Students

AHIX8230 – City of Constantine

2021 – Session 1, Fully online/virtual

Notice

As part of Phase 3 of our return to campus plan, most units will now run tutorials, seminars and other small group activities on campus, and most will keep an online version available to those students unable to return or those who choose to continue their studies online.

To check the availability of face-to-face and online activities for your unit, please go to timetable viewer. To check detailed information on unit assessments visit your unit's iLearn space or consult your unit convenor.

General Information

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Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff Lecturer
Peter Edwell
Contact via Email
Email
Tutor
Alexandra Kujanpaa
TBA
Credit points Credit points
10
Prerequisites Prerequisites
Admission to MAncHist (OUA) or GradCertAncHist (OUA)
Corequisites Corequisites
Co-badged status Co-badged status
AHIS8230
Unit description Unit description

This unit examines the history of Constantinople from its foundation by Constantine the Great in the fourth century to its capture by the Ottoman Turks in the fifteenth century. It focuses on the cultural, ecclesiastical, intellectual, military, art and architectural history of the city, using literary, documentary and archaeological evidence.

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at https://students.mq.edu.au/important-dates

Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of this unit, you will be able to:

  • ULO1: Cultivate a deeper appreciation of a range of cultural, social, religious, and political issues when dealing with sources from the past
  • ULO2: Demonstrate an understanding of the importance of primary and secondary texts and images through analysis, expression, and argument
  • ULO3: Participate actively in online discussions

General Assessment Information

Late Assessment Penalty

Unless a Special Consideration request has been submitted and approved, (a) a penalty for lateness will apply – two (2) marks out of 100 will be deducted per day for assignments submitted after the due date – and (b) no assignment will be accepted more than seven (7) days (incl. weekends) after the original submission deadline. No late submissions will be accepted for timed assessments – e.g. quizzes, online tests.

Marks are indicative until final review/moderation after the exam period is finished.

ASSESSMENT TASK 1 WEEKLY ONLINE DISCUSSION

All students will be expected to post at least one (1) response to the Online Discussion forum each week. This posting should be between 100-300 words and it should be in response to the questions posted for that week. 

The assessment criteria for this task is based on participation and the quality of your postings. Grading criteria includes clarity of expression and argument, evidence of independent thought, and the relevance of your response to the questions set by the tutor.

These posts are due at midnight of the Sunday of each tutorial week (i.e. Week 2 is from Monday 1st - Sunday 7th March, and the online discussion should be made by midnight on Sunday 7th March). You are welcome to continue posting to the weekly discussion forum after this due date, but any postings made after midnight on Sunday will not be counted for assessment purposes. You are also welcome to start new discussions each week on topics of interest, but these will not be counted towards this assessment task.

The Online Discussion component is worth 15% of your overall assessment. You will need to post a response to at least 9 of the weekly forums from Weeks 2 to 4 and Weeks 6 to 12 (inclusive). Note that any postings that you make for Week 1, 5 and 13 will not count towards these 9 weekly posts.

 

ASSESSMENT 2 ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY

Students will submit an annotated bibliography of 15 (fifteen) references that will be used for the Major Essay (Assessment 3). In a maximum of 1500 words, these references should include brief commentaries which summarise the work and its relevance to the major essay question. Primary and secondary sources should be included. See weekly bibliographies and the general references in the Delivery and Resources folder below for ideas as to where to start.

ASSESSMENT TASK 3 MAJOR ESSAY

Major Essay Questions

 1. Discuss the factors that led to Constantine's foundation of the city of Constantinople. Why are there differing versions of the city's foundation and inauguration in the sources?

2. Analyse the evidence of Justinian's policy of military and territorial reconquest, and discuss the reasons why he would have adopted such a policy.

3. What do you consider to be the main contributing factors to both periods of iconoclasm (726-787CE and 813-843CE)?

4. How did the Fourth Crusaders justify their attack on fellow Christians and their looting of churches in Constantinople? Examine both Western and Byzantine accounts of the Fourth Crusade and compare their responses to the removal of holy relics and works of art from the city.

5. Discuss the strategies employed by the Fourth Crusaders to besiege Constantinople in 1204CE. Why did the Crusaders attack Constantinople, and how and why were they successful?      

6. Discuss the relationship between the church and state in Byzantium with particular reference to the reign of two emperors. How do you think the Byzantines themselves perceived the relationship between the church and emperor?

7. Discuss the distinctive features of Byzantine art and/or architecture. How was Byzantine art and/or architecture different from Western or early Islamic art of the same period?

 8. Choose two aspects of everyday life in Byzantium and consider the extant evidence to determine what it can tell us about the everyday lives of the Byzantines. Are there any issues with using these sources, and why is the evidence of everyday life less prominent than that of the lives of emperors and saints?  

9. Based on the extant sources, what do you consider to be the main contributing factors to the fall of Constantinople in 1453CE? Was the fall of Constantinople inevitable?

 

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Hurdle Due
Annotated Bibliography 30% No 5pm, Friday 16 April
Weekly online discussion 15% No Weekly
Essay 55% No 5pm, Friday 4 June

Annotated Bibliography

Assessment Type 1: Annotated bibliography
Indicative Time on Task 2: 25 hours
Due: 5pm, Friday 16 April
Weighting: 30%

Students will submit an annotated bibliography of 15 (fifteen) references that will be used for the Major Essay (Assessment 4). In a maximum of 1000 words, these references should include brief commentaries which summarise the work and its relevance to the major essay question. Primary and secondary sources should be included.


On successful completion you will be able to:
  • Cultivate a deeper appreciation of a range of cultural, social, religious, and political issues when dealing with sources from the past
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the importance of primary and secondary texts and images through analysis, expression, and argument

Weekly online discussion

Assessment Type 1: Participatory task
Indicative Time on Task 2: 25 hours
Due: Weekly
Weighting: 15%

Weekly online responses to readings.


On successful completion you will be able to:
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the importance of primary and secondary texts and images through analysis, expression, and argument
  • Participate actively in online discussions

Essay

Assessment Type 1: Essay
Indicative Time on Task 2: 25 hours
Due: 5pm, Friday 4 June
Weighting: 55%

Students are required to submit one (1) 3000 word essay. Students can answer one of the questions provided or devise their own essay question/topic on consultation with the course tutor. The essay topic should be based on one of the lecture/tutorial topics or a combination of both.


On successful completion you will be able to:
  • Cultivate a deeper appreciation of a range of cultural, social, religious, and political issues when dealing with sources from the past
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the importance of primary and secondary texts and images through analysis, expression, and argument

1 If you need help with your assignment, please contact:

  • the academic teaching staff in your unit for guidance in understanding or completing this type of assessment
  • the Learning Skills Unit for academic skills support.

2 Indicative time-on-task is an estimate of the time required for completion of the assessment task and is subject to individual variation

Delivery and Resources

GENERAL BIBLIOGRAPHY   City of Constantine

Reference works

(**) - available online via MQ library

**Cambridge History of the Byzantine Empire c.500-1492 ed. J. Shepard (2008).

Oxford Dictionary of Byzantium, 3 vols ed. A. Kazhdan (1991)

Oxford History of Byzantium ed. C. Mango (2002)

**James, E. (ed.) A Companion to Byzantium. (Chichester, U.K. ; Malden, MA, 2010).

The Oxford Handbook of Byzantine Studies ed. E. Jeffreys (2009)

The Byzantine World ed. P. Stephenson (2010)

A Chronology of the Byzantine Empire ed. T. Venning (2005)

Prosopography of the Byzantine Empire ed. J. R. Martindale (2001-)

Dumbarton Oaks Bibliographies (1973-)

**The Blackwell Companion to Eastern Christianity, ed. Ken Parry (2007).

The Palgrave Atlas of Byzantine History ed. J. Haldon (2006)

Some relevant journals:

Byzantine and Modern Greek Studies

Byzantinische Zeitschrift

Byzantion

Dumbarton Oaks Papers

Greek, Roman and Byzantine Studies

Journal of Hellenic Studies

Revue des Etudes Byzantines

Travaux et Mémoires

 

General Reading:

*Bassett, S. The Urban Image of Late Antique Constantinople (Cambridge, 2007).

*Byrd, K.M. Pierre Gilles' Constantinople: A Modern English Translation (Italica Press, 2008).

*Cameron, A. The Byzantines (Oxford, 2006). 

*Gregory, T. A History of Byzantium (Oxford, 2010).

**Grig, L. and Kelly, G. Two Romes: Rome and Constantinople in Late Antiquity (Oxford, 2012).

*Harris, J. Constantinople: Capital of Byzantium (London, 2007).

*Hatlie, P. The monks and monasteries of Constantinople, ca. 350-850 (Cambridge, UK; New York, 2007).

*Magdalino, P. Studies on the history and topography of Byzantine Constantinople (Aldershot, 2007).

*Mango, C. ed. Studies on Constantinople (Aldershot, 1993).

Mango, C. & Dagron, G. eds. Constantinople and its Hinterland (Aldershot, 1995).

*Necipoglu, N. ed. Byzantine Constantinople: Monuments, Topography and Everyday Life (Leiden, 2001). 

Unit Schedule

See unit website

Policies and Procedures

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central (https://policies.mq.edu.au). Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Students seeking more policy resources can visit Student Policies (https://students.mq.edu.au/support/study/policies). It is your one-stop-shop for the key policies you need to know about throughout your undergraduate student journey.

To find other policies relating to Teaching and Learning, visit Policy Central (https://policies.mq.edu.au) and use the search tool.

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/admin/other-resources/student-conduct

Results

Results published on platform other than eStudent, (eg. iLearn, Coursera etc.) or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent. For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au or if you are a Global MBA student contact globalmba.support@mq.edu.au

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Learning Skills

Learning Skills (mq.edu.au/learningskills) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to help you improve your marks and take control of your study.

The Library provides online and face to face support to help you find and use relevant information resources. 

Student Enquiry Service

For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at ask.mq.edu.au

If you are a Global MBA student contact globalmba.support@mq.edu.au

Equity Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

IT Help

For help with University computer systems and technology, visit http://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/information_technology/help/

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