Logo Students

ANTH700 – Applied Anthropology: Why Does Culture Matter?

2018 – S1 Evening

General Information

Pdf icon Download as PDF
Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff Convenor
Gabriele Marranci
Contact via via email
Hearing Hub
TBA
Credit points Credit points
4
Prerequisites Prerequisites
Admission to MRes
Corequisites Corequisites
Co-badged status Co-badged status
Co-badged with ANTH800
Unit description Unit description
This unit examines the uses of culture in professional settings at various levels, from the management of urban communities and interpersonal conflicts to the international strategies of corporations and governments. The objective of this unit is to train students for situations in a variety of contexts in which decisions have to be made based on contested cultural claims.

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at https://students.mq.edu.au/important-dates

Learning Outcomes

  1. Students are capable of discussing the role of culture, both from a theoretical perspective and from a practitioners point of view. They can explore and critique the literature and professional practices about relevant theories.
  2. Students are capable of discussing, debating and evaluating various theories of anthropology concerning cultural issues. They can explain and critically assess the extent to which culture matters in different realities.
  3. The students will be able to employ applied anthropology methods in oral and written form and present the results of research and work carried out in a detailed and appropriately structured report. They also demonstrate effective oral, written and visual communication skills that are appropriate to the purpose, medium and audience.
  4. Students are aware of ethical issues in professional contexts. They will be engaged with the challenges of contemporary society. They should have a high level of cultural literacy.
  5. Students have emotional intelligence and sound interpersonal skills and demonstrate discernment and common sense in their professional and personal judgement. They will exercise initiative as needed. They can design, implement, manage, monitor and evaluate projects in real-world contexts. They are capable of risk assessment and capable of handling ambiguity and complexity, enabling them to be adaptable in diverse and changing environments.

General Assessment Information

Late Submission Faculty Policy 

 

Unless a Special Consideration request has been submitted and approved, (a) a penalty for lateness will be applied - two (2) marks out of 100 will be deduced per day for assignments after the due date and (b) no assignment will be accepted more than seven (7) days (incl. weekends) after the original submission deadline. No late submission will be accepted for timed assessments-- eg. quizzes, online tests.

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Hurdle Due
Seminar Participation 30% Yes Weekly
In Class iLearn Quiz 30% No Week 12
Final Essay 40% Yes Friday Week 13

Seminar Participation

Due: Weekly
Weighting: 30%
This is a hurdle assessment task (see assessment policy for more information on hurdle assessment tasks)

NOTICE: This is a hurdle assessment

Attendance at seminars is compulsory. No student will pass the course if they are missing more than one seminar without an approved Special Consideration.

It is ESSENTIAL that students familiarise themselves with the Special Consideration process.

Students, when required, must take part in Kialo.com platform discussions. 

At the end of each seminar, students will be asked to write a short (400-500 word) reflection on the seminar material, including their participation in the seminar. They will also have an opportunity to highlight any difficulties they may have encountered during the seminar or the literature. Students are required to hand this in at the following weekly seminar (worth 15 of the marks out of 30).  


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Students are capable of discussing the role of culture, both from a theoretical perspective and from a practitioners point of view. They can explore and critique the literature and professional practices about relevant theories.
  • Students are capable of discussing, debating and evaluating various theories of anthropology concerning cultural issues. They can explain and critically assess the extent to which culture matters in different realities.
  • The students will be able to employ applied anthropology methods in oral and written form and present the results of research and work carried out in a detailed and appropriately structured report. They also demonstrate effective oral, written and visual communication skills that are appropriate to the purpose, medium and audience.
  • Students are aware of ethical issues in professional contexts. They will be engaged with the challenges of contemporary society. They should have a high level of cultural literacy.
  • Students have emotional intelligence and sound interpersonal skills and demonstrate discernment and common sense in their professional and personal judgement. They will exercise initiative as needed. They can design, implement, manage, monitor and evaluate projects in real-world contexts. They are capable of risk assessment and capable of handling ambiguity and complexity, enabling them to be adaptable in diverse and changing environments.

In Class iLearn Quiz

Due: Week 12
Weighting: 30%

This will be a closed book iLearn Quiz, taken in class, drawing from both readings and lectures. Information and instructions are available on iLearn in the Assessment Section. 

Students are required to attend their lecture in Week 12 and bring with them their laptops or iPads (NOTE: no phones will be allowed). They will find a link on iLearn to take the quiz which will test their knowledge of the readings and material of the course. 

This closed book quiz will have 30 multiple choice questions including true and false questions to be completed in class within 45 minutes. 

Note: According to the new Faculty Submission Penalty policy, no late submission will be accepted for timed assessments (like point quizzes). Quizzes will not be repeated under any circumstances, other than with approved Special Consideration.  


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Students are capable of discussing, debating and evaluating various theories of anthropology concerning cultural issues. They can explain and critically assess the extent to which culture matters in different realities.
  • Students are aware of ethical issues in professional contexts. They will be engaged with the challenges of contemporary society. They should have a high level of cultural literacy.
  • Students have emotional intelligence and sound interpersonal skills and demonstrate discernment and common sense in their professional and personal judgement. They will exercise initiative as needed. They can design, implement, manage, monitor and evaluate projects in real-world contexts. They are capable of risk assessment and capable of handling ambiguity and complexity, enabling them to be adaptable in diverse and changing environments.

Final Essay

Due: Friday Week 13
Weighting: 40%
This is a hurdle assessment task (see assessment policy for more information on hurdle assessment tasks)

Final Essay

NOTICE: This is a hurdle assessment. You must submit the essay to pass the course!

The final essay consists of 2500 words critical analysis and discussion of one of the course "Parts" and its readings. The student should engage critically with the material of the selected "Part" of the course and show that they can contribute to the discussion by choosing appropriate academic literature on the topic. 

The essay should be submitted via Turnitin. Further information about style and format as well as examples of previous works and suggestions to help you to write the essay will be provided on iLearn in due course. 

IMPORTANT:  You must submit your essay on time according to the Faculty of Arts submission policy to be allowed to pass the course.

Since this is a postgraduate course, plagiarism will not be tolerated or excused, and it will be dealt with according to the University Policy.

Faculty Policy on Late Submission Penalty 

(Note that I cannot do anything about this: it is strictly enforced, so insisting for more time, or requests for no-penalities will not change the outcome!) 

"Unless a Special Consideration request has been submitted and approved, (a) a penalty for lateness will be applied - two (2) marks out of 100 will be deduced per day for assignments after the due date and (b) no assignment will be accepted more than seven (7) days (incl. weekends) after the original submission deadline. No late submission will be accepted for timed assessments-- e.g. quizzes, online tests." 


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Students are capable of discussing the role of culture, both from a theoretical perspective and from a practitioners point of view. They can explore and critique the literature and professional practices about relevant theories.
  • Students are capable of discussing, debating and evaluating various theories of anthropology concerning cultural issues. They can explain and critically assess the extent to which culture matters in different realities.
  • The students will be able to employ applied anthropology methods in oral and written form and present the results of research and work carried out in a detailed and appropriately structured report. They also demonstrate effective oral, written and visual communication skills that are appropriate to the purpose, medium and audience.
  • Students are aware of ethical issues in professional contexts. They will be engaged with the challenges of contemporary society. They should have a high level of cultural literacy.
  • Students have emotional intelligence and sound interpersonal skills and demonstrate discernment and common sense in their professional and personal judgement. They will exercise initiative as needed. They can design, implement, manage, monitor and evaluate projects in real-world contexts. They are capable of risk assessment and capable of handling ambiguity and complexity, enabling them to be adaptable in diverse and changing environments.

Delivery and Resources

Further information and material will be available through iLearn 

Unit Schedule

 

S1: Introduction to the Course and Main Concepts

 

 

PART 1: Culturalist Approach to Culture and Its Critics

 

S2    a) The Concept of Culture in  Anthropology

           Readings: 

  • Muller, Adam, ed.Concepts of culture: Art, politics, and society. University of Calgary Press, 2005. Introduction 
  • Ingold, Tim. "Introduction to culture."Companion encyclopedia of anthropology: Humanity, culture, and social life(1994): 329-349.

S3  b) Geertz and Interpretative Anthropology

         Readings: 

  •       Geertz, Clifford. "Thick description: Toward an interpretive theory of culture."Turning points in qualitative research: Tying knots in a handkerchief3 (1973): 143-168.Har  vard

S4   c)  Criticism of  the Cultural Approach

            Readings: 

  • Brown, Penelope: Anthropology beyond culture. Berg, 2002. Introduction 

 

 

PART 2: Evolutionary and Neuro-Anthropological Approaches

 

S5     a) The Encultured Brain

      Readings 

  • Downey, G., & Lende, D. H. (2012). Neuroanthropology and the encultured brain.The encultured brain: an introduction to neuroanthropology, 23-65. Chapter 2
  • Dressler, William W., Mauro C. Balieiro, and José Ernesto dos Santos. "14 Cultural Consonance, Consciousness, and Depression: Genetic Moderating Effects on the Psychological Mediators of Culture."The Encultured Brain: An Introduction to Neuroanthropology(2012): 363.

  S6     b) Theory of Cultural Evolution and its Critics

               Readings

  • Smith, Eric Alden. "Agency and adaptation: new directions in evolutionary anthropology."Annual Review of Anthropology42 (2013): 103-120.
  • Ingold, Tim. "Beyond biology and culture. The meaning of evolution in a relational world."Social anthropology12, no. 2 (2004): 209-221.Harvard

  S7     c) Culture Evolution and Religion

              Readings

  • Boyer, Pascal. "Cognitive predispositions and cultural transmission."P. Boyer, & J. Wertsch, Memory in Mind and Culture(2009): 288-319. Chapter 13
  • Boyer, Pascal, and Brian Bergstrom. "Evolutionary perspectives on religion."Annual review of anthropology37 (2008): 111-130.

 

 

PART 3:   Issues in Cultural Contacts

 

 S8     a) Cultural Relativism and Its Critics

                Readings

  • Geertz, Distinguished Lecture. "Anti Anti-Relativism, Anthro263 (1984): 264
  • Spiro, Melford E. "Cultural relativism and the future of anthropology."Cultural Anthropology1, no. 3 (1986): 259-286.
  • Zechenter, Elizabeth M. "In the name of culture: Cultural relativism and the abuse of the individual."Journal of Anthropological Research53, no. 3 (1997): 319-347.

 S9      b) Cultural Appropriation?

             Readings

  • Cultural Appropriation, Cultural Exploitation, Cultural Genocide: Problems of Neoliberal Diversity Management.By Maximilian C. Forte From Zero Anthropology, 19 December 2017.
  • Rodriquez, Jason. "Color-blind ideology and the cultural appropriation of hip-hop."Journal of Contemporary Ethnography35, no. 6 (2006): 645-668

 

 

PART 4: Applied Anthropology: The case of Anthro-Criminology

 

S10   a) Anthropologists, Culture and Crime

               Readings

  • Rhodes, Lorna A. "Toward an anthropology of prisons."Annual Review of Anthropology30, no. 1 (2001): 65-83.
  • Schneider, Jane, and Peter Schneider. "The anthropology of crime and criminalization."Annual review of anthropology37 (2008): 351-373.

S11    b) Fieldwork and Crime

         Readings

  • Starr, June. "The Anthropologist Accused." InCrime’s Power, pp. 77-97. Palgrave Macmillan, New York, 2003.
  • Marranci, Gabriele.Faith, ideology and fear: Muslims identities within and beyond prisons. A&C Black, 2011. Chapter 4

S12  Conclusions and Revisions 

S13: In-class quiz 

 

Policies and Procedures

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central (https://staff.mq.edu.au/work/strategy-planning-and-governance/university-policies-and-procedures/policy-central). Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Undergraduate students seeking more policy resources can visit the Student Policy Gateway (https://students.mq.edu.au/support/study/student-policy-gateway). It is your one-stop-shop for the key policies you need to know about throughout your undergraduate student journey.

If you would like to see all the policies relevant to Learning and Teaching visit Policy Central (https://staff.mq.edu.au/work/strategy-planning-and-governance/university-policies-and-procedures/policy-central).

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/study/getting-started/student-conduct​

Results

Results shown in iLearn, or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent. For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au.

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Learning Skills

Learning Skills (mq.edu.au/learningskills) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to improve your marks and take control of your study.

Student Enquiry Service

For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at ask.mq.edu.au

Equity Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

IT Help

For help with University computer systems and technology, visit http://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/information_technology/help/

When using the University's IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use of IT Resources Policy. The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network including students.

Graduate Capabilities

PG - Critical, Analytical and Integrative Thinking

Our postgraduates will be capable of utilising and reflecting on prior knowledge and experience, of applying higher level critical thinking skills, and of integrating and synthesising learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments. A characteristic of this form of thinking is the generation of new, professionally oriented knowledge through personal or group-based critique of practice and theory.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Students are capable of discussing the role of culture, both from a theoretical perspective and from a practitioners point of view. They can explore and critique the literature and professional practices about relevant theories.
  • Students are capable of discussing, debating and evaluating various theories of anthropology concerning cultural issues. They can explain and critically assess the extent to which culture matters in different realities.
  • Students are aware of ethical issues in professional contexts. They will be engaged with the challenges of contemporary society. They should have a high level of cultural literacy.
  • Students have emotional intelligence and sound interpersonal skills and demonstrate discernment and common sense in their professional and personal judgement. They will exercise initiative as needed. They can design, implement, manage, monitor and evaluate projects in real-world contexts. They are capable of risk assessment and capable of handling ambiguity and complexity, enabling them to be adaptable in diverse and changing environments.

Assessment tasks

  • Seminar Participation
  • Final Essay

PG - Effective Communication

Our postgraduates will be able to communicate effectively and convey their views to different social, cultural, and professional audiences. They will be able to use a variety of technologically supported media to communicate with empathy using a range of written, spoken or visual formats.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Students are capable of discussing the role of culture, both from a theoretical perspective and from a practitioners point of view. They can explore and critique the literature and professional practices about relevant theories.
  • Students are capable of discussing, debating and evaluating various theories of anthropology concerning cultural issues. They can explain and critically assess the extent to which culture matters in different realities.
  • The students will be able to employ applied anthropology methods in oral and written form and present the results of research and work carried out in a detailed and appropriately structured report. They also demonstrate effective oral, written and visual communication skills that are appropriate to the purpose, medium and audience.
  • Students are aware of ethical issues in professional contexts. They will be engaged with the challenges of contemporary society. They should have a high level of cultural literacy.

Assessment tasks

  • Seminar Participation
  • Final Essay

PG - Discipline Knowledge and Skills

Our postgraduates will be able to demonstrate a significantly enhanced depth and breadth of knowledge, scholarly understanding, and specific subject content knowledge in their chosen fields.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Students are capable of discussing the role of culture, both from a theoretical perspective and from a practitioners point of view. They can explore and critique the literature and professional practices about relevant theories.
  • Students are capable of discussing, debating and evaluating various theories of anthropology concerning cultural issues. They can explain and critically assess the extent to which culture matters in different realities.
  • Students have emotional intelligence and sound interpersonal skills and demonstrate discernment and common sense in their professional and personal judgement. They will exercise initiative as needed. They can design, implement, manage, monitor and evaluate projects in real-world contexts. They are capable of risk assessment and capable of handling ambiguity and complexity, enabling them to be adaptable in diverse and changing environments.

Assessment tasks

  • Seminar Participation
  • In Class iLearn Quiz
  • Final Essay

PG - Research and Problem Solving Capability

Our postgraduates will be capable of systematic enquiry; able to use research skills to create new knowledge that can be applied to real world issues, or contribute to a field of study or practice to enhance society. They will be capable of creative questioning, problem finding and problem solving.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Students are capable of discussing the role of culture, both from a theoretical perspective and from a practitioners point of view. They can explore and critique the literature and professional practices about relevant theories.
  • Students are capable of discussing, debating and evaluating various theories of anthropology concerning cultural issues. They can explain and critically assess the extent to which culture matters in different realities.

Assessment tasks

  • Seminar Participation
  • Final Essay

PG - Engaged and Responsible, Active and Ethical Citizens

Our postgraduates will be ethically aware and capable of confident transformative action in relation to their professional responsibilities and the wider community. They will have a sense of connectedness with others and country and have a sense of mutual obligation. They will be able to appreciate the impact of their professional roles for social justice and inclusion related to national and global issues

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Students are capable of discussing the role of culture, both from a theoretical perspective and from a practitioners point of view. They can explore and critique the literature and professional practices about relevant theories.
  • Students are capable of discussing, debating and evaluating various theories of anthropology concerning cultural issues. They can explain and critically assess the extent to which culture matters in different realities.
  • Students are aware of ethical issues in professional contexts. They will be engaged with the challenges of contemporary society. They should have a high level of cultural literacy.
  • Students have emotional intelligence and sound interpersonal skills and demonstrate discernment and common sense in their professional and personal judgement. They will exercise initiative as needed. They can design, implement, manage, monitor and evaluate projects in real-world contexts. They are capable of risk assessment and capable of handling ambiguity and complexity, enabling them to be adaptable in diverse and changing environments.

Assessment tasks

  • Seminar Participation
  • In Class iLearn Quiz
  • Final Essay

PG - Capable of Professional and Personal Judgment and Initiative

Our postgraduates will demonstrate a high standard of discernment and common sense in their professional and personal judgment. They will have the ability to make informed choices and decisions that reflect both the nature of their professional work and their personal perspectives.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Students are capable of discussing the role of culture, both from a theoretical perspective and from a practitioners point of view. They can explore and critique the literature and professional practices about relevant theories.
  • Students are capable of discussing, debating and evaluating various theories of anthropology concerning cultural issues. They can explain and critically assess the extent to which culture matters in different realities.
  • Students are aware of ethical issues in professional contexts. They will be engaged with the challenges of contemporary society. They should have a high level of cultural literacy.
  • Students have emotional intelligence and sound interpersonal skills and demonstrate discernment and common sense in their professional and personal judgement. They will exercise initiative as needed. They can design, implement, manage, monitor and evaluate projects in real-world contexts. They are capable of risk assessment and capable of handling ambiguity and complexity, enabling them to be adaptable in diverse and changing environments.

Assessment tasks

  • Seminar Participation
  • In Class iLearn Quiz
  • Final Essay