answer the question/s set (within the word limit), the degree to which you cite the ancient evidence in support of your arguments and the clarity of your presentation and written expression. Marking rubrics and guidelines for referencing will be provided on the unit's iLearn site.

3. ESSAY: One essay, counting for 35% of the final mark, is required. It should not exceed 2000 words. IT IS DUE ON FRIDAY OCTOBER 5TH by 11.59pm. Topics and marking criteria will be handed out early in the session. Marking rubrics and guidelines for referencing will also be provided on the iLearn site.

 

4. EXAMINATION:

There is a two-hour examination worth 40% of the final assessment. It will include:

* a range of passages for discussion (drawn from the passages that will be studied in lectures and tutorials);

* a set of ten short-answer questions testing your knowledge of the Roman political system and the significant dates and events of the period (worth 10% of the overall examination mark);

* a compulsory question (which is here pre-circulated): Was Brutus right?

The question seems simple; the answer is anything but. We shall discuss its various ramifications as the course progresses.

Important: The University Examination period in 2nd session 2018 is from 12th of November to 30th of November.

You are expected to present yourself for examination at the time and place designated in the University Examination Timetable. The timetable will be available in draft form approximately eight weeks before the commencement of the examinations and in final form approximately four weeks before the commencement of the examinations at: <http://students.mq.edu.au/ student_admin/timetables>.

The only exception to sitting an examination at the designated time is because of documented illness or unavoidable disruption. In these circumstances you may wish to consider applying for Special Consideration. You are advised that it is Macquarie University policy not to set early examinations for individuals or groups of students. All students are expected to ensure that they are available until the end of the teaching semester, that is, the final day of the official examination period.

 

5. ACTIVE PARTICIPATION: In order to receive full marks for participation (worth 10% of the overall grade), students must consistently demonstrate their commitment to the course by being well-prepared for all classes, and completing any required tutorial reading and discussion preparation. Active participation is assessed by a student’s engagement in activities such as discussions facilitated by the lecturer/tutor, contributions to online discussion forums, or general questions asked during lectures or tutorials and involvement in set activities. Participation is expected to be well considered and relevant to the unit of study. Please note that attendance alone cannot be assessed. Students are also expected to show consideration for fellow classmates and teaching staff by behaving in a considerate and mature manner.

 

GRADING:

The grade a student receives will signify their overall performance in meeting the learning outcomes of the unit. Grades will not be awarded by reference to the achievement of other students nor allocated to fit a predetermined distribution. In determining a grade, due weight will be given to the learning outcomes and level of the unit. Markers in the unit will use the following grades:

HD = High Distinction 85–100

D = Distinction 75–84

Cr = Credit 65–74

P = Pass 50–64

F = Fail 0–49  

 

ASSIGNMENT SUBMISSION AND RETURN

All written work (apart from that undertaken in the examination) must be submitted through the iLearn website. Please upload your assignment to the drop-box under the relevant week. Save your assignment as a pdf file. All assignment files should be saved with your full name in the label of the file. All assignments should include the following at the start: Student name; Student number; Assessment Task Title or Question.

The Tutorial Paper and Major Essay will be returned via the Turnitin tool on the iLearn site and will contain feedback from the marker. Every effort will be made to return assignments in a timely fashion. Information about how to submit work online can be accessed through the iLearn site.

I will endeavour to return tutorial papers by the time of the next tutorial though this may not always be possible.

Staff will also endeavour to return essays by the end of the session.

Over the course of AHIS211 your work will be marked by at least two members of staff.

N.B. (NOTA BENE), i.e. NOTE WELL: You should always keep a copy of completed assignment tasks in case of loss.

 

EXTENSIONS AND PENALTIES FOR LATE SUBMISSION OF ASSESSMENT TASKS

Extensions for assignments can only be granted for serious and unavoidable disruptions that arise after a study period has commenced and may only be sought with the support of documentary evidence. If you anticipate any difficulty in meeting due dates for assignments then it is important that you contact the unit convenor as early as possible and before the deadline. Unless a Special Consideration request has been submitted and approved, (a) a penalty for lateness will apply – two (2) marks out of 100 will be deducted per day for assignments submitted after the due date – and (b) no assignment will be accepted more than seven (7) days (incl. weekends) after the original submission deadline. No late submissions will be accepted for timed assessments – e.g. quizzes, online tests.  

 

SPECIAL CONSIDERATION

The granting of extensions is subject to the University's Special Consideration Policy.

A student who has experienced unexpected, unavoidable, and serious circumstances affecting their assessable work may lodge an application for Special Consideration.

Applications will only be accepted in the following circumstances:

  • where academic work has been hampered to a substantial degree by illness or other cause; and
  • the circumstances are serious and unavoidable and beyond the student’s control; and
  • the application for Special Consideration is lodged no later than five (5) working days after the assessment task due date or examination date.

https://staff.mq.edu.au/work/strategy-planning-and-governance/university-policies-and-procedures/policies/special-consideration

 

ASSIGNMENT LENGTH

Markers will not read assignments which are more than 10% over the specified word length. Please note that footnotes and bibliography do not count in the word length in this particular unit. (You should not expect that this will be the case in other units that you are undertaking.)

 

IMPORTANT NOTE ON FINAL MARKS

Please note with respect to the marks you receive for work during the session: the marks given are indicative only; final marks will be determined after moderation. See further the note on Results in the Policies and Procedures section below.

 

DIFFICULTIES

If you have any difficulties submitting assessments, please do not hesitate to contact the unit convenor: lea.beness@mq.edu.au

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Hurdle Due
Self-assessment Exercise 0% No Friday of Week 3
Tutorial Paper 15% No Before relevant tutorial
Major Essay 35% No Friday of Week 8 by 11.59 pm
Examination 40% No Formal Examination Period
Participation 10% No Throughout the unit

Self-assessment Exercise

Due: Friday of Week 3
Weighting: 0%

You will provide ten short answers based on questions which relate to the first six lectures in the course. The questions will, in part, touch upon your understanding of the Roman political process. This exercise is compulsory but does not have an assessment weighting.

You will self-assess your responses against the answers and feedback that I shall provide in the lectures of Week 4.

Your answers will be submitted electronically in a pdf file using the Turnitin portal under Week 3 on the unit's iLearn website. This quiz will help prepare you for the short-answer questions in the examination at the end of the session.

Another aim of this exercise is for you to see how you are progressing in the unit. You might ask yourself:

  • What have I learned about Ciceronian Rome so far in this unit?
  • Do I have a basic understanding of the way in which Roman government worked after the reforms of Sulla?
  • Am I confident that I can now use this knowledge to move on to a study of the way in which the Roman state changed in the period we shall now study?
  • How could I improve my approach?

The exercise is due on Friday 17th August by 11.59pm.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • expand and build upon your prior knowledge of the Roman republican political process

Tutorial Paper

Due: Before relevant tutorial
Weighting: 15%

Each week's tutorial discussion will focus on set ancient texts. One tutorial paper not less than 600 words and not longer than 1000 words must be submitted. (In this unit, footnotes do not count in the word length.)


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • expand and build upon your prior knowledge of the Roman republican political process
  • demonstrate your skill in evaluating source material and, in particular, your ability to critically use ancient sources and evaluate modern interpretations of those sources
  • formulate arguments and articulate ideas in a written and oral form at a more sophisticated level than you did at 100-level
  • emerge with an enthusiasm for Roman History intact and, hopefully, enhanced

Major Essay

Due: Friday of Week 8 by 11.59 pm
Weighting: 35%

Students must submit one 2000 word essay. (In this unit, footnotes do not count in the word length.)

Essay topics will be provided early in the session.

The essay is due on Friday 5th of October by 11.59pm.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • expand and build upon your prior knowledge of the Roman republican political process
  • demonstrate your skill in evaluating source material and, in particular, your ability to critically use ancient sources and evaluate modern interpretations of those sources
  • formulate arguments and articulate ideas in a written and oral form at a more sophisticated level than you did at 100-level
  • emerge with an enthusiasm for Roman History intact and, hopefully, enhanced

Examination

Due: Formal Examination Period
Weighting: 40%

There will be a two-hour examination.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • expand and build upon your prior knowledge of the Roman republican political process
  • demonstrate your skill in evaluating source material and, in particular, your ability to critically use ancient sources and evaluate modern interpretations of those sources
  • formulate arguments and articulate ideas in a written and oral form at a more sophisticated level than you did at 100-level
  • demonstrate an appreciation of the larger issues which engage historians

Participation

Due: Throughout the unit
Weighting: 10%

In order to receive full marks for participation, students must consistently demonstrate their commitment to the course through active participation in class, particularly tutorials. (For external students, this applies to participation in the online Discussion Forum.)


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • expand and build upon your prior knowledge of the Roman republican political process
  • demonstrate your skill in evaluating source material and, in particular, your ability to critically use ancient sources and evaluate modern interpretations of those sources
  • formulate arguments and articulate ideas in a written and oral form at a more sophisticated level than you did at 100-level
  • demonstrate an appreciation of the larger issues which engage historians
  • emerge with an enthusiasm for Roman History intact and, hopefully, enhanced

Delivery and Resources

CLASSES FOR INTERNAL STUDENTS

For lecture times and classrooms please consult the MQ Timetable website: <http://www.timetables.mq.edu.au>. This website will display up-to-date information on your classes and classroom locations.

Lectures: There are two lectures a week for most weeks of the semester. The importance of regular attendance and listening is that in the lectures we signal the topics that we deem significant. It is these topics which will be examined.

Tutorials: Topics for discussion and questions to be addressed are set out under the appropriate week on the iLearn site. There are tutorials for most weeks of the session. All tutorials will focus upon the historiographical aspects of studying this period. Preparation for each tutorial is advised, since the material covered in these sessions will be examined. Only by reading the material set for discussion in advance will you receive the full benefit of these sessions. I hope that participation in these discussions will be a vital and rewarding part of the unit.

 

EXPECTATIONS FOR EXTERNAL STUDENTS

Lectures: As for internal students, the lectures for this unit will be recorded and the audio recordings can be downloaded or streamed via the Echo 360 system which can be accessed via the iLearn site.

Tutorial: Topics for discussion and questions to be addressed are set out under the appropriate week on the iLearn site. You should use the Forum for External Students at the top of the iLearn site to discuss the tutorial questions posed each week. EXTERNAL STUDENTS WILL BE INVITED TO BEGIN DISCUSSION OF THE TUTORIAL QUESTIONS FROM 9AM ON THE RELEVANT WEEKS OF THE SESSION. All tutorials will focus upon the historiographical aspects of studying this period. Preparation for each tutorial is advised, since the material covered in these sessions will be examined. Only by reading the material set for discussion in advance will you receive the full benefit of the questions and issues discussed in the forum. There are tutorial topics set for most weeks of the session. I hope that participation in these discussions will be a vital and rewarding part of the unit.

 

REQUIRED READING AND TEXTS

(i) Ancient Sources

All students are expected to have a copy of the ancient sources listed below. All tutorial exercises which do not draw on material in the Unit Book of Readings (see below) will be based on source material in these works.

Cicero, Selected Letters (Penguin Classics)

Cicero, Selected Political Speeches (Penguin Classics)

Sallust, Catiline's Conspiracy, The Jugurthine War, Histories (Oxford World's Classics) OR Sallust, Catiline’s War, The Jugurthine War, Histories (Penguin Classics) OR Sallust, The Jugurthine War. The Conspiracy of Catiline (Penguin Classics)

Plutarch, Roman Lives (Oxford World’s Classics) OR Plutarch, The Fall of the Roman Republic (Penguin Classics)

Appian, The Civil Wars (Penguin Classics)

Other essential ancient sources to which reference will be made in the lectures have been compiled in a Book of Readings Ciceronian Rome which will be available for purchase at the Co-op at the beginning of the semester. Internal students should bring this booklet to all lectures and tutorials.

NOTE

In this course emphasis is placed upon the direct examination of the ancient sources and evidence. Students are expected to base all their work on a personal examination of these sources. It will not be sufficient simply to read modern studies on any topic, however sound and highly recommended these are: it will be essential to look first at the ancient sources on which all modern studies are necessarily based.

(ii) Modern Studies

A useful textbook account for the period will be found in H.H. Scullard, From the Gracchi to Nero (5th edition, 1982) whose notes on pp. 381ff. provide reference to more recent modern studies. It is highly recommended for background reading. A limited number of Scullard is available at the Co-op bookshop and an online version is available through the Library website.

Students may also find H. Swain and M.E. Davies, Aspects of Roman History, 82 BC–AD14. A Source-based Approach (Routledge, 2010) a useful narrative of events in this period.

A short paperback which provides an introduction to the Republic and Republican history—Michael Crawford, The Roman Republic (Fontana, 1978)—might be useful to students who are feeling a little rusty on this period. Again, for students needing a primer, David Shotter's The Fall of the Roman Republic (Routledge 1994, 2nd edition 2005) provides a simple narrative.

A very readable introduction to the period is W. Jeffrey Tatum’s Always I am Caesar (Oxford, Blackwell Publishing, 2008). A limited number of Tatum is available at the Co-op and the book is available online in the Library.

A stocktaking of modern scholarship and a useful summation of many of the problematic issues arising in this course will be found in M. Beard and M. Crawford Rome in the Late Republic. Problems and Interpretations (London, Duckworth, 1985). Even more recent introductions to various themes are provided by Harriet I. Flower (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to the Roman Republic (Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 2004) and Nathan Rosenstein and Robert Morstein-Marx (eds), A Companion to the Roman Republic (Oxford, Blackwell Publishing, 2006), both designed for readers new to the subject.

More detailed reading lists relating to particular topics will be provided on the iLearn site. The most important recommended books will be held in Reserve in the Library.

There are two essential works of reference for the course which may be consulted in the Library:

The Oxford Classical Dictionary (abbreviated OCD), multiple copies of which are held in the Library. It is also accessible online via the Library website. This is the standard work of reference in English for Roman and Greek history and culture. It provides reliable and succinct explanations and definitions of technical terms, summary biographies of prominent individuals, and accounts of institutions, etc.

T.R.S. Broughton The Magistrates of the Roman Republic (abbrev. MRR; 2 vols, 1951–2; Vol. 1 covers the period 509–100 BC; vol. 2 the period 99–31 BC), copies of which will be held in Reserve. This is an invaluable book which gives, year by year, a full, systematic list of the known political officials and magistrates, a summary of their actions in office and full references to the known ancient sources. A supplementary volume (vol. 3) was published in 1986. All volumes are accessible as e-books on the Library website.

Also to be regarded as a standard work of reference is J.A. Crook et al. (ed.), The Cambridge Ancient History vol. IX (2nd ed., Cambridge University Press, 1994).

TECHNOLOGY USED AND REQUIRED

The unit has an iLearn page which can be accessed at: <https://ilearn.mq.edu.au/login/MQ/>. PC and internet access are therefore required. Basic computer skills (e.g., internet browsing) and skills in word processing are also a requirement. Please consult teaching staff for any further, more specific requirements.

SATISFACTORY COMPLETION OF THE UNIT

It is expected that INTERNAL students attend lectures and tutorials and that they spend 9 hours per week on individual study and participation in class across the 15 weeks of the session. EXTERNAL students should devote the same time to the unit, listening to lectures through the Echo 360 system and participating in the discussion forum on the set tutorial topics online.

The importance of a regular commitment to the activities in the unit is reflected in the final examination in which questions are drawn directly from material covered in the lectures and tutorials.

Students will be expected to attempt each of the assessment tasks and will need to achieve an overall mark of 50% or above to complete the unit satisfactorily.

 

Unit Schedule

Please note that this schedule may be altered according to the availability of guest speakers.

 

Week 1

Lecture 1: Introduction to the Course

Lecture 2: An Introduction to Cicero: Looking back from 88 BC

Tutorial:  The first tutorial will be introductory (no preparation is required)

 

Week 2

Lecture 1: Cicero’s Early Life to 88 BC

Lecture 2: 88 BC

Tutorial: Roman Religion (especially in the time of Sulla)

 

Week 3

Lecture 1: The March on Rome to Sulla's Dictatorship

Lecture 2: The Sullan aftermath

                 The Seventies and Growing Discontent: What was the Ventus Popularis?

Tutorial: There are no tutorials this week but there will be a quiz on the first six lectures due at the end of the week (due Friday 17th August by 11.59pm)

 

Week 4

Lecture 1: Gladiators & Slaves I

Lecture 2: Gladiators & Slaves II

Tutorial: Pompey's Early Career

 

Week 5

Lecture 1: Who were the equites?

Lecture 2: Pompey's Great Commands, Cicero’s pro lege Manilia and the Mithridatic War

Tutorial: T. Pomponius Atticus

 

Week 6

Lecture 1: Pompey’s Return and Life in Ciceronian Rome

Lecture 2: The 'First Catilinarian Conspiracy' and the 'Catilinarian Conspiracy'

Tutorial: Caesar's Early Career

 

Week 7

Lecture 1: The 'Catilinarian Conspiracy', the Bona Dea Affair: the Politics of Enmity

Lecture 2: Cicero's Career to the late sixties BC

Tutorial: The Bona Dea and the Bona Dea Affair

_______________________________________________________________________________

Mid-semester Recess (two weeks)

_______________________________________________________________________________

Week 8

Friday October 5th: Essay Due

THERE ARE NO LECTURES OR TUTORIALS THIS WEEK

 

Week 9

Lecture 1: The Coalition of Caesar, Crassus and Pompey

Lecture 2: Caesar’s Gallic Wars

Tutorial: Cicero's Letters and Sallust: History and the Desire for Fame

 

Week 10

Lecture 1: The Post-Marian Army and Caesar's Gallic Wars

                 The Coalition of Caesar, Pompey and Crassus cont'd

Lecture 2: Exam Chat

                 The Breakdown of the Coalition and Civil Violence

Tutorial: Cicero's Letters: Relationships

 

Week 11

Lecture 1: Theatre in Life and Politics; Pompey's Theatre and the Urban Landscape

Lecture 2: The Culture of the Late Roman Republic: Literature, Philosophy and Rhetoric

Tutorial: The Wives of Pompey & Women in Politics

 

Week 12

Lecture 1: The Breakdown of the Coalition cont'd

Lecture 2: The Roman Civil Wars

Tutorial: Caesar's Assassination

 

Week 13

Lecture 1: Caesar’s Dictatorship

Lecture 2: The Triumvirate and the Death of Cicero and the Rise of Octavian

Tutorial:  There are no tutorials in the last week

Policies and Procedures

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central (https://staff.mq.edu.au/work/strategy-planning-and-governance/university-policies-and-procedures/policy-central). Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Undergraduate students seeking more policy resources can visit the Student Policy Gateway (https://students.mq.edu.au/support/study/student-policy-gateway). It is your one-stop-shop for the key policies you need to know about throughout your undergraduate student journey.

If you would like to see all the policies relevant to Learning and Teaching visit Policy Central (https://staff.mq.edu.au/work/strategy-planning-and-governance/university-policies-and-procedures/policy-central).

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/study/getting-started/student-conduct​

Results

Results shown in iLearn, or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent. For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au.

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Learning Skills

Learning Skills (mq.edu.au/learningskills) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to improve your marks and take control of your study.

Student Enquiry Service

For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at ask.mq.edu.au

Equity Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

IT Help

For help with University computer systems and technology, visit http://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/information_technology/help/

When using the University's IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use of IT Resources Policy. The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network including students.

Graduate Capabilities

Creative and Innovative

Our graduates will also be capable of creative thinking and of creating knowledge. They will be imaginative and open to experience and capable of innovation at work and in the community. We want them to be engaged in applying their critical, creative thinking.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Assessment tasks

  • Major Essay
  • Examination
  • Participation

Engaged and Ethical Local and Global citizens

As local citizens our graduates will be aware of indigenous perspectives and of the nation's historical context. They will be engaged with the challenges of contemporary society and with knowledge and ideas. We want our graduates to have respect for diversity, to be open-minded, sensitive to others and inclusive, and to be open to other cultures and perspectives: they should have a level of cultural literacy. Our graduates should be aware of disadvantage and social justice, and be willing to participate to help create a wiser and better society.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • demonstrate an appreciation of the larger issues which engage historians

Assessment task

  • Examination

Socially and Environmentally Active and Responsible

We want our graduates to be aware of and have respect for self and others; to be able to work with others as a leader and a team player; to have a sense of connectedness with others and country; and to have a sense of mutual obligation. Our graduates should be informed and active participants in moving society towards sustainability.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • demonstrate an appreciation of the larger issues which engage historians

Assessment task

  • Participation

Commitment to Continuous Learning

Our graduates will have enquiring minds and a literate curiosity which will lead them to pursue knowledge for its own sake. They will continue to pursue learning in their careers and as they participate in the world. They will be capable of reflecting on their experiences and relationships with others and the environment, learning from them, and growing - personally, professionally and socially.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • demonstrate an appreciation of the larger issues which engage historians
  • emerge with an enthusiasm for Roman History intact and, hopefully, enhanced

Problem Solving and Research Capability

Our graduates should be capable of researching; of analysing, and interpreting and assessing data and information in various forms; of drawing connections across fields of knowledge; and they should be able to relate their knowledge to complex situations at work or in the world, in order to diagnose and solve problems. We want them to have the confidence to take the initiative in doing so, within an awareness of their own limitations.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • demonstrate your skill in evaluating source material and, in particular, your ability to critically use ancient sources and evaluate modern interpretations of those sources
  • formulate arguments and articulate ideas in a written and oral form at a more sophisticated level than you did at 100-level
  • demonstrate an appreciation of the larger issues which engage historians

Assessment tasks

  • Tutorial Paper
  • Major Essay
  • Examination
  • Participation

Effective Communication

We want to develop in our students the ability to communicate and convey their views in forms effective with different audiences. We want our graduates to take with them the capability to read, listen, question, gather and evaluate information resources in a variety of formats, assess, write clearly, speak effectively, and to use visual communication and communication technologies as appropriate.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • formulate arguments and articulate ideas in a written and oral form at a more sophisticated level than you did at 100-level
  • demonstrate an appreciation of the larger issues which engage historians

Assessment tasks

  • Tutorial Paper
  • Major Essay
  • Examination
  • Participation

Capable of Professional and Personal Judgement and Initiative

We want our graduates to have emotional intelligence and sound interpersonal skills and to demonstrate discernment and common sense in their professional and personal judgement. They will exercise initiative as needed. They will be capable of risk assessment, and be able to handle ambiguity and complexity, enabling them to be adaptable in diverse and changing environments.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • demonstrate an appreciation of the larger issues which engage historians

Assessment tasks

  • Self-assessment Exercise
  • Participation

Discipline Specific Knowledge and Skills

Our graduates will take with them the intellectual development, depth and breadth of knowledge, scholarly understanding, and specific subject content in their chosen fields to make them competent and confident in their subject or profession. They will be able to demonstrate, where relevant, professional technical competence and meet professional standards. They will be able to articulate the structure of knowledge of their discipline, be able to adapt discipline-specific knowledge to novel situations, and be able to contribute from their discipline to inter-disciplinary solutions to problems.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • expand and build upon your prior knowledge of the Roman republican political process
  • demonstrate your skill in evaluating source material and, in particular, your ability to critically use ancient sources and evaluate modern interpretations of those sources
  • formulate arguments and articulate ideas in a written and oral form at a more sophisticated level than you did at 100-level
  • demonstrate an appreciation of the larger issues which engage historians

Assessment tasks

  • Self-assessment Exercise
  • Tutorial Paper
  • Major Essay
  • Examination
  • Participation

Critical, Analytical and Integrative Thinking

We want our graduates to be capable of reasoning, questioning and analysing, and to integrate and synthesise learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments; to be able to critique constraints, assumptions and limitations; to be able to think independently and systemically in relation to scholarly activity, in the workplace, and in the world. We want them to have a level of scientific and information technology literacy.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • demonstrate your skill in evaluating source material and, in particular, your ability to critically use ancient sources and evaluate modern interpretations of those sources
  • formulate arguments and articulate ideas in a written and oral form at a more sophisticated level than you did at 100-level
  • demonstrate an appreciation of the larger issues which engage historians

Assessment tasks

  • Self-assessment Exercise
  • Tutorial Paper
  • Major Essay
  • Examination
  • Participation

Changes from Previous Offering

This is the first time that the unit is being offered externally.

Students please note that the Special Consideration Policy is effective from December 4th 2017 and replaces the Disruption to Studies Policy.

Special Consideration Policy: https://staff.mq.edu.au/work/strategy-planning-and-governance/ university-policies-and-procedures/policies/special-consideration

There are new penalties for late submission which adhere to the required policy of the Faculty of Arts at Macquarie University.

Assignment Submission, Extensions and Penalties

ASSIGNMENT SUBMISSION

All written work (apart from that generated in the examination) must be submitted through the iLearn website. Please upload your assignment to the drop-box under the relevant week. Save your assignment as a pdf. All assignment files should be saved with your full name in the label of the file. All assignments should include the following at the start: Student name; Student number; Assessment Task Title or Question.

Information about how to submit work online can be accessed through the iLearn unit site.

 

ASSIGNMENT LENGTH

Markers will not read assignments which are more than 10% over the specified word length. Please note that footnotes and bibliography do not count in the word length in this particular unit. (You should not expect that this will be the case in other units that you are undertaking.)

 

ASSIGNMENT RETURN

Feedback on tutorial papers and major essays will be returned via the Turnitin tool on the iLearn Unit site and will contain feedback from the marker. Every effort will be made to return assignments in a timely fashion.

 

EXTENSIONS AND PENALTIES FOR LATE SUBMISSION OF ASSESSMENT TASKS

Extensions for assignments can only be granted for serious and unavoidable disruptions that arise after a study period has commenced and may only be sought with the support of documentary evidence. If you anticipate any difficulty in meeting due dates for assignments then it is important that you contact the unit convenor as early as possible and before the deadline. Unless a Special Consideration request has been submitted and approved, (a) a penalty for lateness will apply – two (2) marks out of 100 will be deducted per day for assignments submitted after the due date – and (b) no assignment will be accepted more than seven (7) days (incl. weekends) after the original submission deadline. No late submissions will be accepted for timed assessments – e.g. quizzes, online tests.

Changes since First Published

Date Description
13/07/2018 Some minor editing was done with regard to style.