Students

BMOL1001 – Biomolecules

2021 – Session 1, Weekday attendance, North Ryde

Notice

As part of Phase 3 of our return to campus plan, most units will now run tutorials, seminars and other small group activities on campus, and most will keep an online version available to those students unable to return or those who choose to continue their studies online.

To check the availability of face-to-face and online activities for your unit, please go to timetable viewer. To check detailed information on unit assessments visit your unit's iLearn space or consult your unit convenor.

General Information

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Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit Convenor
Phani Rekha Potluri
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14 ER 306
Lecturer
Anwar Sunna
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Lecturer
Morten Andersen
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Lecturer
Joanne Jamie
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Lecturer
Robert Willows
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Lecturer
Ian Blair
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Lecturer
Julie Atkin
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Lecturer
Sophie Goodchild
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Lecturer
Albert Lee
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Credit points Credit points
10
Prerequisites Prerequisites
Admission to BClinSc
Corequisites Corequisites
Co-badged status Co-badged status
Unit description Unit description

This unit is an intensive blended unit which provides students with an understanding of fundamental concepts and principles in chemistry and biochemistry in a clinical context. The unit commences with Module 1 "Biomolecules". The focus of this first module is on the structure and reactivity of the four major groups of biomolecules (lipids, proteins, nucleic acids, and carbohydrates). Discussion of each of these five groups allows for the integration of topics from the three traditional areas of general chemistry, introductory organic chemistry and biochemistry. The second module "Metabolism" draws on the concepts presented in the "Biomolecules" module and re-integrates them to fully develop the concepts of biomolecules as energy yielding compounds. Discussion in this second module is focused on metabolic considerations of carbohydrates, proteins and fats, and leads to discussion of topics such as obesity, dieting, fitness and disease. Through the participation in an integrated series of hands-on 'Molecules' workshops, students will work with biochemically active 'real-life' biomolecules of clinical importance and build a portfolio of biochemical properties of several biomolecules throughout the unit.

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at https://students.mq.edu.au/important-dates

Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of this unit, you will be able to:

  • ULO1: Explain and relate general chemistry and organic chemistry principles applicable to the discipline of clinical science.
  • ULO2: Name and write (or describe) structures for representative molecules of the major classes of biochemicals/biomolecules found in the human body.
  • ULO3: Describe the structure and properties of biomolecules using chemical and biochemical concepts.
  • ULO4: Predict chemical and physical behaviours of molecules from their structures.
  • ULO5: Define and describe key biochemical concepts for the major biological systems involved in metabolism and energy production pathways in the living cell.
  • ULO6: Utilise foundational learning skills including active engagement in their learning processes.

General Assessment Information

Assignment Submission

In general, this is a paperless unit so no assignments or quizzes will be physically handed in. You will be required to submit all assignments through iLearn via a Turnitin link. Turnitin is an online program that detects plagiarised pieces of work. It compares not only work between students in the current year but also across previous years, across institutions, with all published materials, and the internet. Do not under any circumstances lend your work to another student. If that student plagiarises your work you too will be liable. The penalties imposed by the University for plagiarism are serious and may include expulsion from the University. ANY evidence of plagiarism WILL be dealt with according to University policy. A full outline of the Universities policy on plagiarism is found at http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/academic_honesty/policy.html. It is your responsibility to ensure all documents submitted or uploaded in ilearn are the correct file(s) and readable by the person marking your assignment. If files cannot be read, then late penalties will apply until re-submission of the work occurs.

Extensions and penalties

10% will be deducted for each day (up to and including any time in the 24 hr period) if an assignment is late. This includes each day of a weekend. If you are unable to submit the assignment by the due date then an extension must be sought BEFORE the due date unless this is absolutely impossible. Notification after the event of an "anticipatable" absence will not be looked upon favourably. To support your extension, you must submit a "Special Consideration Request" request via www.ask.mq.edu.au. See https://students.mq.edu.au/study/my-study-program/special-consideration for instructions on how to do this. Please note that evidence must be given to support your request for an extension. Applications must also be made within five working days of the assessment task due date. Decisions to approve/not approve a special consideration request are made by the university (and NOT the unit convenor).

Marks released on iLearn

 It is your responsibility to check that marks released on iLearn are accurate. Note, marks released on iLearn do not have late penalties applied. Late penalties are applied AFTER marking of the submitted work. See extensions and penalties section of this document.

Attendance at workshops

There are 4 workshops in total. These are 4 offerings of the workshops in weeks 3 (lipids), 6 (proteins), 9 (sugars) and 12 (nucleic acids). You must attend the workshop you have been allocated. Attendance at all 4 workshops is compulsory The GAMSAT style quiz can only be done during the 2 hour workshop.There is a strict time limit for each quiz (15 minutes) to simulate the pace/pressure required when sitting the GAMSAT exam. The quiz will only be available during the first OR last 30 minutes of the Workshop and is worth 5% of the total grade.

If you are absent from a workshop, then a Special Consideration Request must be submitted (see above). Workshops are also a hurdle requirement: you must attend and participate in at least 3 of the 4 workshops to pass the unit. If your absence from a workshop is approved by special consideration then an average mark from all other workshop reports will be given. An unexplained absence from a workshop (ie your absence was not approved by special consideration) will result in ZERO marks for the missed workshop. Missing two or more workshops will result in failure of the unit.

Further details of workshop content and workshop questions are available through the iLearn site.

Final Exam

The final exam (45%) will be 2 hours in length with 10 minutes reading time. It is designed to address specific understanding of all the topics presented within the course and to show that the knowledge obtained can be applied to new problems. It will cover ALL material from the lectures and workshops.

Supplementary Exam

If you apply for a supplementary examination, you must make yourself available for the formal examination period. If you are not available at that time, there is no guarantee an additional examination time will be offered. Specific examination dates and times will be advised at a later date.

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Hurdle Due
Workshop reports 20% Yes Weeks 4,7,10,13
Mid-semester test 15% No Week 6
Molecule Project Report 15% No Week 7 and Week 11
Short Quizzes 5% No Week 3, 6, 9 and 12
Final Examination 45% No University Examination Period

Workshop reports

Assessment Type 1: Report
Indicative Time on Task 2: 20 hours
Due: Weeks 4,7,10,13
Weighting: 20%
This is a hurdle assessment task (see assessment policy for more information on hurdle assessment tasks)

 

Four reports based on the four workshops on: 1. Lipids; 2. Proteins; 3. Sugars; 4. Nucleic Acids.

 


On successful completion you will be able to:
  • Explain and relate general chemistry and organic chemistry principles applicable to the discipline of clinical science.
  • Name and write (or describe) structures for representative molecules of the major classes of biochemicals/biomolecules found in the human body.
  • Describe the structure and properties of biomolecules using chemical and biochemical concepts.
  • Predict chemical and physical behaviours of molecules from their structures.
  • Define and describe key biochemical concepts for the major biological systems involved in metabolism and energy production pathways in the living cell.
  • Utilise foundational learning skills including active engagement in their learning processes.

Mid-semester test

Assessment Type 1: Quiz/Test
Indicative Time on Task 2: 12 hours
Due: Week 6
Weighting: 15%

 

A mid-semester test (multiple choice) will be held as detailed on iLearn.

 


On successful completion you will be able to:
  • Explain and relate general chemistry and organic chemistry principles applicable to the discipline of clinical science.
  • Name and write (or describe) structures for representative molecules of the major classes of biochemicals/biomolecules found in the human body.

Molecule Project Report

Assessment Type 1: Essay
Indicative Time on Task 2: 12 hours
Due: Week 7 and Week 11
Weighting: 15%

 

One short written essay (~1,000 words). The essay is in two parts: Part A (bibliography/literature search) is due at the end of week 7 and is worth 5%. Part B (essay) is due at the end of week 11 and is worth 10%. Details of the assignment will be given on ilearn by end of week 3. Assignments will be submitted through ilearn and checked through turnitin.

 


On successful completion you will be able to:
  • Explain and relate general chemistry and organic chemistry principles applicable to the discipline of clinical science.
  • Name and write (or describe) structures for representative molecules of the major classes of biochemicals/biomolecules found in the human body.
  • Describe the structure and properties of biomolecules using chemical and biochemical concepts.
  • Predict chemical and physical behaviours of molecules from their structures.
  • Utilise foundational learning skills including active engagement in their learning processes.

Short Quizzes

Assessment Type 1: Quiz/Test
Indicative Time on Task 2: 2 hours
Due: Week 3, 6, 9 and 12
Weighting: 5%

 

During each Workshop, you will complete a short multiple-choice GAMSAT style quiz (4 in total). The quiz can only be done in the workshops and attendance for entire workshop is compulsory. There is a strict time limit for each quiz (15 minutes) to simulate the pace/pressure required when sitting the GAMSAT exam. The quiz will only be available during the first OR last 30 minutes of the Workshop and is worth 5% of the total grade.

 


On successful completion you will be able to:
  • Explain and relate general chemistry and organic chemistry principles applicable to the discipline of clinical science.
  • Name and write (or describe) structures for representative molecules of the major classes of biochemicals/biomolecules found in the human body.
  • Describe the structure and properties of biomolecules using chemical and biochemical concepts.
  • Predict chemical and physical behaviours of molecules from their structures.
  • Define and describe key biochemical concepts for the major biological systems involved in metabolism and energy production pathways in the living cell.
  • Utilise foundational learning skills including active engagement in their learning processes.

Final Examination

Assessment Type 1: Examination
Indicative Time on Task 2: 18 hours
Due: University Examination Period
Weighting: 45%

 

The final exam (45%) will be 3 hours in length with 10 minutes reading time. It is designed to address specific understanding of all the topics presented within the course and to show that the knowledge obtained can be applied to new problems.

 


On successful completion you will be able to:
  • Explain and relate general chemistry and organic chemistry principles applicable to the discipline of clinical science.
  • Name and write (or describe) structures for representative molecules of the major classes of biochemicals/biomolecules found in the human body.
  • Describe the structure and properties of biomolecules using chemical and biochemical concepts.
  • Predict chemical and physical behaviours of molecules from their structures.
  • Define and describe key biochemical concepts for the major biological systems involved in metabolism and energy production pathways in the living cell.
  • Utilise foundational learning skills including active engagement in their learning processes.

1 If you need help with your assignment, please contact:

  • the academic teaching staff in your unit for guidance in understanding or completing this type of assessment
  • the Learning Skills Unit for academic skills support.

2 Indicative time-on-task is an estimate of the time required for completion of the assessment task and is subject to individual variation

Delivery and Resources

BMOL1001 is a 10-credit-point, one semester unit, comprising:

  • Lectures: two one-hour lectures a week.
  • Workshop: four two-hour workshops (enrol into one of six sessions available). Bring your own laptop (labcoats are not required).
  • Self-Study: there is an expectation that you will also engage in study of the material outside of the formal face-to-face contact.

In order to complete (and do well) in this unit you must:

  • Participate in all workshop sessions and submit workshop reports by the specified dates. To pass the unit, you must participate in at least 3 out of 4 workshops (unless special consideration is approved).
  • Attempt the 4 short quizzes held at the end of each workshop.
  • Submit Part A and Part B of the written assignment.
  • Attempt the mid-session test (50 minutes), held during a standard lecture time.
  • Sit the final examination of (2 hours), held during the examination period.

An unsatisfactory performance in the final examination or the written assignments (including workshop reports) may result in a fail grade being given, regardless of your overall aggregate score.

BMOL1001 Unit Web Site

The web page for BMOL1001 can be found at ilearn.mq.edu.au. The BMOL1001 iLearn web site is your primary source of data and information for this unit and will be used as a repository of lectures and workshop materials, and as a means of communication. Login to iLearn and follow the prompts to BMOL1001. You will be asked for a username and password. Your User Name is your Macquarie Student ID Number, which is an 8-digit number found on your Campus Card. The password is your myMQ Student Portal password. If you have any problems with iLearn log a ticket with OneHelp at onehelp.mq.edu.au. More information about OneHelp can be found at http://informatics.mq.edu.au/help/.

Announcements on ilearn are also emailed to your student email account. It is your responsibility to ensure your settings in iLearn are active to receive all announcements.

Recommended Texts

For GAMSAT preparation and chemistry background covered in this unit, the following text is recommended. 

Alternatively, most first year Chemistry text books should be suitable. It is also highly recommended that students have access to a Biochemistry text and we recommend the following text. 

  • Fundamentals of Biochemistry: Life at the Molecular Level, 5th Edition by Donald Voet, Judith G. Voet, Charlotte W. Pratt, Wiley. Electronic access: eBook ($65): from http://www.wileydirect.com.au/ - case studies and exercises are on WileyPLUS.

The texts can be purchased via online bookshops such as Booktopia, Amazon or as listed above. A few copies of the prescribed text are available in the library.

Lectures:

  • Lecture Recordings: Lectures will either be a recording of the lecture or a new recording that will be pre-recorded (not live) and made available. In most cases, lectures will be available at least 24 hours in advance of the scheduled lecture time. Enzymes 1 and 2 lecture recordings will not be provided in advance and the lectures takes place at the schedule time via zoom. 
  • Live support: Your lecturer will  be available ‘live’ via zoom during their timetabled lecture hour to engage with you in real-time. Please check the discussion thread for details of how and when to engage with your lecturer and for zoom links.
  • Asking Questions: There is a discussion thread for every lecture for you to ask questions and engage with the lecturer. Please post your questions in the appropriate discussion thread.

As content for this unit does not closely follow a text, it is strongly advised that you listen to ALL lectures. Students who do not attend all lectures often find it difficult to pass the Unit. It is expected that students have completed HSC Chemistry (or an equivalent bridging course). Some basic knowledge for how to perform chemistry calculations is expected. 

Workshops:  Workshops give you an opportunity to work with your peers to put your knowledge of biomolecules learnt from the lectures into practice. One aim of the workshops is to give you an understanding of the chemical structure and the importance of the four major biomolecules in our body and their relation to how we function/live, process food and their involvement in disease. You will also review basic chemical calculations and solve problems in the workshops. Additional revision material (ie HSC chemistry level) will be provided to you via ilearn to help you prepare for the workshops. 

Each workshop will begin with a short introduction and expected outcomes. You will then work through an online based workshop in small groups and perform short activities that require an individual online response. At the end (or beginning) of the workshop, a 'GAMSAT' style quiz will be done. You must attend the 2 hour workshop to participate in the quiz.

Technology Used:  We expect all students to own a laptop and this must be bought to the workshop sessions. You are expected to have access to the ilearn site and be able to download PDF files on your laptop. If you do not have your own laptop, then please advise teaching staff on this unit PRIOR to the workshop sessions. A laptop will be provided to you to use during the workshop session if you have notified the staff in advance.  Acrobat Reader can be used to view lecture material and can be downloaded from the Adobe at get.adobe.com/reader/.

Communication: All communication will be given via the iLearn site. Alerts for new announcements will also be sent to your student email account (unless you turn this feature off which is NOT recommended). It is your responsibility to check the ilearn site and your email account on a frequent basis. It is not uncommon for mail from iLearn to be initially recognised as spam. All unit-related correspondence must be conducted using your official university account.

E-mails sent to teaching staff from your private email accounts will be IGNORED. Additional learning resources: will be provided to support students without HSC chemistry or those struggling with general chemistry concepts. Details of these resources will be given on the ilearn site.

Additional learning resources/ Self Directed Learning & Study: You are expected to spend some time in reading a relevant textbook and other sources of information on fundamental chemistry and biochemistry, to review lecture material, and to self-assess your degree of understanding. An approximate estimate of the time commitment for a 10 credit point undergraduate unit of study such as BMOL1001 is 150 hours over 15 weeks (including the break) ~10 hours per week. This includes contact and non-contact hours. Some students (especially students who do not have HSC chemistry) may find that they need to devote more time than this. We will provide some additional material on ilearn to help students without HSC chemistry or those requiring the review of  general chemistry concepts. Details of these resources will be given on the ilearn site and can help you with your preparation for the workshops.

Unit Schedule

 

Week Date (week starting) Lecture 1 Tuesday: 11-12              Lecture 2 Thursday: 2-3pm    

Monday 9-11, 11-1 and 4-6:

Workshop Groups A, B and C

Thursday 9-11 and 11-1:

Workshop Groups D and E

Tuesday 4-6 pm:

Workshop Group F

1 22-Feb L1. Intro lecture PP L2. Lipids 1 SG        
2 1-Mar L3. Lipids 2 SG L4. Lipids 3 SG        
3 8-Mar L5. Proteins 1 PP L6. Proteins 2 PP   W1: Lipids W1: Lipids W1: Lipids
4 15-Mar L7. Proteins 3 PP L8. Proteins (Enzymes 1) AS        
5 22-Mar L9. Proteins (Enzymes 2) AS L10. Sugars 1 JJ        
6 29-Mar L11. Sugars 2 JJ Mid-semester test (15%)     W2: Proteins W2: Proteins W2: Proteins
  Break: 2-18th April
7 19-Apr L12. Sugars 3 JJ L13. Sugars 4 MA        
8 26-Apr L14. Sugars 5  MA L15. Nucleic Acids 1 JJ        
9 3-May L16. Nucleic Acids 2 JJ L17. Nucleic Acids 3 PP   W3: Sugars W3: Sugars W3: Sugars
10 10-May L18. Nucleic Acids 4 PP L19. Cellular Energy Processes 1 RW        
11 17-May L20. Cellular Energy Processes 2 RW L21. SI units AL        
12 24-May L22. Kingdoms and Viruses JA L23. Genome Evolution IB   W4: Nucleic Acids W4: Nucleic Acids W4: Nucleic Acids
13 31-May no lecture (study week)   no lecture (study week)          
RW  Prof Robert Willows
JJ  A/Prof Joanne Jamie
AS  Prof Anwar Sunna
MA Dr Morten Andersen
PP Dr Phani Potluri
AL Dr Albert Lee
IB Prof Ian Blair
SG Dr Sophie Goodchild
JA Prof Julie Atkin

 

Policies and Procedures

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central (https://staff.mq.edu.au/work/strategy-planning-and-governance/university-policies-and-procedures/policy-central). Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Students seeking more policy resources can visit the Student Policy Gateway (https://students.mq.edu.au/support/study/student-policy-gateway). It is your one-stop-shop for the key policies you need to know about throughout your undergraduate student journey.

If you would like to see all the policies relevant to Learning and Teaching visit Policy Central (https://staff.mq.edu.au/work/strategy-planning-and-governance/university-policies-and-procedures/policy-central).

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/admin/other-resources/student-conduct

Results

Results published on platform other than eStudent, (eg. iLearn, Coursera etc.) or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent. For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au or if you are a Global MBA student contact globalmba.support@mq.edu.au

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Learning Skills

Learning Skills (mq.edu.au/learningskills) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to help you improve your marks and take control of your study.

The Library provides online and face to face support to help you find and use relevant information resources. 

Student Enquiry Service

For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at ask.mq.edu.au

If you are a Global MBA student contact globalmba.support@mq.edu.au

Equity Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

IT Help

For help with University computer systems and technology, visit http://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/information_technology/help/

When using the University's IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use of IT Resources Policy. The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network including students.

Changes from Previous Offering

Lectures will continue to be online. Workshops are moved to on-campus. Mid-semester will be held during Week 6.