Students

AHIX1200 – Myth in the Ancient World

2021 – Session 2, Fully online/virtual

Session 2 Learning and Teaching Update

The decision has been made to conduct study online for the remainder of Session 2 for all units WITHOUT mandatory on-campus learning activities. Exams for Session 2 will also be online where possible to do so.

This is due to the extension of the lockdown orders and to provide certainty around arrangements for the remainder of Session 2. We hope to return to campus beyond Session 2 as soon as it is safe and appropriate to do so.

Some classes/teaching activities cannot be moved online and must be taught on campus. You should already know if you are in one of these classes/teaching activities and your unit convenor will provide you with more information via iLearn. If you want to confirm, see the list of units with mandatory on-campus classes/teaching activities.

Visit the MQ COVID-19 information page for more detail.

General Information

Download as PDF
Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff
Eva Anagnostou
Credit points Credit points
10
Prerequisites Prerequisites
Corequisites Corequisites
Co-badged status Co-badged status
Unit description Unit description

Gain an understanding of Greek, Roman and Near-Eastern society and culture through the study of myth. You will begin with the earliest creation myths, explore myths of gods and goddesses, heroes, Amazons, and monsters, and examine the development of myth in both literature and art. The unit is largely based upon Greek and Latin texts in translation as well as the representation of myth in Greek and Roman art. Egyptian, Near-Eastern and biblical texts will also be studied. The unit focuses on the relevance of key themes in myth to the cultures in which the myths were retold, investigating the role of myth in the religious, political and social life of the classical world.

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at https://students.mq.edu.au/important-dates

Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of this unit, you will be able to:

  • ULO1: Demonstrate knowledge of the fundamental concepts, principles and theories used in the study of myth and the content of select representative examples of myths from the ancient world.
  • ULO2: Analyze, synthesize, and evaluate information about myth in the ancient world.
  • ULO3: Create clear, coherent, evidence-based exposition of knowledge and ideas about myth in the ancient world.
  • ULO4: Communicate critical and reflective judgements effectively with teaching staff and peers.

General Assessment Information

Assessment Task 1 of 3:

Analysis of a Myth

Due: 23:59 12/9/2021 (= Sunday midnight Week 7)

Weighting: 25%

Length: 1000 words 

                                                          

Every week students will be introduced to a number of myths from ancient Greece, Rome, the ancient Near East (including Egypt), and some myths from the Aboriginal traditions. The myths will be analysed in terms of their cultural context, the genre in which they belong (oral tradition vs written tradition/ epic versus drama/ literature versus historiography), their typology (cosmogonical myths vs ritual myths vs cultural hero myths etc) and as the semester progresses through certain theoretical perspectives (structuralism and post-structuralism, functionalism, phenomenology).  

By week 7, both in the lectures and the tutorials students will be exposed to analysing myths based on their cultural context, recognizing their typology and their genre. Our analyses will combine a close reading of the ancient evidence with insights from modern scholarship. By ‘modern scholarship’ we mean work published in academic journals or monographs. You will find readings suggested for each lecture and tutorial in the ilearn site. In addition to what we refer to as essential readings, there will also be an extended list of works that can be found in the library for your perusal. Do not use general or encyclopedic style websites such as WIKIPEDIA as sources. 

For this task, students are asked to analyse a myth of their choice with regard to the myth's cultural context, its typology and/or its genre by referencing the ancient evidence and secondary literature thoroughly.

You are also required to submit a bibliography of all ancient and modern items consulted.

Please refer to the guide to referencing and essay presentation, available on the unit’s website.

Submissions which exceed the prescribed length by more than 10% will not be marked.

Submission: Submission is made electronically via the ‘assignment’ link on the unit’s webpage.

On successful completion you will be able to:

  • demonstrate knowledge of select representative examples of myths from the ancient world
  • demonstrate knowledge of the fundamental concepts and approaches used in the study of myth
  • Analyze source material, including ancient sources and modern scholarship; the critiquing of texts and application of knowledge
  • create and communicate evidence based critical and reflective judgements about ancient myths                                                                               

To Help you with your first task, here are some suggestions for mythic topics to be analysed (feel free to choose a topic of your own):

The quest for immortality in Babylonian and Greek mythology.

Gods and humans in Babylonian and Greek mythology.

Vernant and the role of sacrifice in Greek Mythology.

Myth and memory (Babylonian/Greek/aboriginal)

Pandora: Explaining ancient Greek misogyny

Heracles and the Heroic Archetype in Greek Mythology.

The role of Heracles’ parerga in Greek myth

Story Telling in the time of Hesiod. The Theogony a theology.

Polis and Piety: the relation between Athenian Theatre and Athenian politics.

The Underworld before and after the Mysteries of Eleusis.

The role of katabasis in Greek mythology.

The social aspects of Dionysian cult.

Explain the character of Prometheus in Plato’s Protagoras.

Young girl interrupted: tracing initiation patterns in the story of [Medea/Electra/ Antigone/ Helen/ Iphigenia].

Defining Alexandrian poetics.

Alexander between Myth and History.

The origins of Greek pastoral poetry.

Where do the similarities between Homer and Vergil stop?

Discuss the Aeneid as a “national” epic.

Ovid as a Silver Age poet.

Explain Herodotus’ title as the Father of History.

Ritual and myth in aboriginal communities.

Kingship and Culture (Babylonian/ Greek/Aboriginal).

The value of comparative mythology.

 

 

 

 

Assessment Task 2 of 3:

Essay

Due: 23:59 31/10/2021 = Sunday midnight Week 12 

Weighting: 50%

Length: 2000 words

Write an essay of no more than 2000 words on ONE of the topics below.

Label your work when you submit it in the following way:

§  Number of Question.Surname.Student ID number

§  (eg 4.Smith.9458767)

 

1. Discuss the extent to which theories of myth provide an explanation for Greek myth. Feel free to focus your essay on structuralism, post-structuralism, functionalism OR phenomenology.

2. Discuss the extent to which Greek mythology was influenced by myths from other cultures.

3. Discuss the extent to which Roman mythology was influenced by myths from other cultures.

4. Ancient Greek myth embraces religion, science and philosophy, in contrast to nowadays tendency to differentiate between these lines of enquiry. Discuss our approach(es) of Greek mythology in relation to the above statement.   

5. Discuss the notion of kinship in aboriginal mythology.

6. Discuss the myth of Pandora in light of the ancient Greek view on women.

7. Discuss the main aspects of Babylonian divine kingship.

8. Motifs of cosmogony in aboriginal myths.

9. Death and Afterlife in the Homeric Epics.

10. The Heroic King: Models of Kingship in Homer.

11. Explain the factors that made for Zeus’ success in winning and retaining sovereign power in the universe. How secure is Zeus’ Olympian order?   Discuss with reference to episodes from Hesiod’s Theogony.

12. Examine the profile of Zeus as king of the gods in Prometheus Bound.

13. Ancient Greek gods were often attributed human qualities which distance them significantly from nowadays perceptions about the divine. What impact did this have to the sense of piety the ancient Greeks adopted towards their gods?

14. “Monsters exist in order to be killed.”  Consider this remark in the light of your knowledge of the Odyssey.

15. In the light of some of the stories you have studied consider the significance of trickery and deception in Greek myth. Discuss with reference to famous bearers of these qualities.

16. In the light of some of the stories you have studied consider the significance of eating and swallowing in Greek myth.

17. Ritual patterns in ancient Greek drama: Antigone and Iphigeneia.

18. Compare Heracles and Dionysus as mystery gods. What do their similarities and differences tell us about the ideal Greek man?

19. The role of ritual in aboriginal culture.

20. Analyze rites of passage and discuss their social importance in ancient Greece.

21. Discuss male ritual rites in ancient Greece: from the Black Hunter to Hippolytus

22. Discuss the popularity of the Eleusinian rites in Greek/ Greco-Roman antiquity.

23. Discuss in what ways the legend of Alexander the Great complies with the traditional Greek myths you studied until now.

24. The Romans did not have a mythology of their own, but simply appropriated the Greek traditional stories about gods and heroes. Do you agree with this view?

25. Vergil, Aeneas, and Augustan Propaganda.

26. Discuss Ovid’s Metamorphoses: is his work an epic, in your opinion?

27. The use of myth in Ovid’s Metamorphoses and the didactic tradition.

28. The use of myth in Plato’s philosophy

 

How to submit your essay

Your essay is to be submitted electronically through the TURNITIN submission link.

Upload your essay through the ESSAY SUBMISSION TURNITIN link in the assessment section on the unit's main  page.

For further instructions on how to submit an assigment follow this link:       

how to submit a Turnitin assignment

On successful completion you will be able to:

  • demonstrate knowledge of select representative examples of myths from the ancient world
  • Identify theoretical approaches taken in the study of myth
  • Analyze source material, including ancient sources and modern scholarship; the critiquing of texts and application of knowledge
  • create and communicate evidence based critical and reflective judgements about ancient myths                                                                             
  • Synthesize acquired knowledge and understanding to produce a critical analytical essay

 

Assessment Task 3 of 3

Online Quizzes

Due: 23:59 8/8/2021; 23:59 22/8/2021; 23:59 5/9/2021; 23:59 3/10/2021; 23:59 17/10/2021 (= Sunday midnight of weeks 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10).

Weighting: 5 quizzes x 5% each = 25%

Format/length: each quiz will comprise of 15 multiple choice answers and will be marked automatically. The quizzes are timed.

These are short online quizzes on the material covered in the lecture topics. Access to each quiz is through the unit’s website. You may take the quizzes at any time during the specific week, but you may take each quiz only once. Maximum time allowed for each quiz is 45 mins (for 15 questions per each quiz). These quizzes are instead of an exam: there is no formal examination for the unit. In addition, they help you keep track of your progress and your readings on a weekly basis.

You are advised to complete each quiz after listening to the relevant lectures: since the quizzes are every two weeks, they will cover material for the previous two weeks; for example, the quiz of week 2 will cover material from weeks 1 and 2. It may be useful to have the lecture notes (pdf) open while you attempt the quiz. Access to the quizzes will be given on Wednesday morning of the week each quiz is due (because Wed is when we have the second lecture of the week) and until Sunday midnight of the particular week. Please do not start a quiz until you are ready to answer the questions! In the past some students opened a quiz to see how it worked: once opened the quiz must be completed as you may take each quiz only once.

On successful completion you will be able to:

  • Demonstrate concrete knowledge of the myths we have studied, and the theoretical approaches used for their study.
  • Practice and demonstrate your ability to exercise critical thinking about ancient when presented with multiple-choice responses.

Late Assessment Submission Penalty

Unless a Special Consideration request has been submitted and approved, (a) a penalty for lateness will apply – 10 marks out of 100 credit will be deducted per day for assignments submitted after the due date – and (b) no assignment will be accepted seven days (incl. weekends) after the original submission deadline.

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Hurdle Due
Analysis of a Myth 25% No 23:59 12/9/2021
Essay 50% No 23:59 31/10/2021
Quizzes 25% No 23:59 8/8/2021; 22/8/2021; 5/9/2021; 3/10/2021; 17/10/2021

Analysis of a Myth

Assessment Type 1: Case study/analysis
Indicative Time on Task 2: 15 hours
Due: 23:59 12/9/2021
Weighting: 25%

A short written paper in which you analyse a myth: your word limit is 1000 words. Submit answers to the questions set through the Turnitin link in the unit's ilearn page. Further details on this task are on the unit's ilearn page.


On successful completion you will be able to:
  • Demonstrate knowledge of the fundamental concepts, principles and theories used in the study of myth and the content of select representative examples of myths from the ancient world.
  • Analyze, synthesize, and evaluate information about myth in the ancient world.
  • Create clear, coherent, evidence-based exposition of knowledge and ideas about myth in the ancient world.

Essay

Assessment Type 1: Essay
Indicative Time on Task 2: 30 hours
Due: 23:59 31/10/2021
Weighting: 50%

This is a longer written assessment task: your word limit is 2000 words. You will be given a choice of topics in the Essay section of the unit's iLearn site. Submit your essay through the Turnitin link in the unit's ilearn page. Further details on this task and how to complete it successfully are on the unit's ilearn page.


On successful completion you will be able to:
  • Demonstrate knowledge of the fundamental concepts, principles and theories used in the study of myth and the content of select representative examples of myths from the ancient world.
  • Analyze, synthesize, and evaluate information about myth in the ancient world.
  • Create clear, coherent, evidence-based exposition of knowledge and ideas about myth in the ancient world.
  • Communicate critical and reflective judgements effectively with teaching staff and peers.

Quizzes

Assessment Type 1: Quiz/Test
Indicative Time on Task 2: 15 hours
Due: 23:59 8/8/2021; 22/8/2021; 5/9/2021; 3/10/2021; 17/10/2021
Weighting: 25%

These are short online quizzes on the material covered in the lectures and tutorials. Access to the quizzes is through links in the ilearn page.


On successful completion you will be able to:
  • Demonstrate knowledge of the fundamental concepts, principles and theories used in the study of myth and the content of select representative examples of myths from the ancient world.

1 If you need help with your assignment, please contact:

  • the academic teaching staff in your unit for guidance in understanding or completing this type of assessment
  • the Learning Skills Unit for academic skills support.

2 Indicative time-on-task is an estimate of the time required for completion of the assessment task and is subject to individual variation

Delivery and Resources

Delivery

The unit will be delivered via 2 online, live lectures over 12 weeks. Each lecture will be followed by an 1 hour weekly tutorial. Most tutorials are face to face (Tues 2-3 and 3-4; Friday 10-11, 11-12, 12-1, 2-3 and 3-4) but there is also an online tutorial (Wed 11-12).  

Resources

All the materials, primary and secondary, needed for this course will be uploaded in the ilearn website. You will have access to this material from the start of the semester and you will be able to pace your progress. If, however, you wish to make a head-start, feel free to consult the following:  

Classical Myth: Homepage (uvic.ca)

Handouts and Weblinks for Classical Mythology (CLAS230 Monmouth College)

Classical Mythology, Ninth Edition (oup.com)

Classics Unveiled - Main Page

Encyclopedia Mythica (pantheon.org)

Greek Mythology (mythweb.com)

The best source for classical texts on the Internet: Perseus Digital Library (tufts.edu) 

The texts are available here in English translation and in the original Greek with links to online lexical and grammatical aids. All Perseus texts are linked to explanatory notes, maps, images, and other resources. There is also a searchable hypertext encyclopedia: Perseus Encyclopedia, Abacus, Abacus (tufts.edu)

Greek Myth Resources (ysu.edu)Greek Gods & Goddesses | Theoi Greek Mythology

A Useful and Long Bibliography on Myth (not to scare you, hopefully, but enthuse you preferably!)

DEFINING ‘Myth’:

Csapo, E. 2005.Theories of Mythology. Malden MA: Blackwell Publishing. 

Sebeok, T.A. 1955. Myth: A Symposium. Bloomington: U. Indiana Press (ISBN 0-253-20083-0) ["The structural Study of Myth," by Claude Levi-Strauss]

Kirk, G. 1970. Myth: Its Meaning and Functions in Ancient and Other Cultures. Berkeley: U. of California (ISBN 0-520-02389-7) (also other editions, Penguin)

Littleton, C.S. 1973. The New Comparative Mythology: An anthropological Assessment of the Theories of Georges Dumezil. Berkeley: U. of California, revised edition) (ISBN 0-520-02403-6)

Fromm, E. 1951. The Forgotten Language: An Introduction to the Understanding of Dreams, Fairy Tales and Myth. New York: Grove Press [Freudian]

Bettelheim, B. 1976. The Uses of Enchantment: The Meaning and Importance of Fairy Tales. New York: Random House/Vintage (ISBN 0-394-72265-5) [Jungian]

Polti, G. 1916. The Thirty-six Dramatic Situations (trans. L. Ray). Ridgewood, NJ: the Editor Company [available on books.google.com]

Aarne, A. and S. Thompson. 1973. The Types of the Folktale: A Classification and Bibliography 2nd revised edition. Helsinki: Academia Scientiarum Fenica.

 

Non-Greek MEDITERRANEAN MYTHOLOGIES:

Clark, R.T. 1960. Myth and Symbol in Ancient Egypt. London/New York: Thames & Hudson.

Frankfort, H. 1948. Kingship and the Gods: A Study of Ancient Near Eastern Religion as the Integration of Society & Nature. Chicago: University of Chicago (ISBN 0-226-26011-9).

George, A.R. 2003. The Babylonian Gilgamesh Epic: Introduction, Critical Edition, and Cuneiform Texts 2 vols. Oxford: Oxford U. Press.

Jacobsen, Th. 1976. The Treasures of Darkness: A History of Mesopotamian Religion. New Haven: Yale U Press (ISBN 0-300-02291-3).

GREEK AND ROMAN MYTHOLOGY:

Price, S. and E. Kearns. 2004. The Oxford Dictionary of Classical Myth and Religion. Oxford: Oxford U Press.

Buxton, R. 2004. The Complete World of Greek Mythology. London: Thames and Hudson.

Grant, M. 1962. The Myths of the Greeks and Romans. New York: NAL-Mentor (ISBN 0-452-00420-9).

Detienne, M. 2003. The Writing of Orpheus: Greek Myth in Cultural Context (tr. J. Lloyd). Baltimore: Johns Hopkins (original Paris: Gallimard, 1968).

Bernabé, P.A. and A. Jiménez San Cristóbal. 2008. Instructions for the Netherworld: The Orphic Gold Tablets. Leiden-Boston: Brill. 

Freedman, L. 2003. The Revival of the Olympian Gods in Renaissance Art. Cambridge: Cambridge U Press.

Brumble, H.D. 1998. Classical Myths and Legends in the Middle Ages and Renaissance. New York: Routledge.

Miles, G. 1999. Classical Mythology in English Literature. New York: Routledge.

O'Brien, M. 1968. Twentieth Century Interpretations of OEDIPUS REX. Englewood Cliffs NJ: Prentice Hall.

Lefkowitz, M. 2003. Greek Gods, Human Lives: What We Can Learn From Myths. New Haven: Yale U Press.

Nilsson, M.P. 1931 (and frequently reprinted ever since). The Mycenaean Origins of Greek Mythology. New York: Norton.

Mikalson, J.D. 1983. Athenian Popular Religion. Chapel Hill: U. North Carolina.

Ogden, D. 2002. Magic, Witchcraft, and Ghosts in the Greek and Roman Worlds: A Sourcebook. Oxford: Oxford U Press.

Anderson, G. 2000. Fairytale in the Ancient World. New York: Routledge.

Dowden, K. 2005. Zeus. New York: Routledge.

Dougherty, C. 2005. Prometheus. New York: Routledge.

Breitberger, B. 2004. Aphrodite and Eros: The Development of Greek Erotic Mythology. New York: Routledge.

Buxton, R. 2009. Forms of Astonishment: Greek Myths of Metamorphosis. New York: Oxford University Press.

Veyne, P. 1983. Did the Greeks Believe in their Myths? Chicago: U of Chicago Press.

Grant, M. 1971. Roman Myths. New York: Scribners.

Perowne, S. 1969. Roman Mythology. New York: Paul Hamlyn.

Wildfang, R.L. 2006. Rome's Vestal Virgins. New York: Routledge.

Wiseman, T.P. 1995. Remus: A Roman Myth. Cambridge: Cambridge U Press.

Wiseman, T.P. 2004. The Myths of Rome. Exeter: University of Exeter Press.

Turcan, R. 1996. The Cults of the Roman Empire. Cambridge: Blackwell [Paris: Les Belles Lettres 1992].

Burkert, W. 1979. Structure and History in Greek Mythology and Ritual. Berkeley/Los Angeles: U of California.

Burkert, W. 1983. Homo necans. The Anthropology of Ancient Greek Sacrificial Ritual and Myth (trans. P. Bing). Berkeley/Los Angeles: U of California.

Burkert, W. 1987. Ancient Mystery Cults. Cambridge, Mass: Harvard U Press.

Bowlby, R. 2009. Freudian Mythologies: Greek Tragedy and Modern Identities. New York/Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Bell, R.E. 1993. Women in Classical Mythology. Oxford: Oxford U Press.

Deacey, S. 2008. Athena. New York: Routledge.

Demand, N. 1994. Birth, Death, and Motherhood in Classical Greece. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins.

Dougherty, C. 2005. Prometheus. New York: Routledge.

Graf, F. 2008. Apollo. New York: Routledge.

Ogden, D. 2008. Perseus. New York: Routledge.

Larson, J. 1995. Greek Heroine Cults. Madison: University of Wisconsin.

Lefkowitz, M.R. 1990. Women in Greek Myth. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins.

Seaford, R. 200. Dionysos. New York: Routledge.

Sergent, B. 1986. Homosexuality in Greek Myth. London: Athlone. 

Australian Mythology

Allen, L. 1975. Time Before Morning: Art and Myth of the Australian Aborigines. New York: Crowell.

Arden, H. 1994. Dreamkeepers: A Spirit Journey into Aboriginal Australia. New York: HarperCollins.

Beckett, J. (ed.). 1988. Past and Present: The Construction of Aboriginality. Canberra: Aboriginal Studies Press.

Bell, D. 1978. Daughters of the Dreaming. Sydney: Allen and Unwin.

Berndt, R. & Berndt, C. 1977. The World of the First Australians. Sydney: Ure Smith.

______. 1989. The Speaking Land. Melbourne: Penguin.

Blows, J. 1995. Eagle and Crow: An Exploration of Australian Aboriginal Myth. New York: Garland.

Chatwin, B. 1987. The Songlines. London: Penguin.

Cowan, J. 1990. Mysteries of the Dreaming: The Spiritual Life of Australian Aborigines. Dorset: Prism.

Eliade, M. 1973. Australian Religions: An Introduction. Ithaca: Cornell University Press.

Gill, S. 1998. Storytracking. Texts, Stories, and Histories in Central Australia. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Hiatt, L. 1975. Australian Aboriginal Mythology: Essays in Honour of W.E.H Stanner. Canberra: Australian Institute of Aboriginal Studies.

Horton, D. 1994. The Encyclopedia of Aboriginal Australia: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander History, Society, and Culture. Canberra: Aboriginal Studies Press.

Hume, L. 1997. Witchcraft and Paganism in Australia. Carlton: Melbourne University Press.

______. 2002. Ancestral Power. The Dreaming, Consciousness and Aboriginal Australians. Melbourne: Melbourne University Press.

Isaacs, J. 1980. Australian Dreaming: 40,000 Years of Aboriginal History. Sydney: Lansdowne Press.

Janssen, H. (ed.) 1973. Tolai Myths of Origin. Milton: Jacaranda Press.

Lawlor, R. 1991. Voices Of The First Day: Awakening in the Aboriginal Dreamtime. Rochester VT: Inner Traditions.

McConnel, U. 1957. Myths of the Munkan. Carlton: Melbourne University Press.

Mountford, C. 1985. The Dreamtime Book: Australian Aboriginal Myths. Sydney: ETT Imprint.

Reed, A. 1965. Myths and Legends of Australia. Sydney: Reed.

______, 1978. Aboriginal Myths: Tales of the Dreamtime. Terry Hills: Reed.

______, 1993. Aboriginal Myths, Legends, and Fables. Chatswood: Reed.

Robinson, R. 1966. Aboriginal Myths and Legends. Melbourne: Sun Books.

Róheim, G. 1945. The Eternal Ones of the Dream. A Psychoanalytic Interpretation of Australian Myth and Ritual. New York: International University Press.

Sutton, Peter. 2003. Native Title in Australia: An Ethnographic Perspective. Cambridge: Cambridge U Press.

Voigt , A. & Drury, N. 1997. Wisdom Of The Earth: The Living Legacy of the Aboriginal Dreamtime. East Roseville: Simon & Schuster.

Unit Schedule

WEEK

LECTURE 1 (TUES)

LECTURE 2 (WED)

ASSESSMENT

1

What is Myth?

Cosmogony: Aboriginal Traditions

 

2

Cosmogony: Ancient Near East

Cosmogony: Hesiod

QUIZ 1, online, submit 23:59 8/8/2021 = Sunday midnight of week 2 

3

Kingship and kinship: Aboriginal Traditions

Kings and Gods: Ancient Near Eastern Traditions

 

4

Homer: the Iliad

Homer: the Odyssey

QUIZ 2, online, submit 23:59 22/8/2021 = Sunday midnight of week 4 

5

Polis: Rites of Passage

Polis: Dionysian and Eleusinian Mysteries

 

6

Heracles: the 13th Olympian

Female Heroines and Greek Drama

QUIZ 3, online, submit 23:59 5/9/2021 = Sunday midnight of week 6 

7

After the Polis: Text as Ritual

Alexander and the Successors: Myth and History

ANALYSIS OF MYTH DUE 23:59 12/9/2021 = SUNDAY MIDNIGHT OF WEEK 7 

 

8

Myth in Philosophy I

Myth in Philosophy II

QUIZ 4, online, submit 23:59 3/10/2021 = Sunday midnight of week 8 

9

Roman Myths I: Aeneid

Roman Myths II: Ovid

 

10

Theoretical Approaches Structuralism

Theoretical Approaches Poststucturalism

QUIZ 5, online, submit 23:59 17/10/2021 = Sunday midnight of week 10 

11

Theoretical Approaches Functionalism

Theoretical Approaches Phenomenology

 

12

REVISION I

REVISION 2

ESSAY DUE 23:59 31/10/2021 = SUNDAY MIDNIGHT OF WEEK 12 

13                           NO CLASSES OR TUTORIAL THIS WEEK

Policies and Procedures

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central (https://policies.mq.edu.au). Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Students seeking more policy resources can visit Student Policies (https://students.mq.edu.au/support/study/policies). It is your one-stop-shop for the key policies you need to know about throughout your undergraduate student journey.

To find other policies relating to Teaching and Learning, visit Policy Central (https://policies.mq.edu.au) and use the search tool.

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/admin/other-resources/student-conduct

Results

Results published on platform other than eStudent, (eg. iLearn, Coursera etc.) or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent. For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au or if you are a Global MBA student contact globalmba.support@mq.edu.au

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Learning Skills

Learning Skills (mq.edu.au/learningskills) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to help you improve your marks and take control of your study.

The Library provides online and face to face support to help you find and use relevant information resources. 

Student Enquiry Service

For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at ask.mq.edu.au

If you are a Global MBA student contact globalmba.support@mq.edu.au

Equity Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

IT Help

For help with University computer systems and technology, visit http://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/information_technology/help/

When using the University's IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use of IT Resources Policy. The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network including students.