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ECHE1130 – Play Based Approaches to Early Childhood Learning and Development

2020 – Session 2, Special circumstance

Notice

As part of Phase 3 of our return to campus plan, most units will now run tutorials, seminars and other small group learning activities on campus for the second half-year, while keeping an online version available for those students unable to return or those who choose to continue their studies online.

To check the availability of face to face activities for your unit, please go to timetable viewer. To check detailed information on unit assessments visit your unit's iLearn space or consult your unit convenor.

General Information

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Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff
Yeshe Colliver
Credit points Credit points
10
Prerequisites Prerequisites
Corequisites Corequisites
Co-badged status Co-badged status
Unit description Unit description
This unit is subject to a quota. Limited places are available. Please refer to the Faculty for further information. This unit examines the role of play and inquiry in children's lives, their learning and development. Students develop a theoretical understanding of the characteristics of young children's play and inquiry and explore how environments, resources and teaching techniques can be structured to facilitate children's active and meaningful engagement in the learning process. Students will analyse the developmental and educational potential of children's play and inquiry across a range of contexts and will reflect on how play and inquiry experiences can be used to cater for children with diverse developmental, educational and cultural learning styles.

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at https://students.mq.edu.au/important-dates

Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of this unit, you will be able to:

  • ULO1: Understand the characteristics of young children's play and inquiry across different contexts.
  • ULO2: Identify and apply relevant theoretical knowledge about play and inquiry in order to address the assignment requirements.
  • ULO3: Analyse the features and potentials of young children's play environments and materials.
  • ULO4: Generate ideas about play/inquiry experiences that will enhance children's experiences and learning.
  • ULO5: Format and submit assignments appropriately and on time, as per instructions in the Unit Guide.
  • ULO6: Address assignment requirements using appropriate academic written expression.
  • ULO7: Identify key arguments in academic readings and use these appropriately to support the views expressed in assignments.
  • ULO8: Use in-text citations and construct a reference list using APA 6th style.

General Assessment Information

Assessment Presentation and Submission Guidelines 

Please follow these guidelines when you submit each assignment: 

  • Allow a left and right-hand margin of at least 2cm in all assignments. 

  • Please type all assignments using 12-point font and 1.5 spacing. 

  • All assessments must be submitted through Turnitin in .doc or .pdf format  

  • It is the responsibility of the student to ensure that all assessments are successfully submitted through Turnitin. 

  • Faculty assignment cover sheets are NOT required. 

 

Draft Submissions & Turnitin Originality Reports 

  • Students may use Turnitin’s Originality Report as a learning tool to improve their academic writing if this option is made available in the unit. 

  • Students are strongly encouraged to upload a draft copy of each assessment to Turnitin at least one week prior to the due date to obtain an Originality Report. 

  • The Originality Report provides students with a similarity index that may indicate if plagiarism has occurred. Students will be able to make amendments to their drafts prior to their final submission on the due date. 

  • Generally, one Originality Report is generated every 24 hours up to the due date. 

 

Please note: 

  • Students should regularly save a copy of all assignments before submission, 

  • Students are responsible for checking that their submission has been successful and has been submitted by the due date and time. 

 

Assignment extensions and late penalties 

  • In general, there should be no need for extensions except through illness or misadventure that would be categorised as serious and unavoidable disruption according to the University definition of same, see:  https://students.mq.edu.au/study/my-study-program/special-consideration 

 

  • Applications for extensions must be made via AskMQ according to the Special Consideration policy. Extensions can only be granted if they meet the Special Considerations policy and are submitted via https://ask.mq.edu.au/. This will ensure consistency in the consideration of such requests is maintained.  

 

  • Unless a Special Consideration request has been submitted and approved, (a) a penalty for lateness will apply – two (2) marks out of 100 will be deducted per day for assignments submitted after the due date – and (b) no assignment will be accepted more than seven (7) days (incl. weekends) after the original submission deadline. No late submissions will be accepted for timed assessments – e.g. quizzes, online tests.You are reminded that submitting even 1 day late could be the difference between passing and failing a unit. Late penalties are applied by unit convenors or their delegates after tasks are assessed. 

 

  • No assessable work will be accepted after the return/release of marked work on the same topic. If a student is still permitted to submit on the basis of unavoidable disruption, an alternative topic may be set.  

 

  • Students should keep an electronic file of all assessments. Claims regarding "lost" assessments cannot be made if the file cannot be produced. It is also advisable to keep an electronic file of all drafts and the final submission on a USB untouched/unopened after submission. This can be used to demonstrate easily that the assessment has not been amended after the submission date. 

  • Online quizzes are an individual assessment task and MUST BE COMPLETED by each student individually. Similarities in responses between students will be checked and investigated for possible collusion. Please see the Academic Integrity policy for more information. 

 

Requesting a re-assessment of an assignment 

If you have evidence that your task has been incorrectly assessed against the grade descriptors you can request a re-mark. To request a re-mark you need to contact the unit convenor within 7 days of the date of return of the assignment and provide a detailed assessment of your script against the task criteria. Evidence from your assignment must be provided to support your judgements.  

 

Note: Failed assessments cannot be re-marked as they are all double-marked as a part of the moderation process.  

 

Please note: The outcome of a re-mark may be a higher/lower or unchanged grade. Grades are standards referenced and effort is NOT a criterion.

 

University policy on grading 

Criteria for awarding grades for assessment tasks 

Assignments will be awarded grades ranging from HD to F according to guidelines set out in the University's Grading Policy. The following descriptive criteria are included for your information. 

 

Descriptive Criteria for awarding grades in the unit 

In order to meet the unit outcomes and successfully pass this unit, students must make a genuine attempt at all assessment tasks.  Where this requirement is not met you will be awarded an FA grade with a maximum mark of 45. 

 

Students will be awarded grades ranging from HD to F according to guidelines set out in the assessment policy: https://staff.mq.edu.au/work/strategy-planning-and-governance/university-policies-and-procedures/policies/assessment-in-effect-from-session-2-2016 

 

In order to ensure clear distinctions between grades, final marks of 49, 64, 74 and 84 will not be used. The following generic grade descriptors provide university-wide standards for awarding final grades. 

 

Grade 

Descriptor 

HD 

(High Distinction) 

Provides consistent evidence of deep and critical understanding in relation to the learning outcomes. There is substantial originality and insight in identifying, generating and communicating competing arguments, perspectives or problem solving approaches; critical evaluation of problems, their solutions and their implications; creativity in application as appropriate to the discipline. 

(Distinction) 

Provides evidence of integration and evaluation of critical ideas, principles and theories, distinctive insight and ability in applying relevant skills and concepts in relation to learning outcomes. There is demonstration of frequent originality in defining and analysing issues or problems and providing solutions; and the use of means of communication appropriate to the discipline and the audience. 

Cr 

(Credit) 

Provides evidence of learning that goes beyond replication of content knowledge or skills relevant to the learning outcomes. There is demonstration of substantial understanding of fundamental concepts in the field of study and the ability to apply these concepts in a variety of contexts; convincing argumentation with appropriate coherent justification; communication of ideas fluently and clearly in terms of the conventions of the discipline. 

(Pass) 

Provides sufficient evidence of the achievement of learning outcomes. There is demonstration of understanding and application of fundamental concepts of the field of study; routine argumentation with acceptable justification; communication of information and ideas adequately in terms of the conventions of the discipline. The learning attainment is considered satisfactory or adequate or competent or capable in relation to the specified outcomes 

(Fail) 

Does not provide evidence of attainment of learning outcomes. There is missing or partial or superficial or faulty understanding and application of the fundamental concepts in the field of study; missing, undeveloped, inappropriate or confusing argumentation; incomplete, confusing or lacking communication of ideas in ways that give little attention to the conventions of the discipline. 

Note: If you fail a unit with a professional experience component the fail grade will be on your transcript irrespective of the timing of the placement. 

 

Withdrawing from this UG Unit 

If you are considering withdrawing from this unit, please seek academic advice via https://ask.mq.edu.au before doing so as this unit may be a co-requisite or prerequisite for units in the following sessions and may impact on your progression through the degree. 

 

Results 

Results shown in iLearn, or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent. For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au

 

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Hurdle Due
Reading analysis 20% No 16/08/2020
Play Environment Analysis 30% No 20/09/2020
Module 3 online quizzes 15% No end of weeks 9, 10, 11, and 12
Analysis of play scenario 35% No 08/11/2020

Reading analysis

Assessment Type 1: Literature review
Indicative Time on Task 2: 12 hours
Due: 16/08/2020
Weighting: 20%

Students are required to compare and contrast a specified written work on play with their set readings


On successful completion you will be able to:
  • Understand the characteristics of young children's play and inquiry across different contexts.
  • Identify and apply relevant theoretical knowledge about play and inquiry in order to address the assignment requirements.
  • Format and submit assignments appropriately and on time, as per instructions in the Unit Guide.
  • Address assignment requirements using appropriate academic written expression.
  • Identify key arguments in academic readings and use these appropriately to support the views expressed in assignments.
  • Use in-text citations and construct a reference list using APA 6th style.

Play Environment Analysis

Assessment Type 1: Design Task
Indicative Time on Task 2: 18 hours
Due: 20/09/2020
Weighting: 30%

This Assessment Task requires students to provide an analysis of a play setting according to set environmental principles from the readings.


On successful completion you will be able to:
  • Identify and apply relevant theoretical knowledge about play and inquiry in order to address the assignment requirements.
  • Analyse the features and potentials of young children's play environments and materials.
  • Format and submit assignments appropriately and on time, as per instructions in the Unit Guide.
  • Address assignment requirements using appropriate academic written expression.
  • Identify key arguments in academic readings and use these appropriately to support the views expressed in assignments.
  • Use in-text citations and construct a reference list using APA 6th style.

Module 3 online quizzes

Assessment Type 1: Quiz/Test
Indicative Time on Task 2: 9 hours
Due: end of weeks 9, 10, 11, and 12
Weighting: 15%

This Assessment Task requires students to answer questions relating to lecture content from weeks 8-12.


On successful completion you will be able to:
  • Identify and apply relevant theoretical knowledge about play and inquiry in order to address the assignment requirements.
  • Analyse the features and potentials of young children's play environments and materials.
  • Format and submit assignments appropriately and on time, as per instructions in the Unit Guide.

Analysis of play scenario

Assessment Type 1: Case study/analysis
Indicative Time on Task 2: 21 hours
Due: 08/11/2020
Weighting: 35%

This Assessment Task requires an analysis of a play/inquiry scenario using all readings, with an emphasis on Module 3 content.


On successful completion you will be able to:
  • Identify and apply relevant theoretical knowledge about play and inquiry in order to address the assignment requirements.
  • Analyse the features and potentials of young children's play environments and materials.
  • Generate ideas about play/inquiry experiences that will enhance children's experiences and learning.
  • Format and submit assignments appropriately and on time, as per instructions in the Unit Guide.
  • Address assignment requirements using appropriate academic written expression.
  • Identify key arguments in academic readings and use these appropriately to support the views expressed in assignments.
  • Use in-text citations and construct a reference list using APA 6th style.

1 If you need help with your assignment, please contact:

  • the academic teaching staff in your unit for guidance in understanding or completing this type of assessment
  • the Learning Skills Unit for academic skills support.

2 Indicative time-on-task is an estimate of the time required for completion of the assessment task and is subject to individual variation

Delivery and Resources

Unit structure

Students must access and take study notes from the one-hour lecture, which is available on ECHO360 on the Monday of each week. Students must attend their 90-minute tutorial with these notes as well as notes from their required readings of that week as minimal preparation. Most weeks involve tutorial activities that assist you with your assignment writing based on the readings of that week, so even a quick read of all the required readings is required

 

Attendance Requirements 

Attendance at all tutorials is expected.  Attendance at on campus days for external students is also expected. There will be a supporting website for the unit providing additional readings, links and materials. Lectures will also be available through ECHO360 in iLearn from the following website link: http://ilearn.mq.edu.au  

 

Managing your time

Macquarie University semesters are spread over 15 weeks, which includes a 2-week non- teaching time between weeks 6 and 7. For a 3 credit-point unit, such as ECHE1130, you are expected to allocate approximately 9 hours of study per week.

In the case of ECHE1130, this study amount would equate to approximately 135 hours over the 15 week period. As a rough guide, this time would be broken down to:

Activity

 

S2

weekly

 

Weekly lectures (1 hour online)

 

12

1 hr

 

Weekly tutorials (internal students)

 

18

1.5 hr

 

Required readings (completed before relevant lecture)

 

24

2 hrs

 

Preparation and completion, assignment 1

 

12

 

 

Preparation and completion, assignment 2

 

18

 

 

Preparation and completion, assignment 3

 

9

 

 

Preparation and completion, assignment 4

 

21

 

 

Miscellaneous: consultation, reading unit outline, engagement with iLearn site, academic literacy support etc.

 

20

100min

 

TOTAL

 

135

 

 

 

 

The above guide is an estimation only, and you can expect to vary in the amount of time that you spend per week on this unit. Also, some weeks will also be more intensive than others. You will notice the time allocated for assignment preparation. This time will allow you to read and work on your assignments progressively, rather than leaving everything to the last minute. To be successful in this unit, you should keep this time commitment in mind and organise your study program accordingly.

 

Required text and readings There is one required text which is available from the library (with a limit of 6 users at a time, so you will need to log in, download and save each chapter) or Co-op Bookshop on campus. Colliver, Y. (2019). Play and inquiry in early childhood (4th ed.). Sydney, Australia: Pearson.

[Please note that there are significant changes in this edition from previous editions (e.g., the 2013 3rd edition) , so it will be important to obtain the 4th edition (physical copies on reserve at the library, or 24 eBook pages can be printed each day, or on sale in the Book Coop) It is also required that students have access to a copy of a style guide in order to reference correctly for assignments. We recommend: Perrin, R. (2017). Pocket guide to APA style (6th ed). Boston, MA: Cengage Learning.

Other required and additional readings You will need to access supplementary readings for your tutorial and assignment preparation: The Required Readings are ones that you require for your tutorial and assignment preparation. These are found in an appropriately labeled folder in Leganto. Additional resources are not required for tutorial preparation, but can be used for assignments and to help you to develop a deeper understanding of the topic. These are listed as either stimulus readings or E-reserve readings on Leganto and iLearn. Stimulus readings are available in an appropriately labelled folder in the Weekly readings section of each week's dropdown tab. E- reserve readings can be found via the Macquarie University library website. These chapters plus other useful books can be found by typing ‘ECHE1130’ to the Multisearch function on the library homepage and then using the chapter title or author name to locate them. Please familiarise yourself with this facility as it contains some essential readings.

Access and technical assistance

Information for students about access to the online component of this unit is available at ilearn.m q.edu.au/login/MQ/. You will need to enter your student username and password.

Please do NOT contact the Unit Convenor regarding iLearn technical help. No extensions will be given for any technical issues. Allow enough time for your submissions.

 

Assistance is available from IT Helpdesk ph: 1800 67 4357, or log a request at help.mq.edu.au. OneHelp is the online IT support service for both students and staff. This unit requires students to use several ICT and software skills: • Internet access: The iLearn site contains materials for this unit; it is also required for the online submission of all Assessment Tasks, and for the use of Turnitin submission for ALL tasks. • Word processing, visual representations, and document formatting: You are required to use an appropriate form of software to present your assignments. • Uploading of assessment tasks to iLearn.

Unit website There is a website for this unit. Access to this unit is available online through iLearn, at ilearn.m q.edu.au. You will need to login using your Macquarie ID. This site is an essential unit resource. You are required to check this website at least twice per week for any announcements. In addition, it has the following features and functions:

  1. Links to required readings and assignment resources (preferably Leganto)
  2. Assignment submission links: For you to submit your assignment work (DO NOT submit via the Turnitin website, use the link provided on iLearn)
  3. Discussion forums: For you to ask any questions that pertain to other students as well as yourself. You are expected to answer other students' queries every week using this function as it consolidates your own learning and puts you in contact with other students.

  4. Dialogue: will not be used. Email is for questions relating to yourself only. Note that questions of a general nature will not be answered. Only questions not already answered in the Unit Guide or on Discussion forums will be answered, during business hours, within 48 hours. Students need to be aware of this as assignments are generally submitted on weekends, which are not in business hours. 

  5. ECHO360: Weekly lectures are available on the web through the ECHO360 lecture component. You must listen to the lecture for each week.

Please note: • All queries that relate to other students as well as yourself should be posted on the discussion board. It is a great place to consolidate your own understanding by responding to other students' ideas and queries. It is expected that questions posted here will be answered by other students, not staff. • For queries relating only to your own circumstances, and not related to information already in the unit guide or discussion board, please email the unit convenor. Emailing is not a substitute for reading the unit outline and associated expectations, guidelines or information. It is not a personal ‘help-line’, and emails relating to information available on discussion boards or in the unit guide will not be responded to. Unit staff will respond to emails relating to individual circumstances only, and within a timely manner. Please be aware that we have multiple teaching and researching commitments, so may take a couple of days to respond. It is unrealistic to expect us to respond after work hours or during weekends. • Finally, please follow accepted modes of communication that are appropriate for an academic website. E.g., Please  use standard English in your posts and emails (don’t ‘SMS/text type’), and please consider the tone of any email or posting – respectful communications are expected, and disrespectful ones will be reported. 

 

Support resources 

Macquarie University has a range of services for students. If you are struggling with any aspect of academic life or career trajectory and skills, we have great supports within the university. Please refer to the comprehensive list of support services here.  

 

Access and technical assistance  

Information for students about access to the online component of this unit is available at ilearn.mq.edu.au/login/MQ/. You will need to enter your student username and password. 

Please do NOT contact the Unit Convenor regarding iLearn technical help.  

No extensions will be given for any technical issues. Allow enough time for your submissions.  

Assistance is available from IT Helpdesk ph: 1800 67 4357, or log a request at help.mq.edu.au. OneHelp is the online IT support service for both students and staff. 

This unit requires students to use several ICT and software skills: 

  • Internet access: The iLearn site contains materials for this unit; it is also required for the online submission of all Assessment Tasks, and for the use of Turnitin submission for ALL tasks.   

  • Word processing, visual representations, and document formatting: You are required to use an appropriate form of software to present your assignments.  

  • Uploading of assessment tasks to iLearn. 

Unit Schedule

Tutorial and assignment preparation

MODULE 1: UNDERSTANDING PLAY AND INQUIRY

Week 1: Monday 27th July.                  Lecture: “Perspectives on play”

Two required readings, to be completed before the lecture:

From textbook: Feeney, S., Moravcik, E., & Nolte, S. (2019). Understanding and Supporting Play. In Y. Colliver (Ed.), Play and inquiry in early childhood (4th ed., pp. 2–34). Sydney, Australia: Pearson.

From textbook: Van Hoorn, Judith, Monighan Nourot, Patricia, Scales, B., & Alward, K. (2019a). Looking at play through teachers’ eyes. In Y. Colliver (Ed.), Play and inquiry in early childhood (4th ed., pp. 35–65). Sydney, Australia: Pearson. [Read only: pp. 36-51, “Learning outcomes” to “Family Diversity”, and pp. 57-60, “The critical role of the teacher” to “becoming an informed advocate for play”]

 

Two stimulus readings:

Stimulus chapter: Gray, P. (2018) Evolutionary functions of play practice, resilience, innovation, and cooperation. In P. Smith & J. Roopnarine (Eds.), The Cambridge Handbook of Play: Developmental and Disciplinary Perspectives (Cambridge Handbooks in Psychology, pp. 84-102). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. doi:10.1017/9781108131384.006.

 

Stimulus article: Howe, S. (2016). What play means to us: Exploring children’s perspectives on play in an English Year 1 classroom. European Early Childhood Education Research Journal, 24(5), 748-759. doi:10.1080/1350293X.2016.1213567

 

 

Week 2: Monday 3rd August.               Lecture: “Inquiry-based learning”

Two required readings:

From textbook: New, R. S, & Kantor, R. (2019). Reggio Emilia in the 21st Century: Enduring Commitments Amid New Challenges. In Y. Colliver (Ed.), Play and inquiry in early childhood (4th ed., pp. 67–91). Sydney, Australia: Pearson. [Read only: pp. 68–78, i.e., from “Italian Care and education” to “New changes & challenges  in Reggio Emilia”]

From e-book: Van Hoorn, J., Monighan Nourot, P., Scales, B., & Alward, K. (2015). Play and development: Theory. In J. Van Hoorn, P. Monighan Nourot, B. Scales, & K. Alward (Eds.), Play at the center of the curriculum (pp. 32-56). Upper Saddle Creek, NJ: Pearson.

 

Two stimulus readings:

Stimulus article: Touhill, L. (2012). Inquiry-based learning. National Quality Standard Professional Learning Program e-Newsletter, 45, 1-4. Retrieved from http://www.earlychildhoodaustralia.org.au/

Stimulus article: Youngguist, J., Pataray‐Ching, J. (2004). Revisiting "play": Analyzing and articulating acts of inquiry. Early Childhood Education Journal, 31(3), 171‐178.

 

Week 3: Monday 10th August:             Lecture: “Games versus play”

Two Required readings:

From e-book: Winther-Lindqvist, D. (2018). Playing games with rules in early child care and beyond. In P. Smith & J. Roopnarine (Eds.), The Cambridge Handbook of Play: Developmental and Disciplinary Perspectives (Cambridge Handbooks in Psychology, pp. 222-239). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. doi:10.1017/9781108131384.013. Available from: https://www.cambridge.org/core/books/cambridge-handbook-of-play/playing-games-with-rules-in-early-child-care-and-beyond/56C46C15873FCB99E92B8035F39A70FF

Resource reading: Schwartz, L., & Robertson, J. (2012). Materials matter: A conversation on matters material In A. Fleet, C. Patterson, & J. Robertson (Eds.), Conversations: Behind early childhood pedagogical documentation (pp. 169-187). Mt Victoria, Australia: Pademelon Press. [Read only: pp. 178-185]

 

One stimulus reading:

1. E-Reserve chapter (find via MQ Multisearch): Johnson, J. E., Christie, J. F., & Wardle, F. (2005). Educational play. In J. E. Johnson, J. F. Christie, & F. Wardle (Eds.), Play, development, and early education (pp. 196 - 225). Boston, MA: Pearson. [Read only: pp. 207-224]

 

Assignment 1 due 11:59pm Sunday 16th August

 

MODULE 2: CONTEXTS OF PLAY AND INQUIRY

 

Week 4: Monday 17th August             Lecture: “Materials and resources for play and inquiry”

Three required readings:

From e-book: Curtis, D. & Carter, M. (2008). Enhance the curriculum with materials. In D. Curtis & M. Carter, Learning together with young children: A curriculum framework for reflective teachers (Chapter 3, pp. 54-85). St Paul, MN: Redleaf.

Resource reading: Dutton, D. (2014). A Darwinian theory of beauty. Philosophy and Literature, 38(1A), 314-318. doi:10.1353/phl.2014.0045

Resource reading: Touhill, L. (2011). Landscapes for learning. Rattler, 97, 20-23. Retrieved from http://ccccnsw.org.au

 

 

One stimulus reading:

From e-book: Curtis, D. & Carter, M. (2014). Provoke wonder, curiosity, and intellectual challenge. In D. Curtis & M. Carter (eds.). Designs for living and learning: Transforming early childhood environments (Chapter 6, pp. 152- 187).  St Paul, MN: Redleaf. Available from: https://ebookcentral-proquest-com.simsrad.net.ocs.mq.edu.au/lib/mqu/reader.action?docID=4548453&ppg=166

 

 

Week 5: Monday 24th August               Lecture: “Playing outside”

Two required readings:

From textbook: Perry, J. P. (2019). Outdoor play. In Y. Colliver (Ed.), Play and inquiry in early childhood (4th ed., pp. 92–126). Sydney, Australia: Pearson.

From textbook: Frost, J. L., Wortham, S., & Reifel, S. (2019a). Child safety in public places: Indoors and outdoors. In Y. Colliver (Ed.), Play and inquiry in early childhood (4th ed., pp. 127–159). Sydney, Australia: Pearson.

 

Two stimulus readings:

Resource reading: Young, T., & Elliot, S. (2013a). Rethinking outdoor learning environments: Part A: Provocations. National Quality Standard (NQS) Professional Learning Program (PLP) e-¬‐newsletter, 59, 1‐4. Retrieved from: http://www.earlychildhoodaustralia.org.au/nqsplp/wp-content/uploads/2013/07/NQS_PLP_E-Newsletter_No59.pdf

Resource reading: Young, T., & Elliot, S. (2013b). Rethinking outdoor learning environments: Part B: Provisions. National Quality Standard (NQS) Professional Learning Program (PLP) e-¬‐newsletter, 60, 1‐5. Retrieved from: http://www.earlychildhoodaustralia.org.au/nqsplp/wp-content/uploads/2013/08/NQS_PLP_E-Newsletter_No60.pdf

 

 

 

Week 6: Monday 31st August                 Lecture: “Play in diverse contexts”

Two required readings:

From textbook: MacNaughton, G. & Williams, G. (2019a). Decolonising. In Y. Colliver (Ed.), Play and inquiry in early childhood (4th ed., pp. 190–203). Sydney, Australia: Pearson.

From textbook: Frost, J. L., Wortham, S., & Reifel, S. (2019b). Culture and gender in play. In Y. Colliver (Ed.), Play and inquiry in early childhood (4th ed., pp. 204–234). Sydney, Australia: Pearson. [Read only: pp. 204-215, Chapter start to Table 7.1, then pp. 223-228, “Gender and play” to “Summary”]

 

Three stimulus readings:

Resource reading: Lancy, D. F. (2007). Accounting for variability in mother–child play. American Anthropologist, 109(2), 273–284. doi:10.1525/aa.2007.109.2.273

Resource reading: Boyette, A. H. (2016). Children's play and culture learning in an egalitarian foraging society. Child Development, 87(3), 759-769. doi:10.1111/cdev.12496

Resource reading: Doctoroff, S. (2001). Adapting the physical environment to meet the needs of all young children for play. Early Childhood Education Journal, 29(2), 105-109. doi:10.1023/A:1012524929004

 

 

 

Week 7: Monday 7th Sept                    Lecture: “Extending and enhancing play and inquiry”

Two required readings:

From textbook: Van Hoorn, J., Monighan Nourot, P., Scales, B., & Alward, K. (2019b). Orchestrating play: Interactions with children. In Y. Colliver (Ed.), Play and inquiry in early childhood (4th ed., pp. 160–189). Sydney, Australia: Pearson.

Resource reading: Cheeseman, S. (2012). Responding to children’s play. National Quality Standard (NQS) Professional Learning Program (PLP) e-¬‐newsletter, 34, 1‐4. Retrieved from: http://www.earlychildhoodaustralia.org.au/nqsplp/wp-content/uploads/2012/05/NQS_PLP_E-Newsletter_No34.pdf

 

Stimulus reading:

Resource reading: Dombro, A. L., Jablon, J R. & Stetson, C. (2011). Powerful interactions. Young Children, 66(1), 12-16. Retrieved from http://www.jstor.org/stable/42730691

 

NOTE (internal students): practical preparation for Assignment 2 will be completed in this week's tutorial (instructions will be provided on how to prepare for this online). External students will complete practical preparation during Online-Campus Session 1 (OCS1)

Mon 14th Sept–Fri 25th Sept: Mid-Session Break

Wednesday 16th Sept: Online-campus Day 1 (external students only)

Assignment 2 due 11:59pm Sunday 20th Sept (internal students; 27th Sept externals)

             

               

MODULE 3: OPPORTUNITIES FOR DEVELOPMENT AND LEARNING

Week 8: Monday 28th September         Lecture: “Play and technology”

Two required readings:

From textbook: Fleer, M. & Jane,. B. (2019). Popular culture and children’s technological childhood. In Y. Colliver (Ed.), Play and inquiry in early childhood (4th ed., pp. 236–254). Sydney, Australia: Pearson.

Resource reading: Verenikina, I., Kervin, L., Rivera, M. C., & Lidbetter, A. (2016). Digital play: Exploring young children’s perspectives on applications designed for preschoolers. Global Studies of Childhood, 6(4), 388-399. doi: 10.1177/2043610616676036

 

Two stimulus readings:

Resource reading: Edwards, S., & Bird, J. Observing and assessing young children’s digital play in the early years: Using the Digital Play Framework. Journal of Early Childhood Research,1-7. doi:10.1177/1476718X15579746

Resource reading: Donahoo, D. (2016). We have a responsibility. Every Child, 22(2), 16-17. Retrieved from https://search.informit.com.au/documentSummary;dn=124354894402824;res=IELAPA

 

 

 

Week 9: Monday 5th October               Lecture: “Imagination and creativity”

Two required readings:

From textbook: Van Hoorn, J., Monighan Nourot, P., Scales, B., & Alward, K. (2019c). Play as the cornerstone of development: The literature. In Y. Colliver (Ed.), Play and inquiry in early childhood (4th ed., pp. 255-276). Sydney, Australia: Pearson. [Read only pp. 255–260; i.e. from Chapter start to ‘Play and the development of language and literacy’ and then pp.263–271; from ‘Play and logical-mathematical thinking’ to ‘Play and social-moral development’]

From textbook: MacNaughton, G., & Williams, G. (2019b). Problem solving. In Y. Colliver (Ed.), Play and inquiry in early childhood). (4th ed., pp. 277–291). Sydney, Australia: Pearson.

 

Three stimulus readings:

From textbook: Isenberg, J. P. & Jalongo, M. R. (2019). Understanding children's creative thought and expression. In Y. Colliver (Ed.), Play and inquiry in early childhood (4th ed., pp. 292–328). Sydney, Australia: Pearson. NB: NOT the 6TH edition (Jalongo & Narey, 2014)

Resource reading: Saracho, O. (2002). Young children's creativity and pretend play. Early Child Development and Care, 172(5), 431-438. doi:10.1080/03004430214553

Resource reading: Leong, D. J., & Bodrova, E. (2012). Assessing and Scaffolding Make-Believe Play. YC Young Children, 67(1), 28-34. Retrieved from www.naeyc.org/yc

 

Note: Assignment 3 (Quiz 1) due end of this week.

 

Week 10: Monday 12th October                       Lecture: “Language and literacy in play”

Three required readings:

From textbook: Van Hoorn, J., Monighan Nourot, P., Scales, B., & Alward, K. (2019c). Play as the cornerstone of development: The literature. In Y. Colliver (Ed.), Play and inquiry in early childhood (4th ed., pp. 255-276). Sydney, Australia: Pearson. [Read only pp. 260–263; i.e. from ‘Play and the development of language and literacy’ to ‘Play and logical-mathematical thinking’]

From textbook: Van Hoorn, J., Monighan Nourot, P., Scales, B., & Alward, K. (2019d). Language, literacy and play. In Y. Colliver (Ed.), Play and inquiry in early childhood (4th ed., pp. 329–359). Sydney, Australia: Pearson.

From textbook: Bredekamp, S. (2019a). Teaching children to communicate: Language, literacy. In Y. Colliver (Ed.), Play and inquiry in early childhood (4th ed., pp. 360–401). Sydney, Australia: Pearson.

 

Two stimulus readings:

1. Stimulus article: Collins, K.M. and Griess, C. (2011). It’s all in the game: Designing and playing board games as a means of fostering the many ways children communicate. YC Young Children, 12-19. Retrieved from http://www.naeyc.org/yc

2. Stimulus article: Blake, S. (2009). Engage, investigate, and report: Enhancing the curriculum with scientific inquiry. YC Young Children, 64(6), 49-53. Retrieved from http://www.jstor.org/stable/42731050

Note: Assignment 3 (Quiz 2) due end of this week.

 

 

Week 11: Monday 19th October                       Lecture: “Physical wellbeing and development in play”

Two required readings:

From e-Book: Adolph, K. E., & Robinson, S. R. (2015). Motor Development. In L. Liben & U. Muller (Eds.), Handbook of Child Psychology and Developmental Science (7th ed., Vol. 2: Cognitive processes, pp. 113-157). New York, NY: John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Retrieved from https://ebookcentral-proquest-com.simsrad.net.ocs.mq.edu.au/lib/MQU/reader.action?docID=1895801&ppg=141 [Read only pp. 120–124; From “Stereotypies and Flails” until “Variability: Problem and Promise”]

From textbook: Bredekamp, S. (2019b). Teaching Children to be healthy and fit. In Y. Colliver (Ed.), Play and inquiry in early childhood (4th ed., pp. 402–433). Sydney, Australia: Pearson.

 

Two stimulus readings:

From e-book: Wyver, S., Tranter, P., Sandseter, E.B.H., Naughton, G., Little, H., Bundy, A., Ragen, J., & Engelen, L. (2012). Places to play outdoors: Sedentary and safe or active and risky? In P. Whiteman & K. De Gioia, (Eds.). Children and childhoods: Contemporary perspectives, places and practices (pp. 85-107). Newcastle upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Publishing. Retrieved from https://ebookcentral-proquest-com.simsrad.net.ocs.mq.edu.au/lib/mqu/reader.action?docID=1080657&ppg=5

From e-book: Luchs, A. (2017). Assessing free play behaviour in urban play spaces. In T. Waller, E. Ärlemalm-Hagsér, E. Hansen-Sandseter, L. Lee-Hammond, K. Lekies, & S. Wyver (Eds.), The SAGE Handbook of Outdoor Play and Learning (pp. 264-278). London, England: Sage. Retrieved from https://ebookcentral-proquest-com.simsrad.net.ocs.mq.edu.au/lib/MQU/reader.action?docID=4880686&ppg=293.

Note: Assignment 3 (Quiz 3) due end of this week.

 

 

Week 12: Monday 26th October           Lecture: “Social development and relationships”

Two required readings:

From textbook: Bredekamp, S. (2019c). Teaching children to live in a democratic society: Socio-emotional learning and social studies In Y. Colliver (Ed.), Play and inquiry in early childhood (4th ed., pp. 434–463). Sydney, Australia: Pearson.

From textbook: Van Hoorn, J., Monighan Nourot, P., Scales, B., & Alward, K. (2019c). Play as the cornerstone of development: The literature. In Y. Colliver (Ed.), Play and inquiry in early childhood (4th ed., pp. 255-276). Sydney, Australia: Pearson. [Read only pp.270-275; From ‘Play and social-moral development’ to chapter end]­­

 

Three stimulus readings:

From e-book: Degotardi, S. & Pearson, E (2016). Infant play: how interactions build and support relationships. In M. Ebbeck and M. Waniganayeke (Eds.), Children’s play in early childhood education: Facilitating learning in diverse contexts (2nd ed., pp. 76-95). Sydney, Australia: Oxford University Press. Retrieved from https://ebookcentral-proquest-com.simsrad.net.ocs.mq.edu.au/lib/mqu/reader.action?docID=5306373&ppg=7

Resource reading: Broadhead, P. (2010). Building friendship through playful learning in the early years. In J. Moyles, The Excellence of play (3rd Ed., pp. 216-228). Maidenhead, England: Open University Press

From e-book: Nicolopoulou , A. (2018) Pretend and social pretend play complexities, continuities, and controversies of a research field. In P. Smith & J. Roopnarine (Eds.), The Cambridge Handbook of Play: Developmental and Disciplinary Perspectives (Cambridge Handbooks in Psychology, pp. 183-199). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

 

Note: Assignment 3 (Quiz 4) due end of this week.

Saturday 31st October: Online-campus Day 2 (external students only)

ASSIGNMENT 4 due 11:59pm Sunday 8th November

Policies and Procedures

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central (https://staff.mq.edu.au/work/strategy-planning-and-governance/university-policies-and-procedures/policy-central). Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Students seeking more policy resources can visit the Student Policy Gateway (https://students.mq.edu.au/support/study/student-policy-gateway). It is your one-stop-shop for the key policies you need to know about throughout your undergraduate student journey.

If you would like to see all the policies relevant to Learning and Teaching visit Policy Central (https://staff.mq.edu.au/work/strategy-planning-and-governance/university-policies-and-procedures/policy-central).

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/study/getting-started/student-conduct​

Results

Results published on platform other than eStudent, (eg. iLearn, Coursera etc.) or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent. For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au or if you are a Global MBA student contact globalmba.support@mq.edu.au

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Learning Skills

Learning Skills (mq.edu.au/learningskills) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to help you improve your marks and take control of your study.

The Library provides online and face to face support to help you find and use relevant information resources. 

Student Enquiry Service

For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at ask.mq.edu.au

If you are a Global MBA student contact globalmba.support@mq.edu.au

Equity Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

IT Help

For help with University computer systems and technology, visit http://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/information_technology/help/

When using the University's IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use of IT Resources Policy. The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network including students.

Changes since First Published

Date Description
30/09/2020 Updated due date of final asst to 8th Nov rather than 3rd Nov in "unit schedule"
28/07/2020 Have updated changed OCS1 from 14/9 to 16/9 to accommodate clash with ECHE1180
10/07/2020 Some of the estimated work hours for each asst were slightly different from what was in the CMS - i have now updated these.