Logo Students

ANTH205 – Islam

2018 – S2 Day

General Information

Pdf icon Download as PDF
Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff Course Convenor
Siobhan Irving
Contact via siobhan.irving@mq.edu.au
W6A 714
Siobhan Irving
Credit points Credit points
3
Prerequisites Prerequisites
ANTH150 or (12cp at 100 level or above) or admission to GDipArts
Corequisites Corequisites
Co-badged status Co-badged status
Unit description Unit description
Islam is a major world religion, and the anthropology of Islam an exciting enterprise that studies the lived experience of Islam and Muslims in a variety of contexts and different places. One unifying theme of the unit is its focus on the production of knowledge about Islam in the present, asking questions about who speaks for and in the name of Islam. This includes a stress on the representation and control of Islam, not just in the West but also in Muslim majority societies as well. Students are able to research a number of vital topics, including: media coverage of Islam; the fascinating debates around the category and form of the Islamic City; the production of Islam in the Museums of Islamic Art (from Istanbul to New York); Muslim cinema; Gender and Islam; the nationalisation of Islam by secular States such as Turkey; and Islam and Music.

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at https://students.mq.edu.au/important-dates

Learning Outcomes

  1. Apply the concerns of various anthropological perspectives and analyses to contemporary debates in and about Islam .
  2. Demonstrate knowledge of a number of significant historical developments and their continuing relevance for Islamic societies, as well as in understanding the everyday lives of Muslims.
  3. Discern and discuss the tensions and correspondences between political Islam, its representation in writing or film, and political processes in the ethnographers’ own society.
  4. Organize a verbal presentation in groups, and provide constructive input into the intellectual issues canvassed in the presentations of other groups.

General Assessment Information

Please type all essays. Major essay must be submitted on the due date or before through the gradebook system.

Extensions: any extensions must be requested in writing with valid documentation of their necessity (e.g. medical certificate). Any work that is submitted after the due date without an extension will be penalized at the standard rate of 1 percentage point per day.

Important Note: It is a requirement that all students keep a copy of their written work. In the event of work being lost, or if you have uploaded it but it is not in our records, you must be able to present a second copy. If you do not do so, no consideration can be given and all marks will be forfeited for that piece of work.

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Hurdle Due
Essay 40% No Week 9
Take-Home Exam 25% No Week 13
Group Project: Powerpoint Pres 15% No Over semester
Tutorial Participation 20% No Ongoing

Essay

Due: Week 9
Weighting: 40%

Students will write one essay for the course, choosing their topic from one of the major themes under discussion. Essay questions will be self-selected, but this selection will be facilitated by tutorial discussion. It is advisable (but not compulsory) that the essay be based on your tutorial group presentation. However,students will be required to write and submit their own essays. This essay should be approximately 2000 words.

The essay is due on Friday October 12th.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Apply the concerns of various anthropological perspectives and analyses to contemporary debates in and about Islam .
  • Demonstrate knowledge of a number of significant historical developments and their continuing relevance for Islamic societies, as well as in understanding the everyday lives of Muslims.
  • Discern and discuss the tensions and correspondences between political Islam, its representation in writing or film, and political processes in the ethnographers’ own society.

Take-Home Exam

Due: Week 13
Weighting: 25%

A take-home exam will be distributed at the Tuesday seminar on 30th October and will be due back in one week on 6th November, at the seminar. The exam will consist of a combination of short answer questions that link together topics and themes covered in lectures and tutorials throughout the course.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Apply the concerns of various anthropological perspectives and analyses to contemporary debates in and about Islam .
  • Demonstrate knowledge of a number of significant historical developments and their continuing relevance for Islamic societies, as well as in understanding the everyday lives of Muslims.
  • Discern and discuss the tensions and correspondences between political Islam, its representation in writing or film, and political processes in the ethnographers’ own society.

Group Project: Powerpoint Pres

Due: Over semester
Weighting: 15%

Group Project: Tutorial PowerPoint Presentation In the first week of tutorials, each student will be assigned a group and a topic (from weeks 4 to 12). Each group will need to collaborate on a tutorial presentation. All group members contribute to both the preparation of content and to the presentation itself. • A presentation accompanied by PowerPoint slides comprising a reflection on the required weekly reading highlighting and critically engaging with the issues and arguments raised in it. The presentation must be approximately 15 minutes long. • Presentations must link the reading to current or recent events, may engage respected news sources and blogs, and may include images. This will require some further research into the phenomena raised in the reading. • You are encouraged to also use SUPPLEMENTARY MATERIAL in your PowerPoint slides that could aid the class discussion. Eg:

  •  Statistics
  • News articles
  • Youtube clips
  • Infographics
  • Images / Cartoons / Artefacts

• Each presentation group must raise 3 questions to initiate class discussion and must also lead these discussions. It is expected all group members will actively engage in posing questions and interacting with these discussions.  • Groups must submit their PowerPoint slides (no more than 5 slides) to their tutor. The tutor will be active in helping facilitate the discussion with the presenters but the aim of the panel is to give you the opportunity to lead the discussion and engage your peers in the readings and lecture material. You will be graded based on the quality of your slides, your reflections, the questions you raise, and your ability to lead the discussion. Groups are also welcome to speak with the tutor before your allocated weeks to brainstorm ideas for your discussion points and relevant activities you might want to initiate with the class. Each group is allocated a single grade and it is thus incumbent upon all members to actively contribute.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Apply the concerns of various anthropological perspectives and analyses to contemporary debates in and about Islam .
  • Organize a verbal presentation in groups, and provide constructive input into the intellectual issues canvassed in the presentations of other groups.

Tutorial Participation

Due: Ongoing
Weighting: 20%

Tutorial preparation involves a couple of hours of pleasurable (!) reading a week. To facilitate tutorial discussion and to support fellow students, you are required to submit a one-page typed answer to the tutorial question for that week (see lecture and tutorial programme below).  Answers can only be submitted at the tutorial in which the reading is to be discussed. The tutorial mark will be awarded both on the basis of the written work (10%), as well as on tutorial participation (10%).


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Apply the concerns of various anthropological perspectives and analyses to contemporary debates in and about Islam .
  • Organize a verbal presentation in groups, and provide constructive input into the intellectual issues canvassed in the presentations of other groups.

Delivery and Resources

Classes

Anth 205 involves a two-hour seminar. Part of this weekly seminar will be used for lectures, part for films and part for  discussion. 

Students are also required to attend one of two weekly tutorials.

Required and Recommended Text and/or Materials

All readings for tutorial and all core articles for the seminar are found on the iLearn site. All other listed readings are on three-day loan (books) or e-reserve (journal articles).

Technology Used and Required

iLecture recordings of the class are found through the University’s On-Line Units System.

Teaching and Learning Strategy

Seminar Structure: Each week, the course convener will use the first half of the Tuesday seminar to sketch out and address the key issues under discussion and to situate the seminar readings. In the second half of the seminar we will often adopt a more flexible workshop format, in which students will discuss the subject or where we will view and interpret a film.

Tutorial:

  • Tutorial Group Presentation: Over the 13 weeks of the course students will make group presentations, each based on a selected set of readings. Depending on enrolment numbers, students will work with two or more partners to organize and deliver a 15 minute presentation. The presentations should be presented jointly and be organized in a single brief power-point format. Students have wide scope to plan how they divide up and summarize the relevant material. The purpose of the presentation is not to torture students but for the presenters to introduce to the class the key themes, puzzles or controversies of the readings. To facilitate tutorial participation and to help nervous student presenters, all other non-presenting students are expected to read for that tutorial.
  • Tutorial readings are intimately connected to the topics under discussion in the two-hour seminars. Sometimes the material approaches the relevant issue from a contrary direction; sometimes it places the subject in a different context or summarizes key themes. Students are expected to attend all tutorials and to be familiar with the assigned material, as well as participate in small group discussion or larger tutorial activities.

Unit Schedule

Lecture and Tutorial Programme

Week Lecture Tutorial
 

Part One: Critical Concepts: Origins, History and Experiences of Islam

The first three weeks of the course will introduce students to the basics of Islam, both as a religion and as a historical tradition.

 
1  Introduction to the Anthropology of Islam

 

2

 Islamic History, Belief and Rituals

 
3

 Excursion to Gallipoli Mosque, Auburn.

No tutorial this week.  

 No tutorial this week.
 

Part Two: Central Themes and Debates

The following weeks will be organized around a number of key themes or ‘problematics’, including debates around the representation of Islam (or Orientalism); on political Islam; on Islam and feminism; on gender and sexuality in Muslim communities; and on Islam and the arts (including Islamic music, fiction, cinema and aesthetics).

 
4  Studying Muslim Communities  
5 Muslim Pieties Across Cultures  
6 Sufism Across Cultures  
7

Fiction and Film in Muslim Communities

 
8 Art and Music in Muslim Communities  
9 Orientalism  
10 Islamophobia  
11 Gender and sexuality in Muslim communities  
12 Islamic feminism (Take-home exam distributed)  
13 Tying up the Loose Ends of the Anthropology of Islam  

 

Policies and Procedures

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central (https://staff.mq.edu.au/work/strategy-planning-and-governance/university-policies-and-procedures/policy-central). Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Undergraduate students seeking more policy resources can visit the Student Policy Gateway (https://students.mq.edu.au/support/study/student-policy-gateway). It is your one-stop-shop for the key policies you need to know about throughout your undergraduate student journey.

If you would like to see all the policies relevant to Learning and Teaching visit Policy Central (https://staff.mq.edu.au/work/strategy-planning-and-governance/university-policies-and-procedures/policy-central).

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/study/getting-started/student-conduct​

Results

Results shown in iLearn, or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent. For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au.

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Learning Skills

Learning Skills (mq.edu.au/learningskills) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to improve your marks and take control of your study.

Student Enquiry Service

For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at ask.mq.edu.au

Equity Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

IT Help

For help with University computer systems and technology, visit http://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/information_technology/help/

When using the University's IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use of IT Resources Policy. The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network including students.

Graduate Capabilities

Critical, Analytical and Integrative Thinking

We want our graduates to be capable of reasoning, questioning and analysing, and to integrate and synthesise learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments; to be able to critique constraints, assumptions and limitations; to be able to think independently and systemically in relation to scholarly activity, in the workplace, and in the world. We want them to have a level of scientific and information technology literacy.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Apply the concerns of various anthropological perspectives and analyses to contemporary debates in and about Islam .
  • Demonstrate knowledge of a number of significant historical developments and their continuing relevance for Islamic societies, as well as in understanding the everyday lives of Muslims.
  • Discern and discuss the tensions and correspondences between political Islam, its representation in writing or film, and political processes in the ethnographers’ own society.
  • Organize a verbal presentation in groups, and provide constructive input into the intellectual issues canvassed in the presentations of other groups.

Assessment tasks

  • Essay
  • Take-Home Exam
  • Group Project: Powerpoint Pres
  • Tutorial Participation

Creative and Innovative

Our graduates will also be capable of creative thinking and of creating knowledge. They will be imaginative and open to experience and capable of innovation at work and in the community. We want them to be engaged in applying their critical, creative thinking.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Apply the concerns of various anthropological perspectives and analyses to contemporary debates in and about Islam .
  • Demonstrate knowledge of a number of significant historical developments and their continuing relevance for Islamic societies, as well as in understanding the everyday lives of Muslims.
  • Discern and discuss the tensions and correspondences between political Islam, its representation in writing or film, and political processes in the ethnographers’ own society.
  • Organize a verbal presentation in groups, and provide constructive input into the intellectual issues canvassed in the presentations of other groups.

Assessment tasks

  • Essay
  • Take-Home Exam
  • Group Project: Powerpoint Pres
  • Tutorial Participation

Discipline Specific Knowledge and Skills

Our graduates will take with them the intellectual development, depth and breadth of knowledge, scholarly understanding, and specific subject content in their chosen fields to make them competent and confident in their subject or profession. They will be able to demonstrate, where relevant, professional technical competence and meet professional standards. They will be able to articulate the structure of knowledge of their discipline, be able to adapt discipline-specific knowledge to novel situations, and be able to contribute from their discipline to inter-disciplinary solutions to problems.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Apply the concerns of various anthropological perspectives and analyses to contemporary debates in and about Islam .
  • Demonstrate knowledge of a number of significant historical developments and their continuing relevance for Islamic societies, as well as in understanding the everyday lives of Muslims.
  • Discern and discuss the tensions and correspondences between political Islam, its representation in writing or film, and political processes in the ethnographers’ own society.
  • Organize a verbal presentation in groups, and provide constructive input into the intellectual issues canvassed in the presentations of other groups.

Assessment tasks

  • Essay
  • Take-Home Exam
  • Group Project: Powerpoint Pres
  • Tutorial Participation

Problem Solving and Research Capability

Our graduates should be capable of researching; of analysing, and interpreting and assessing data and information in various forms; of drawing connections across fields of knowledge; and they should be able to relate their knowledge to complex situations at work or in the world, in order to diagnose and solve problems. We want them to have the confidence to take the initiative in doing so, within an awareness of their own limitations.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Apply the concerns of various anthropological perspectives and analyses to contemporary debates in and about Islam .
  • Demonstrate knowledge of a number of significant historical developments and their continuing relevance for Islamic societies, as well as in understanding the everyday lives of Muslims.

Assessment tasks

  • Essay
  • Take-Home Exam
  • Group Project: Powerpoint Pres
  • Tutorial Participation

Effective Communication

We want to develop in our students the ability to communicate and convey their views in forms effective with different audiences. We want our graduates to take with them the capability to read, listen, question, gather and evaluate information resources in a variety of formats, assess, write clearly, speak effectively, and to use visual communication and communication technologies as appropriate.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Apply the concerns of various anthropological perspectives and analyses to contemporary debates in and about Islam .
  • Organize a verbal presentation in groups, and provide constructive input into the intellectual issues canvassed in the presentations of other groups.

Assessment tasks

  • Essay
  • Take-Home Exam
  • Group Project: Powerpoint Pres
  • Tutorial Participation

Engaged and Ethical Local and Global citizens

As local citizens our graduates will be aware of indigenous perspectives and of the nation's historical context. They will be engaged with the challenges of contemporary society and with knowledge and ideas. We want our graduates to have respect for diversity, to be open-minded, sensitive to others and inclusive, and to be open to other cultures and perspectives: they should have a level of cultural literacy. Our graduates should be aware of disadvantage and social justice, and be willing to participate to help create a wiser and better society.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Demonstrate knowledge of a number of significant historical developments and their continuing relevance for Islamic societies, as well as in understanding the everyday lives of Muslims.
  • Discern and discuss the tensions and correspondences between political Islam, its representation in writing or film, and political processes in the ethnographers’ own society.

Assessment tasks

  • Essay
  • Take-Home Exam

Commitment to Continuous Learning

Our graduates will have enquiring minds and a literate curiosity which will lead them to pursue knowledge for its own sake. They will continue to pursue learning in their careers and as they participate in the world. They will be capable of reflecting on their experiences and relationships with others and the environment, learning from them, and growing - personally, professionally and socially.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • Organize a verbal presentation in groups, and provide constructive input into the intellectual issues canvassed in the presentations of other groups.

Assessment tasks

  • Group Project: Powerpoint Pres
  • Tutorial Participation

Changes since First Published

Date Description
11/07/2018 change of course convenor and schedule of subjects
29/06/2018 change in email address