Students

MHIS2011 – Making War Modern: From Revolutionary Soldier to Peacekeeper

2021 – Session 2, Fully online/virtual

Session 2 Learning and Teaching Update

The decision has been made to conduct study online for the remainder of Session 2 for all units WITHOUT mandatory on-campus learning activities. Exams for Session 2 will also be online where possible to do so.

This is due to the extension of the lockdown orders and to provide certainty around arrangements for the remainder of Session 2. We hope to return to campus beyond Session 2 as soon as it is safe and appropriate to do so.

Some classes/teaching activities cannot be moved online and must be taught on campus. You should already know if you are in one of these classes/teaching activities and your unit convenor will provide you with more information via iLearn. If you want to confirm, see the list of units with mandatory on-campus classes/teaching activities.

Visit the MQ COVID-19 information page for more detail.

General Information

Download as PDF
Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff Leccturer and Convenor
Jessica Johnson
By appointment
Credit points Credit points
10
Prerequisites Prerequisites
40cp at 1000 level or above OR (10cp in HIST or MHIS or POL or POIR or MHIX or POIX units)
Corequisites Corequisites
Co-badged status Co-badged status
Unit description Unit description

This unit is an intellectual and cultural history of modern war and peace making. It explores the historical emergence of the categories and practices through which modern wars have been waged and peace has been forged, in particular, we examine how ideas about race, gender and nation have underpinned modern war-making and been challenged by them. The unit examines a major conflict each week, and then explores how peace has been differently made in its wake. We begin with the French Revolutionary Wars and move through the 19th and 20th centuries, including the World Wars, the Cold War, and wars of decolonization. This will reveal when many of the ideas and practices that seem like common sense to our eyes took historical shape – such as the protection of civilians, real-time war reporting, the use of mass conscription, the widespread memorialisation of war-time loss as a nation-making project, and the use of propaganda. The story of modern war-making is often told through a focus on European nations and their conflicts with each other. However, this unit has a particular focus on how Europeans began to employ to a different set of rules and norms when waging wars with non-European peoples. The unit asks whether conventional stories about modern military strategy, practices and restraints are challenged when we put the experiences of non-Europeans in the frame?

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at https://students.mq.edu.au/important-dates

Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of this unit, you will be able to:

  • ULO1: Demonstrate schematic knowledge of major conflicts and efforts to make peace in modern history.
  • ULO2: Analyse how empirical research and methodological debate has expanded and challenged existing historiography.
  • ULO3: Critically appraise the arguments of other historians (both theoretically and empirically).
  • ULO4: Locate, identify, read and analyse existing historical research with some guidance.
  • ULO5: Clearly communicate a point of view about the past using the terminology and techniques accepted in the historical profession in written form.
  • ULO6: Consider how war and peace are experienced differently (according to gender, race, class, sexuality and historical location).
  • ULO7: Examine and critically appraise popular histories and narratives of war and peace.

General Assessment Information

Unless a Special Consideration request has been submitted and approved, (a) a penalty for lateness will apply – 10 marks out of 100 credit will be deducted per day for assignments submitted after the due date – and (b) no assignment will be accepted seven days (incl. weekends) after the original submission deadline.

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Hurdle Due
Research Essay 45% No 17:00, 5/11/2021
Essay progress report 25% No 17:00, 27/9/2011
Weekly Quiz 30% No Completed weekly

Research Essay

Assessment Type 1: Essay
Indicative Time on Task 2: 56 hours
Due: 17:00, 5/11/2021
Weighting: 45%

 

Research essay topics will be made available on ilearn by week 3 and will relate to the weekly topics covered in the unit. Students will conduct independent research to develop an historical interpretation and place this in an historiographic field. Workshops will be held in seminars to guide students through this major task. This assessment focuses on a deep knowledge of one topic covered in the unit.

 


On successful completion you will be able to:
  • Demonstrate schematic knowledge of major conflicts and efforts to make peace in modern history.
  • Analyse how empirical research and methodological debate has expanded and challenged existing historiography.
  • Critically appraise the arguments of other historians (both theoretically and empirically).
  • Locate, identify, read and analyse existing historical research with some guidance.
  • Clearly communicate a point of view about the past using the terminology and techniques accepted in the historical profession in written form.

Essay progress report

Assessment Type 1: Plan
Indicative Time on Task 2: 10 hours
Due: 17:00, 27/9/2011
Weighting: 25%

 

A short report on progress towards the completion of the research essay.

 


On successful completion you will be able to:
  • Analyse how empirical research and methodological debate has expanded and challenged existing historiography.
  • Critically appraise the arguments of other historians (both theoretically and empirically).
  • Locate, identify, read and analyse existing historical research with some guidance.

Weekly Quiz

Assessment Type 1: Quiz/Test
Indicative Time on Task 2: 2 hours
Due: Completed weekly
Weighting: 30%

 

A quiz about the weekly readings and lectures, multiple choice and short answer.

 


On successful completion you will be able to:
  • Demonstrate schematic knowledge of major conflicts and efforts to make peace in modern history.
  • Critically appraise the arguments of other historians (both theoretically and empirically).
  • Clearly communicate a point of view about the past using the terminology and techniques accepted in the historical profession in written form.
  • Consider how war and peace are experienced differently (according to gender, race, class, sexuality and historical location).
  • Examine and critically appraise popular histories and narratives of war and peace.

1 If you need help with your assignment, please contact:

  • the academic teaching staff in your unit for guidance in understanding or completing this type of assessment
  • the Learning Skills Unit for academic skills support.

2 Indicative time-on-task is an estimate of the time required for completion of the assessment task and is subject to individual variation

Delivery and Resources

Unit readings available on Leganto and detailed assessment guides and weekly schedule on ilearn.

Policies and Procedures

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central (https://policies.mq.edu.au). Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Students seeking more policy resources can visit Student Policies (https://students.mq.edu.au/support/study/policies). It is your one-stop-shop for the key policies you need to know about throughout your undergraduate student journey.

To find other policies relating to Teaching and Learning, visit Policy Central (https://policies.mq.edu.au) and use the search tool.

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/admin/other-resources/student-conduct

Results

Results published on platform other than eStudent, (eg. iLearn, Coursera etc.) or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent. For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au or if you are a Global MBA student contact globalmba.support@mq.edu.au

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Learning Skills

Learning Skills (mq.edu.au/learningskills) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to help you improve your marks and take control of your study.

The Library provides online and face to face support to help you find and use relevant information resources. 

Student Enquiry Service

For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at ask.mq.edu.au

If you are a Global MBA student contact globalmba.support@mq.edu.au

Equity Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

IT Help

For help with University computer systems and technology, visit http://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/information_technology/help/

When using the University's IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use of IT Resources Policy. The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network including students.