Students

INED8020 – Indigenous Research Theory and Practice

2021 – Session 2, Fully online/virtual

Session 2 Learning and Teaching Update

The decision has been made to conduct study online for the remainder of Session 2 for all units WITHOUT mandatory on-campus learning activities. Exams for Session 2 will also be online where possible to do so.

This is due to the extension of the lockdown orders and to provide certainty around arrangements for the remainder of Session 2. We hope to return to campus beyond Session 2 as soon as it is safe and appropriate to do so.

Some classes/teaching activities cannot be moved online and must be taught on campus. You should already know if you are in one of these classes/teaching activities and your unit convenor will provide you with more information via iLearn. If you want to confirm, see the list of units with mandatory on-campus classes/teaching activities.

Visit the MQ COVID-19 information page for more detail.

General Information

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Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff
Tristan Kennedy
Bronwyn Carlson
Credit points Credit points
10
Prerequisites Prerequisites
Admission to MIndigenousEd
Corequisites Corequisites
Co-badged status Co-badged status
Unit description Unit description

In preparation for conducting research, this unit provides an opportunity to develop a hypothetical research project that supports students to develop their skills prior to engaging in research involving human subjects. The unit covers topics from conceptualising a research project, developing a research proposal including design and methodology, applying for ethics approval and ensuring research is best practice, ethical and promotes meaningful engagement and reciprocity between researchers and Indigenous people and communities.

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at https://students.mq.edu.au/important-dates

Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of this unit, you will be able to:

  • ULO1: Demonstrate a high level understanding of the ethical and methodological requirements of research with Indigenous people and communities.
  • ULO2: Analyse, identify and evaluate issues concerning research in Indigenous contexts.
  • ULO3: Demonstrate knowledge of Indigenous methodologies and the ability to apply them to research.
  • ULO4: Critically reflect on your responsibilities as a researcher.
  • ULO6: Demonstrated high level of written communication skills including structuring and supporting an academic argument.
  • ULO7: Confidently use online communication forums and engage in informed interactive learning.

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Hurdle Due
Review Essay 30% No 10th September
Tutorial Activities 30% No Weekly
Major Essay 40% No 5th November

Review Essay

Assessment Type 1: Essay
Indicative Time on Task 2: 20 hours
Due: 10th September
Weighting: 30%

The review essay requires a critical analysis and discussion of an Indigenous research methods text chosen from a list provided.


On successful completion you will be able to:
  • Analyse, identify and evaluate issues concerning research in Indigenous contexts.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of Indigenous methodologies and the ability to apply them to research.
  • Demonstrated high level of written communication skills including structuring and supporting an academic argument.

Tutorial Activities

Assessment Type 1: Participatory task
Indicative Time on Task 2: 26 hours
Due: Weekly
Weighting: 30%

You will be required to actively participate in weekly online tutorial activities. These will be available on a weekly basis on iLearn.


On successful completion you will be able to:
  • Analyse, identify and evaluate issues concerning research in Indigenous contexts.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of Indigenous methodologies and the ability to apply them to research.
  • Critically reflect on your responsibilities as a researcher.
  • Confidently use online communication forums and engage in informed interactive learning.

Major Essay

Assessment Type 1: Essay
Indicative Time on Task 2: 40 hours
Due: 5th November
Weighting: 40%

This task requires students to choose one question from a list provided. The essay will ask students to critically engage with Indigenous research frameworks outlined in the unit.


On successful completion you will be able to:
  • Demonstrate a high level understanding of the ethical and methodological requirements of research with Indigenous people and communities.
  • Analyse, identify and evaluate issues concerning research in Indigenous contexts.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of Indigenous methodologies and the ability to apply them to research.
  • Demonstrated high level of written communication skills including structuring and supporting an academic argument.

1 If you need help with your assignment, please contact:

  • the academic teaching staff in your unit for guidance in understanding or completing this type of assessment
  • the Learning Skills Unit for academic skills support.

2 Indicative time-on-task is an estimate of the time required for completion of the assessment task and is subject to individual variation

Delivery and Resources

Recommended Reading List

Ball, J. and Janyst, P., 2008. Enacting research ethics in partnerships with indigenous communities in Canada:“Do it in a good way”. Journal of Empirical Research on Human Research Ethics, 3(2), pp.33-51.

Ball, J., & Janyst, P., 2008, ‘Enacting research ethics in partnerships with indigenous communities in Canada: “Do it in a good way”, Journal of Empirical Research on Human Research Ethics, 3:2, pp. 33-51.

Bessarab, D. and Ng'andu, B., 2010. Yarning about yarning as a legitimate method in Indigenous research. International Journal of Critical Indigenous Studies, 3(1), pp.37-50.

Czaykowska-Higgins, E., 2009, ‘Research models, community engagement, and linguistic fieldwork: Reflections on working within Canadian Indigenous communities’, Language Documentation & Conservation, 3:1, pp. 15-50.

Daftary, A.M.H., 2018. Critical race theory: An effective framework for social work research. Journal of Ethnic & Cultural Diversity in Social Work, pp.1-16.

Foley, D., 2003. Indigenous epistemology and Indigenous standpoint theory. Social Alternatives, 22(1), p.44.

Fredericks, B., 2007, 'Utilising the concept of pathway as a framework for Indigenous research', The Australian Journal of Indigenous Education, 36(S1), pp. 15-22.

Greene, S., 2008, 'Introduction: Teaching for Social Justice', Counterpoints, pp. 1-25.

Heiss, A., 2002. Writing about indigenous Australia--some issues to consider and protocols to follow: a discussion paper. Southerly, 62(2), pp.197-207.

Kavelin, C., 2008, ‘Universities as the Gatekeepers of the Intellectual Property of Indigenous People's Medical Knowledge’, The Australian Journal of Indigenous Education, 37, pp. 34-45.

Kim Elston, J., Saunders, V., Hayes, B., Bainbridge, R. and McCoy, B., 2013. Building indigenous Australian research capacity. Contemporary nurse, 46(1), pp.6-12.

Kovach, M., 2010. Conversational method in Indigenous research. First Peoples Child & Family Review, 14(1), pp.123-136.

Ladson-Billings, G., 1998. Just what is critical race theory and what's it doing in a nice field like education?. International journal of qualitative studies in education, 11(1), pp.7-24.

McGregor, D., 2004, "Coming full circle: Indigenous knowledge, environment, and our future." American Indian Quarterly. 28.3/4.

Nakata, M., 2007. An Indigenous standpoint theory. Disciplining the savages: Savaging the disciplines, p.213.

Russell-Mundine, G., 2012. Reflexivity in Indigenous research: Reframing and decolonising research?. Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Management, 19.

Smith, L.T., 2013. ‘Chapter Three: Colonizing Knowledges’ Decolonizing methodologies: Research and indigenous peoples. Zed Books Ltd..

Vass, G., 2012. ‘So, what is wrong with Indigenous education?’Perspective, position and power beyond a deficit discourse. The Australian Journal of Indigenous Education, 41(2), pp.85-96.

Walter, M., 2016. Data politics and Indigenous representation in Australian statistics. Indigenous data sovereignty: Toward an agenda, 38, pp.79-98.

Walter, M., 2018. The voice of Indigenous data: Beyond the markers of disadvantage. Griffith Review, (60), p.256.

Wane, N.N., 2008. Mapping the field of indigenous knowledges in anti‐colonial discourse: A transformative journey in education. Race Ethnicity and Education, 11(2), pp.183-197.

Wilson, S., 2001, 'What is an Indigenous Research Methodology?' Canadian Journal of Native Education, 25:2, p. 175.

Yosso, T.J., 2005. Whose culture has capital? A critical race theory discussion of community cultural wealth. Race ethnicity and education, 8(1), pp.69-91.

 

Unit Schedule

Policies and Procedures

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central (https://staff.mq.edu.au/work/strategy-planning-and-governance/university-policies-and-procedures/policy-central). Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Students seeking more policy resources can visit the Student Policy Gateway (https://students.mq.edu.au/support/study/student-policy-gateway). It is your one-stop-shop for the key policies you need to know about throughout your undergraduate student journey.

If you would like to see all the policies relevant to Learning and Teaching visit Policy Central (https://staff.mq.edu.au/work/strategy-planning-and-governance/university-policies-and-procedures/policy-central).

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/admin/other-resources/student-conduct

Results

Results published on platform other than eStudent, (eg. iLearn, Coursera etc.) or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent. For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au or if you are a Global MBA student contact globalmba.support@mq.edu.au

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Learning Skills

Learning Skills (mq.edu.au/learningskills) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to help you improve your marks and take control of your study.

The Library provides online and face to face support to help you find and use relevant information resources. 

Student Enquiry Service

For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at ask.mq.edu.au

If you are a Global MBA student contact globalmba.support@mq.edu.au

Equity Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

IT Help

For help with University computer systems and technology, visit http://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/information_technology/help/

When using the University's IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use of IT Resources Policy. The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network including students.

Protocols for Indigenous Studies

In Australia there are two distinct Indigenous peoples: Aboriginal people and Torres Strait Islander people.

When writing about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders do not use the acronym ‘ATSI’, write in full. Capital letters should always be used when referring to Aboriginal peoples and or Torres Strait Islander peoples.

While Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander are acceptable terms to use, it should be recognised that these are collective terms and often used improperly to impose a single identity on the many different communities.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people generally prefer to be known by the language/cultural groups or communities, to which they belong, that is, own names rather than terms such 'the Aboriginals' or 'the Islanders'. For example, Aboriginal people in the area surrounding Macquarie University may refer to themselves as Dharug. It is important that you always check the correct name or terms to use for people in the area/region.

The use of incorrect, inappropriate or dated terminology is to be avoided as it can give offence. Many historical terms or those in common usage some years ago are now not acceptable, including terms such as 'aborigine' ‘native’, ‘savage’ and ‘primitive’. Similarly, do not use the terms ‘half-caste’, ‘part-Aborigine/Aboriginal’ or any reference to skin colour or physical features, as they do not signify that a person is Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander and may cause offence. When quoting from academic or other sources that uses inappropriate, dated terminology or racists language, use (sic) directly after the inappropriate term of phrase, thus calling attention to the fact that it has been sourced from the original and that you understand it to be outdated, inappropriate or problematic in the contemporary context.