Students

MHIS3040 – Who the Bloody Hell Are We?: Story and Citizenship in Australian History

2021 – Session 2, Weekday attendance, North Ryde

Session 2 Learning and Teaching Update

The decision has been made to conduct study online for the remainder of Session 2 for all units WITHOUT mandatory on-campus learning activities. Exams for Session 2 will also be online where possible to do so.

This is due to the extension of the lockdown orders and to provide certainty around arrangements for the remainder of Session 2. We hope to return to campus beyond Session 2 as soon as it is safe and appropriate to do so.

Some classes/teaching activities cannot be moved online and must be taught on campus. You should already know if you are in one of these classes/teaching activities and your unit convenor will provide you with more information via iLearn. If you want to confirm, see the list of units with mandatory on-campus classes/teaching activities.

Visit the MQ COVID-19 information page for more detail.

General Information

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Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff
Leigh Boucher
Michelle Arrow
Tutor
Amy Way
please email for an appointment
Credit points Credit points
10
Prerequisites Prerequisites
130cp at 1000 level or above OR (20cp in HIST or MHIS or POL or POIR or MHIX or POIX units at 2000 level)
Corequisites Corequisites
Co-badged status Co-badged status
Unit description Unit description

Ideas about Australian identity have always been expressed and contested in popular culture. These stories of ‘us’ have also meant that some people are seen to belong, and others are excluded from the full exercise of citizenship. This unit will examine Australian history through an examination of 10 key moments when the nation and its citizens were re-imagined in films, songs, novels, poetry, advertisements, sporting contests and plays. Each week we will examine a key turning point in Australian history and the popular culture that was produced to grapple with its consequences. When and why did the bushman become a central figure in the Australian imagination? How did ‘Muriel’s Wedding’ reimagine mateship in the wake of feminist protest? In what ways did advertisements featuring Rhonda and Ketut envisage the relationship between Australia and Asia? Students who complete this unit will develop a critical understanding of the relationship between storytelling and citizenship, master a chronology of the struggles over citizenship that shaped twentieth century Australian political history, and engage widely with the cultural institutions and archives in which our national memory is stored. They will also engage in a wide variety of historical research, classroom debate, and develop an original research topic to investigate. If you have already studied some Australian history, the unit offers a fresh perspective. It will be particularly useful for students who are intending to teach Australian history in schools.

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at https://students.mq.edu.au/important-dates

Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of this unit, you will be able to:

  • ULO1: Analyse different kinds of historical evidence, including visual and textual sources.
  • ULO2: Analyse and apply historical information (especially self-located research materials).
  • ULO3: Communicate effectively in oral forms, and in a range of written forms.

General Assessment Information

Unless a special consideration request has been submitted and approved, a) a penalty for lateness will apply - 10 marks out of 100 credit will be deducted per day for assignments submitted after the due date and b) no assignment will be accepted seven days (including weekends) after the original submission deadline.

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Hurdle Due
Weekly Quiz 30% No Weekly, in class
Research Essay 50% No 23:59 5/11/2021
Research Proposal 20% No 23:59 10/09/2021

Weekly Quiz

Assessment Type 1: Quiz/Test
Indicative Time on Task 2: 12 hours
Due: Weekly, in class
Weighting: 30%

A set of two short answer quiz questions that will be embedded in the online lecture and should be completed before the weekly tutorial/online discussions.


On successful completion you will be able to:
  • Analyse different kinds of historical evidence, including visual and textual sources.
  • Analyse and apply historical information (especially self-located research materials).
  • Communicate effectively in oral forms, and in a range of written forms.

Research Essay

Assessment Type 1: Essay
Indicative Time on Task 2: 45 hours
Due: 23:59 5/11/2021
Weighting: 50%

The research essay forms the major assessment task of the course and requires a high degree of thought, effort and preparation.


On successful completion you will be able to:
  • Analyse different kinds of historical evidence, including visual and textual sources.
  • Analyse and apply historical information (especially self-located research materials).
  • Communicate effectively in oral forms, and in a range of written forms.

Research Proposal

Assessment Type 1: Annotated bibliography
Indicative Time on Task 2: 15 hours
Due: 23:59 10/09/2021
Weighting: 20%

Students will submit a research proposal for the major essay that includes an annotated bibliography and also sketches out an approach to the question.


On successful completion you will be able to:
  • Analyse different kinds of historical evidence, including visual and textual sources.
  • Analyse and apply historical information (especially self-located research materials).
  • Communicate effectively in oral forms, and in a range of written forms.

1 If you need help with your assignment, please contact:

  • the academic teaching staff in your unit for guidance in understanding or completing this type of assessment
  • the Learning Skills Unit for academic skills support.

2 Indicative time-on-task is an estimate of the time required for completion of the assessment task and is subject to individual variation

Delivery and Resources

Delivery:

this unit is taught through a combination of a lecture, readings (which may include viewing material online) and tutorial discussions - the lecture will be available online, and you must listen to the lecture and read/view primary sources before you before you participate in the discussions.

Resources:

All the required readings for MHIS3040 are available via the MHIS3040 iLearn site or directly through the University Library (Leganto). You do not require any textbooks.

 

 

Unit Schedule

Unit Schedule

Week 1 Introduction – popular culture and citizenship

Week 2 Colonial Ballads

Week 3 Performing Indigeneity

Week 4 Painting the Settler Boom

Week 5 The Bush Legend

Week 6 WWI, cartoons and propaganda

Week 7 – READING WEEK

Week 8 – Women and War: WWII

Week 9 – Postwar Assimilation

Week 10 – Culture as Activism: Women’s Liberation

Week 11 – Party and Protest: the Sydney Gay and Lesbian Mardi Gras

Week  12 -  Cronulla riots and talkback radio?? LB

Week 13 – Hi-Vis Nation? The Tradie and Australian Citizenship in the 21st Century

 

Policies and Procedures

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central (https://policies.mq.edu.au). Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Students seeking more policy resources can visit Student Policies (https://students.mq.edu.au/support/study/policies). It is your one-stop-shop for the key policies you need to know about throughout your undergraduate student journey.

To find other policies relating to Teaching and Learning, visit Policy Central (https://policies.mq.edu.au) and use the search tool.

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/admin/other-resources/student-conduct

Results

Results published on platform other than eStudent, (eg. iLearn, Coursera etc.) or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent. For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au or if you are a Global MBA student contact globalmba.support@mq.edu.au

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Learning Skills

Learning Skills (mq.edu.au/learningskills) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to help you improve your marks and take control of your study.

The Library provides online and face to face support to help you find and use relevant information resources. 

Student Enquiry Service

For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at ask.mq.edu.au

If you are a Global MBA student contact globalmba.support@mq.edu.au

Equity Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

IT Help

For help with University computer systems and technology, visit http://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/information_technology/help/

When using the University's IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use of IT Resources Policy. The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network including students.