Logo Students

GEOP3060 – Borderless Worlds

2020 – Session 2, Fully online/virtual

Notice

As part of Phase 3 of our return to campus plan, most units will now run tutorials, seminars and other small group learning activities on campus for the second half-year, while keeping an online version available for those students unable to return or those who choose to continue their studies online.

To check the availability of face to face activities for your unit, please go to timetable viewer. To check detailed information on unit assessments visit your unit's iLearn space or consult your unit convenor.

General Information

Pdf icon Download as PDF
Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff Lecturer
Andrew Burridge
Contact via Email
By appointment only
Credit points Credit points
10
Prerequisites Prerequisites
40cp at 2000 level or above
Corequisites Corequisites
Co-badged status Co-badged status
Unit description Unit description

It is frequently stated that we are living in a borderless and highly globalised world, where humans and capital move freely between nation states. At the same time, there has been a proliferation of border walls erected across the globe, while various other controls of human mobility are seen not only at international boundary lines, but also within our day-to-day lives, including our places of work and education. How then can we make sense of the myriad forms of borders and bordering in a supposedly borderless world? This unit will provide a critical investigation of the role of international borders, their management and policing, disputes over territory, and their impact upon migration in a global context. The unit will draw connections between theoretical approaches and contemporary Australian and international examples. Students will trace the life of borders from their inception to their removal (and often their re-inception), the diverse forms they take, and how they are managed. Students will develop a deeper understanding of contemporary human mobility, the means in which it is controlled across differing scales, and the diverse impacts upon various communities.

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at https://students.mq.edu.au/important-dates

Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of this unit, you will be able to:

  • ULO1: Identify and discuss the significance of a geographical perspective on borders.
  • ULO2: Describe and explain the geopolitical role of international borders and boundaries in a supposedly borderless and globalised world.
  • ULO3: Critically examine how borders are formed, managed, monitored, policed, fortified, contested, breached, and dismantled.
  • ULO4: Recognise the importance of territory to bordering and the ways in which nation states control both territory and mobility.
  • ULO5: Apply geographical concepts to evaluate the impacts of borders and territorial disputes on diverse populations.

General Assessment Information

Late Assessment Penalty

Unless a Special Consideration request has been submitted and approved, (a) a penalty for lateness will apply – two (2) marks out of 100 will be deducted per day for assignments submitted after the due date – and (b) no assignment will be accepted more than seven (7) days (incl. weekends) after the original submission deadline. No late submissions will be accepted for timed assessments – e.g. quizzes, online tests.

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Hurdle Due
Literature review 30% No Week 5 - Tuesday 25th August
Diary of border conflict 30% No Ongoing
Research essay 40% No Week 13 - Friday 6th November

Literature review

Assessment Type 1: Essay
Indicative Time on Task 2: 35 hours
Due: Week 5 - Tuesday 25th August
Weighting: 30%

1000 word literature review assessing the role of borders in a borderless world.


On successful completion you will be able to:
  • Identify and discuss the significance of a geographical perspective on borders.
  • Describe and explain the geopolitical role of international borders and boundaries in a supposedly borderless and globalised world.
  • Recognise the importance of territory to bordering and the ways in which nation states control both territory and mobility.

Diary of border conflict

Assessment Type 1: Participatory task
Indicative Time on Task 2: 20 hours
Due: Ongoing
Weighting: 30%

Throughout the semester, you will be required to keep a diary of a contemporary border conflict or dispute of your choice such as the Kashmir border region, or Australia’s use of maritime interdiction and offshore detention. Each week you should collate professional and media reports on your selected dispute and prepare brief reflective summaries.


On successful completion you will be able to:
  • Describe and explain the geopolitical role of international borders and boundaries in a supposedly borderless and globalised world.
  • Critically examine how borders are formed, managed, monitored, policed, fortified, contested, breached, and dismantled.
  • Recognise the importance of territory to bordering and the ways in which nation states control both territory and mobility.

Research essay

Assessment Type 1: Essay
Indicative Time on Task 2: 35 hours
Due: Week 13 - Friday 6th November
Weighting: 40%

3000 word research essay drawing upon academic and grey literature to critically assess the humanitarian implications of international borders and the methods in which they are controlled.


On successful completion you will be able to:
  • Identify and discuss the significance of a geographical perspective on borders.
  • Describe and explain the geopolitical role of international borders and boundaries in a supposedly borderless and globalised world.
  • Critically examine how borders are formed, managed, monitored, policed, fortified, contested, breached, and dismantled.
  • Recognise the importance of territory to bordering and the ways in which nation states control both territory and mobility.
  • Apply geographical concepts to evaluate the impacts of borders and territorial disputes on diverse populations.

1 If you need help with your assignment, please contact:

  • the academic teaching staff in your unit for guidance in understanding or completing this type of assessment
  • the Learning Skills Unit for academic skills support.

2 Indicative time-on-task is an estimate of the time required for completion of the assessment task and is subject to individual variation

Delivery and Resources

Lectures and Tutorials

Learning and teaching activities comprise a mix of recorded lectures, tutorials and discussion activities. Please see iLearn for further details

Recommended Texts and/or Materials

There is no set textbook for this unit; however, independent reading and tutorial discussions are integral to GEOP3060 and a full reading list will be made available on iLearn, with readings accessible via Leganto. Students are expected to complete the required weekly set readings before each tutorial.

Unit webpage and Technology used and required

All enrolled students have access to the unit website at https://ilearn.mq.edu.au/login/MQ/ . Access to the website is essential to complete GEOP3060.

Unit Schedule

Week

Topic

Part 1: Introduction

Border studies and/in geography

 

1

Geography and borders:

Borders in a borderless world?

2

Colonial borders:

Exploration, boundary making, the modern nation-state and territory

Part 2:

Borders in the contemporary world

 

3

Defence borders:

Securitisation, militarisation and terrorism

4

Liquid borders:

Maritime boundaries, islands, and ice

5

Disease borders:

Pandemics, COVID-19, and biosecurity

6

More-than-human borders:

Climate change, loss of territory and more than human border encounters

7

Non-contiguous borders:

Enclaves, exclaves and extra-territoriality

*Recess

 

8

Australian borders:

Indigenous, state and national borders

9

Crossing borders:

Migration and border deaths

10

Activist borders:

No/open borders, humanitarianism and vigilantism

11

Carceral borders:

The camp, the detention centre and the prison

12

Everyday borders:

Borders in our daily lives

Part 3: Conclusion

 

13

Decolonising borders:

Towards a critical border studies

Policies and Procedures

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central (https://staff.mq.edu.au/work/strategy-planning-and-governance/university-policies-and-procedures/policy-central). Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Students seeking more policy resources can visit the Student Policy Gateway (https://students.mq.edu.au/support/study/student-policy-gateway). It is your one-stop-shop for the key policies you need to know about throughout your undergraduate student journey.

If you would like to see all the policies relevant to Learning and Teaching visit Policy Central (https://staff.mq.edu.au/work/strategy-planning-and-governance/university-policies-and-procedures/policy-central).

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/study/getting-started/student-conduct​

Results

Results published on platform other than eStudent, (eg. iLearn, Coursera etc.) or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent. For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au or if you are a Global MBA student contact globalmba.support@mq.edu.au

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Learning Skills

Learning Skills (mq.edu.au/learningskills) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to help you improve your marks and take control of your study.

The Library provides online and face to face support to help you find and use relevant information resources. 

Student Enquiry Service

For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at ask.mq.edu.au

If you are a Global MBA student contact globalmba.support@mq.edu.au

Equity Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

IT Help

For help with University computer systems and technology, visit http://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/information_technology/help/

When using the University's IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use of IT Resources Policy. The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network including students.

Changes from Previous Offering

N/A - this is a new unit