Students

ABST3040 – Settler Colonialism, Decolonisation and Indigenous Futures

2021 – Session 1, Weekday attendance, North Ryde

Notice

As part of Phase 3 of our return to campus plan, most units will now run tutorials, seminars and other small group activities on campus, and most will keep an online version available to those students unable to return or those who choose to continue their studies online.

To check the availability of face-to-face and online activities for your unit, please go to timetable viewer. To check detailed information on unit assessments visit your unit's iLearn space or consult your unit convenor.

General Information

Download as PDF
Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff
Bronwyn Carlson
Ryan Frazer
Credit points Credit points
10
Prerequisites Prerequisites
130cp at 1000 level or above
Corequisites Corequisites
Co-badged status Co-badged status
Unit description Unit description

This unit provides an overview and critical analysis of Indigenous–settler politics in Australia. Students will develop a nuanced, critically-informed understanding of settler colonialism as a political structure, and explore how it manifests through both policy and institutional cultures in Australia. The unit then turns to practices of decolonisation, unpacking the role of political protests, land claims and non-Indigenous allies in moving towards justice in the context of settler colonialism. It closes by exploring ‘Indigenous futurisms’—how Indigenous people are already both imagining and practicing a decolonised Australia—including through digital media, queer identities, and science fiction.

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at https://students.mq.edu.au/important-dates

Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of this unit, you will be able to:

  • ULO1: Demonstrate an understanding of settler colonialism as a political structure, and explore how it manifests through both policy and institutional cultures in Australia
  • ULO2: Demonstrate knowledge and scholarly understanding of practices of decolonisation
  • ULO3: Demonstrate comprehensive knowledge of the role of political protests, land claims and non-Indigenous allies in moving towards justice in the context of settler colonialism
  • ULO4: Demonstrate ability to produce effective critically engaged arguments through rigorous engagement with academic resources
  • ULO5: Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of how Indigenous people are already both imagining and practicing a decolonised Australia—including through digital media, queer identities, and science fiction.

General Assessment Information

Late Submission Penalty

Unless a Special Consideration request has been submitted and approved, (a) a penalty for lateness will apply – two (2) marks out of 100 will be deducted per day for assignments submitted after the due date – and (b) no assignment will be accepted more than seven (7) days (incl. weekends) after the original submission deadline. No late submissions will be accepted for timed assessments – e.g. quizzes, online tests. 

 

Terminology protocols for Indigenous Studies

In Australia there are two distinct Indigenous peoples: Aboriginal people and Torres Strait Islander people.

When writing about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders do not use the acronym ‘ATSI’, write in full. Capital letters should always be used when referring to Aboriginal peoples and or Torres Strait Islander peoples. 

While Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander are acceptable terms to use, it should be recognised that these are collective terms and often used improperly to impose a single identity on the many different communities.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people generally prefer to be known by the language/cultural groups or communities, to which they belong, that is, own names rather than terms such 'the Aboriginals' or 'the Islanders'. For example, Aboriginal people in the area surrounding Macquarie University may refer to themselves as Dharug. It is important that you always check the correct name or terms to use for people in the area/region.

The use of incorrect, inappropriate or dated terminology is to be avoided as it can give offence. Many historical terms or those in common usage some years ago are now not acceptable, including terms such as 'aborigine' ‘native’, ‘savage’ and ‘primitive’. Similarly, do not use the terms ‘half-caste’, ‘part-Aborigine/Aboriginal’ or any reference to skin colour or physical features, as they do not signify that a person is Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander and may cause offence. When quoting from academic or other sources that uses inappropriate, dated terminology or racists language, use (sic) directly after the inappropriate term of phrase, thus calling attention to the fact that it has been sourced from the original and that you understand it to be outdated, inappropriate or problematic in the contemporary context.

 

For more information please refer to the Terminology Guide available in iLearn.

 

Referencing 

Referencing is an essential component of academic writing or presentation since it enables the reader to follow up the source of ideas and information presented in your work, and to examine the interpretation you place on the material discovered in your research. Reliable referencing clearly indicates where you have drawn your own conclusions from the evidence presented. Importantly, much of the material you will use is covered by copyright which means that you must acknowledge any source of information, including books, journals, newsprint, images and the internet. It is obligatory for students to reference all sources used in their written work including electronic material. Students should consult the University library website for a detailed explanation and examples of how to reference electronic material correctly Different programs use different referencing styles to reflect the needs of their discipline. It is the student’s responsibility to check which referencing style is used. Indigenous Studies use the Harvard referencing style. 

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Hurdle Due
Content Quizzes 30% No Week 5 (22/3/21), Week 9, (3/5/21), Week 13, (31/5/21)
Minor Essay 30% No Week 7, Friday 23rd April 2021
Major Essay 40% No Week 12, Friday 31st May 2021

Content Quizzes

Assessment Type 1: Quiz/Test
Indicative Time on Task 2: 15 hours
Due: Week 5 (22/3/21), Week 9, (3/5/21), Week 13, (31/5/21)
Weighting: 30%

 

Students will complete 3x quizzes (10% each) with 12 questions on the relevant theme, opening the week following the last week on that theme (weeks 5, 9, 13)

 


On successful completion you will be able to:
  • Demonstrate an understanding of settler colonialism as a political structure, and explore how it manifests through both policy and institutional cultures in Australia
  • Demonstrate knowledge and scholarly understanding of practices of decolonisation
  • Demonstrate comprehensive knowledge of the role of political protests, land claims and non-Indigenous allies in moving towards justice in the context of settler colonialism
  • Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of how Indigenous people are already both imagining and practicing a decolonised Australia—including through digital media, queer identities, and science fiction.

Minor Essay

Assessment Type 1: Essay
Indicative Time on Task 2: 25 hours
Due: Week 7, Friday 23rd April 2021
Weighting: 30%

 

Students will complete a minor 1500 word essay on settler colonialism. Students must articulate what constitutes settler colonialism and then discuss how it manifests in concrete ways in Australia (policy eras, income management, education, health).

 


On successful completion you will be able to:
  • Demonstrate an understanding of settler colonialism as a political structure, and explore how it manifests through both policy and institutional cultures in Australia
  • Demonstrate knowledge and scholarly understanding of practices of decolonisation
  • Demonstrate comprehensive knowledge of the role of political protests, land claims and non-Indigenous allies in moving towards justice in the context of settler colonialism
  • Demonstrate ability to produce effective critically engaged arguments through rigorous engagement with academic resources

Major Essay

Assessment Type 1: Essay
Indicative Time on Task 2: 40 hours
Due: Week 12, Friday 31st May 2021
Weighting: 40%

 

Students will complete a 2500 word essay. Questions will be provided on the iLearn site, but will focus on either decolonisation or Indigenous futures.

 


On successful completion you will be able to:
  • Demonstrate an understanding of settler colonialism as a political structure, and explore how it manifests through both policy and institutional cultures in Australia
  • Demonstrate knowledge and scholarly understanding of practices of decolonisation
  • Demonstrate comprehensive knowledge of the role of political protests, land claims and non-Indigenous allies in moving towards justice in the context of settler colonialism
  • Demonstrate ability to produce effective critically engaged arguments through rigorous engagement with academic resources
  • Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of how Indigenous people are already both imagining and practicing a decolonised Australia—including through digital media, queer identities, and science fiction.

1 If you need help with your assignment, please contact:

  • the academic teaching staff in your unit for guidance in understanding or completing this type of assessment
  • the Learning Skills Unit for academic skills support.

2 Indicative time-on-task is an estimate of the time required for completion of the assessment task and is subject to individual variation

Delivery and Resources

Online units can be accessed at: http://ilearn.mq.edu.au/

Students are to listen to engage with all material on ilearn.

PC and Internet access are required. Basic computer skills (e.g. internet browsing) and skills in word processing are also a requirement.

Please consult teaching staff for any further, more specific requirements.

Policies and Procedures

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central (https://staff.mq.edu.au/work/strategy-planning-and-governance/university-policies-and-procedures/policy-central). Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Students seeking more policy resources can visit the Student Policy Gateway (https://students.mq.edu.au/support/study/student-policy-gateway). It is your one-stop-shop for the key policies you need to know about throughout your undergraduate student journey.

If you would like to see all the policies relevant to Learning and Teaching visit Policy Central (https://staff.mq.edu.au/work/strategy-planning-and-governance/university-policies-and-procedures/policy-central).

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/admin/other-resources/student-conduct

Results

Results published on platform other than eStudent, (eg. iLearn, Coursera etc.) or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent. For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au or if you are a Global MBA student contact globalmba.support@mq.edu.au

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Learning Skills

Learning Skills (mq.edu.au/learningskills) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to help you improve your marks and take control of your study.

The Library provides online and face to face support to help you find and use relevant information resources. 

Student Enquiry Service

For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at ask.mq.edu.au

If you are a Global MBA student contact globalmba.support@mq.edu.au

Equity Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

IT Help

For help with University computer systems and technology, visit http://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/information_technology/help/

When using the University's IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use of IT Resources Policy. The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network including students.